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Civilian Casualties

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WORLD
October 22, 2010 | By Ahmed Mooge and Patrick Gallagher, Los Angeles Times
When Mohamed Ali Dahir, a 21-year-old business administration student, used to board the bus to school, he wasn't worried about being prepared for an exam or arriving late to a lecture. Instead, he braced himself for gunfire or other violence that might erupt while he was traveling the streets of Mogadishu. Even though his bus is clearly marked as school transportation, he said, there were times when even "the government soldiers open fire at us as we return from our schools or college.
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WORLD
April 24, 2014 | By Shashank Bengali and Hashmat Baktash
KABUL, Afghanistan - The fatal shooting of three Americans in a charity hospital Thursday punctuated a dismal new trend that has emerged in the waning months of the U.S.-led war in Afghanistan: Just as many foreign civilians are being killed as troops. The brazen attack by a police officer at the CURE International hospital in Kabul, which serves 37,000 Afghans a year, shocked even this war-weary city and seemed likely to diminish the already dwindling population of foreigners working in the capital.
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WORLD
July 31, 2013 | By Hashmat Baktash and Mark Magnier
KABUL, Afghanistan -- The number of civilians killed and wounded in Afghanistan grew by almost 25% in the first half of this year as Afghan forces assumed more responsibility for the nation's security, according to a U.N. report released Wednesday. The increase reversed a decline last year that many hoped spelled improved conditions for the most vulnerable victims of the nearly 12-year-old war. Analysts say stepped-up militant attacks against the Afghan government have resulted in more civilians getting caught in the crossfire or being targeted for their perceived government support.
WORLD
December 5, 2013 | By David Zucchino
KABUL, Afghanistan -- Afghan President Hamid Karzai has again accused the United States of killing civilians in a drone airstrike, this time in a Nov. 20 attack on a border area between two eastern provinces where Taliban insurgents maintain strongholds. In a statement released on his presidential website late Wednesday night, Karzai condemned the United States for an alleged drone strike that he said killed seven civilians, including women and children, in Nuristan province on the border with Kunar province near the Pakistan frontier.
OPINION
July 22, 2006 | Alan Dershowitz, ALAN DERSHOWITZ is a professor of law at Harvard. He is the author, most recently, of "Preemption: A Knife that Cuts Both Ways."
THE NEWS IS filled these days with reports of civilian casualties, comparative civilian body counts and criticism of Israel, along with Hezbollah, for causing the deaths, injuries and "collective punishment" of civilians. But just who is a "civilian" in the age of terrorism, when militants don't wear uniforms, don't belong to regular armies and easily blend into civilian populations? We need a new vocabulary to reflect the realities of modern warfare.
WORLD
March 25, 2011 | By Borzou Daragahi, Los Angeles Times
The stories about the lone civilian injured in a coalition airstrike didn't quite match. A man who claimed to be her father, Rajab Mohammad, said she was 18, and injured when she fell on her back after an errant bomb landed on the family farm. A man who claimed to be her brother said she was struck by shrapnel. A man who claimed to be the gardener said the hospitalized victim was an 8-year-old boy. The holes in the wall looked more like they were caused by small-arms fire than bomb fragments.
WORLD
August 2, 2010 | By Ken Dilanian, Los Angeles Times
Efforts to reduce civilian casualties by restricting U.S. airstrikes and other uses of force in Afghanistan are also sparing American troops from attack, according to a study to be unveiled Tuesday. The study by the National Bureau of Economic Research, being released at the nonpartisan New America Foundation in Washington, undercuts the notion that the military faces a zero-sum choice between protecting its troops and protecting civilians, said one of the authors, Jacob Shapiro of Princeton University.
WORLD
February 4, 2004 | From Times Wire Reports
The U.S. commander in Afghanistan, Lt. Gen. David Barno, rejected as insufficient an Afghan government report claiming that 10 civilians were killed in an American raid on suspected Taliban leaders last month in Uruzgan province. President Hamid Karzai had said Interior Ministry officials found that 10 civilians had died, including women and children. But Barno said he still believed his forces had only killed five militants.
NEWS
June 4, 1990 | From Times Wire Services
Palestinian guerrillas who raided the Israeli coast last week planned to attack army officers at a swimming resort, the guerrillas' leader said in remarks published Sunday. "The main objective of the operation was a resort for senior Israeli army officers," Kuwait's Al Siyassah newspaper quoted Abul Abbas, head of the Iraq-based Palestine Liberation Front, as saying. "Hostage-taking was not part of the operation's program. It was the storming of specific enemy positions . . .
NEWS
February 16, 1991 | WILLIAM TUOHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Foreign Secretary Douglas Hurd on Friday entered the fierce, running debate over British media coverage of the Gulf War, declaring that there is a "good deal of concern" about journalistic reports from Baghdad. "There is a very strong feeling in the country," said Hurd, that television stories from Baghdad have supported the Iraqi line on Wednesday's bombing of a structure in the capital. The Iraqis claim the bombing resulted in the deaths of hundreds of civilians.
WORLD
December 1, 2013 | By David Zucchino
JALALABAD, Afghanistan - Miya Jan was filling potholes on the rutted trail that leads to his village in rugged eastern Afghanistan when he heard the whine of a drone aircraft overhead. The sunburned 28-year-old farmer looked up and saw a gray, narrow-winged drone circling the village. A few minutes later, he said, it fired a missile that landed with a tremendous thud across a stony ridge line. Jan ran to the explosion site and recognized the burning frame of his cousin's blue pickup truck.
WORLD
November 29, 2013 | By David Zucchino
KABUL, Afghanistan - The American commander of coalition forces in Afghanistan telephoned Afghan President Hamid Karzai to apologize for an airstrike that killed at least one Afghan civilian and badly wounded two others, a coalition official said Friday. Marine Gen. Joseph F. Dunford Jr. "expressed deep regret" for the civilian casualties, the official said, and promised a joint investigation with Afghan officials into circumstances surrounding the attack Thursday. Dunford made the call late Thursday after Karzai angrily denounced the United States, saying it has repeatedly shown disregard for the lives of Afghan civilians.
WORLD
November 28, 2013 | By David Zucchino, This post has been updated, as indicated in text.
KABUL, Afghanistan -- Afghan President Hamid Karzai erupted in anger at the United States on Thursday over what he said was a drone strike in southern Afghanistan that killed a child and wounded two women. Karzai, already locked in a bitter dispute with the U.S. over American ground raids on Afghan homes, repeated that he will not sign a proposed security agreement between the two nations unless all such raids are ended immediately. In a statement on his presidential website late Thursday night, he seemed to add airstrikes to that demand.
WORLD
November 19, 2013 | By David Zucchino, This post has been updated. See the note below for details.
KABUL, Afghanistan - In a telephone conversation Tuesday, Secretary of State John F. Kerry and Afghan President Hamid Karzai agreed that Kerry would request a letter from President Obama acknowledging the suffering of Afghan civilians caused by U.S. military raids on Afghan homes in recent years, according to Karzai's spokesman. Kerry agreed to take the proposal to Obama as a way to break an impasse that is holding up the signing of a bilateral security agreement that would define the U.S.-Afghan partnership after international combat forces leave Afghanistan at the end of 2014, the spokesman said.
WORLD
September 25, 2013 | Nicholas Soi and Robyn Dixon
President Uhuru Kenyatta declared an end to the Nairobi shopping mall siege after a final day of shooting and explosions Tuesday, but many key questions about the terrorist attack remained unanswered. In a somber speech to the nation, Kenya's leader spelled out the toll -- at least 72 people dead, including six soldiers and five of the attackers. But he offered no details on what happened in the final confrontation between security forces and attackers, in which repeated explosions toppled several floors of the mall and sent a thick plume of smoke into the air. Nor did he explain what happened to hostages reportedly held by members of the Al Qaeda-linked Somali militant group the Shabab, which claimed responsibility for the attack.
WORLD
July 31, 2013 | By Hashmat Baktash and Mark Magnier
KABUL, Afghanistan -- The number of civilians killed and wounded in Afghanistan grew by almost 25% in the first half of this year as Afghan forces assumed more responsibility for the nation's security, according to a U.N. report released Wednesday. The increase reversed a decline last year that many hoped spelled improved conditions for the most vulnerable victims of the nearly 12-year-old war. Analysts say stepped-up militant attacks against the Afghan government have resulted in more civilians getting caught in the crossfire or being targeted for their perceived government support.
BUSINESS
June 11, 2012 | By W.J. Hennigan, Los Angeles Times
Seeking to reduce civilian casualties and collateral damage, the Pentagon will soon deploy a new generation of drones the size of model planes, packing tiny explosive warheads that can be delivered with pinpoint accuracy. Errant drone strikes have been blamed for killing and injuring scores of civilians throughout Pakistan and Afghanistan, giving the U.S. government a black eye as it targets elusive terrorist groups. The Predator and Reaper drones deployed in these regions typically carry 100-pound laser-guided Hellfire missiles or 500-pound GPS-guided smart bombs that can reduce buildings to smoldering rubble.
OPINION
May 17, 2005 | Eric Umansky, Eric Umansky writes for Slate.
Trying to flee fighting in western Iraq last Tuesday, one family in a taxi tried to speed through a Marine checkpoint. There are few details available about what happened next. The Los Angeles Times says only that the car was fired upon, the driver killed and a mother and daughter wounded. It quotes one Marine saying, "We were just sick to death when that lady got out of the car with her baby." It's tempting to dismiss what happened that night as just something that happens in war.
WORLD
June 3, 2013 | By Hashmat Baktash and Alex Rodriguez, Los Angeles Times
KABUL, Afghanistan - Two bomb blasts killed at least 19 people in eastern Afghanistan on Monday, including 11 children and two soldiers from the U.S.-led coalition, as Taliban militants continued a wave of violence as part of their spring offensive. Nine schoolchildren and an Afghan police officer were killed when a suicide bomber on a motorcycle detonated his explosives in a busy market in Paktia province along the Pakistani border, Paktia police chief Zalmai Oryakhail said. Two U.S.-led coalition soldiers were also killed in the attack, according to NATO forces.
WORLD
June 3, 2013 | By Hashmat Baktash and Alex Rodriguez
KABUL, Afghanistan - Two bomb blasts killed at least 19 people, including nine schoolchildren, in eastern Afghanistan on Monday, as Afghan Taliban militants continued a wave of violence as part of their spring offensive. In one attack, a suicide bomber on a motorcycle detonated his explosives in a busy market in eastern Paktia province along the Pakistani border, killing nine schoolchildren and an Afghan police officer, said Paktia police chief Zalmai Oryakhail. Two U.S.-led coalition soldiers were among those killed in the attack, NATO forces said.
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