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Civilian Casualties Afghanistan

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NEWS
July 2, 2000 | From Associated Press
A blistering battle north of this war-battered Afghan capital on Saturday left as many as 30 civilians dead and scores of fighters injured and forced hundreds of people to flee their homes. Opposition soldiers said 30 civilians were killed by Taliban jet fighters that pounded enemy territory in Parwan and Kapisa provinces, both north of Kabul. Because of the fighting and the remoteness of the area, it was impossible to confirm the report independently. "The bombardment was heavy.
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NEWS
October 30, 2001 | ESTHER SCHRADER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Seeking to rebut the growing perception in the Islamic world that U.S. bombs are targeting Afghan civilians, Secretary of Defense Donald H. Rumsfeld on Monday offered his most aggressive defense yet of what he called the painstaking care the Pentagon is putting into avoiding nonmilitary casualties. "No nation in human history has done more to avoid civilian casualties than the United States has in this conflict," Rumsfeld said.
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NEWS
September 21, 1998 | From Reuters
As many as 180 people were killed or wounded when anti-Taliban forces fired their deadliest salvo in years into this capital, hitting a market and a busy residential area, a Taliban spokesman said Sunday. It was the worst attack on Kabul in years and coincided with a major anti-opposition drive by the Taliban, which set the fundamentalist Sunni Muslim militia on a collision course with Iran, which is largely Shiite Muslim.
NEWS
July 2, 2000 | From Associated Press
A blistering battle north of this war-battered Afghan capital on Saturday left as many as 30 civilians dead and scores of fighters injured and forced hundreds of people to flee their homes. Opposition soldiers said 30 civilians were killed by Taliban jet fighters that pounded enemy territory in Parwan and Kapisa provinces, both north of Kabul. Because of the fighting and the remoteness of the area, it was impossible to confirm the report independently. "The bombardment was heavy.
NEWS
October 13, 1996 | From Associated Press
Civilian casualties filled hospitals here following heavy fighting Saturday between Taliban rebels and soldiers loyal to the deposed Afghan government. In one hospital, a 10-month-old baby screamed, his right leg amputated by a shell. An 11-year-old boy, one arm missing, lay stunned under heavy sedation. The wounded arrived in waves of up to 30, many of them civilians.
NEWS
May 6, 1992 | MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Hundreds of shellshocked civilians began fleeing the Afghan capital in panic Tuesday as the second consecutive day of heavy shelling by dissident Muslim guerrillas killed nearly two dozen men, women and children, closed the international airport and further paralyzed the struggling new government.
NEWS
October 25, 1996 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Taliban Islamic militia took the war against its enemies to the skies Thursday, scrambling MIGs to attack positions north of Kabul. In one village, 20 civilians--mostly women and children--were reported killed by a Taliban bomb.
NEWS
October 30, 2001 | ESTHER SCHRADER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Seeking to rebut the growing perception in the Islamic world that U.S. bombs are targeting Afghan civilians, Secretary of Defense Donald H. Rumsfeld on Monday offered his most aggressive defense yet of what he called the painstaking care the Pentagon is putting into avoiding nonmilitary casualties. "No nation in human history has done more to avoid civilian casualties than the United States has in this conflict," Rumsfeld said.
WORLD
March 3, 2009 | TIMES WIRE REPORTS
Civilians will bear the brunt of an escalation in the Afghan war this year as thousands more U.S. troops deploy unless more is done by NATO forces and Taliban militants to protect them, a top Red Cross official said. Civilian casualties in Afghanistan are "significantly higher" today than a year ago, and an intensification of the conflict this year could mean that consequences for many more Afghans will be "dire in the extreme," said Pierre Krahenbuhl, the director of operations for the International Committee of the Red Cross.
NEWS
November 2, 2001
CONGRESS A sharply divided House approved an air-travel security bill supported by President Bush that puts the Republican-controlled chamber in conflict with the Senate over whether airport screeners of passengers and baggage should become federal employees. SECURITY In a possible breach of security that has angered federal officials, Gov.
NEWS
September 21, 1998 | From Reuters
As many as 180 people were killed or wounded when anti-Taliban forces fired their deadliest salvo in years into this capital, hitting a market and a busy residential area, a Taliban spokesman said Sunday. It was the worst attack on Kabul in years and coincided with a major anti-opposition drive by the Taliban, which set the fundamentalist Sunni Muslim militia on a collision course with Iran, which is largely Shiite Muslim.
NEWS
October 25, 1996 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Taliban Islamic militia took the war against its enemies to the skies Thursday, scrambling MIGs to attack positions north of Kabul. In one village, 20 civilians--mostly women and children--were reported killed by a Taliban bomb.
NEWS
October 13, 1996 | From Associated Press
Civilian casualties filled hospitals here following heavy fighting Saturday between Taliban rebels and soldiers loyal to the deposed Afghan government. In one hospital, a 10-month-old baby screamed, his right leg amputated by a shell. An 11-year-old boy, one arm missing, lay stunned under heavy sedation. The wounded arrived in waves of up to 30, many of them civilians.
NEWS
May 6, 1992 | MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Hundreds of shellshocked civilians began fleeing the Afghan capital in panic Tuesday as the second consecutive day of heavy shelling by dissident Muslim guerrillas killed nearly two dozen men, women and children, closed the international airport and further paralyzed the struggling new government.
WORLD
May 2, 2011 | By Alexandra Zavis, Los Angeles Times Staff Writer
Afghan President Hamid Karzai said Monday that the death of Osama bin Laden in neighboring Pakistan proved that "the fight against terrorism is not in Afghanistan. " "I want to call on NATO that the fight against terrorism is not in our homes or villages, nor is it in searching our homes," Karzai was quoted as saying by Reuters news agency. "They should stop that. " Karzai has frequently criticized foreign forces for causing civilian casualties in Afghanistan. Photos: Osama bin Laden is dead Speaking at a gathering of district officials, Karzai said he hoped the Taliban would learn from Bin Laden's fate.
WORLD
May 2, 2010 | By Laura King, Los Angeles Times
Civilian deaths in the last month jumped by one-third over the same period a year ago, the Afghan government said Sunday. The surge in noncombatant fatalities is considered particularly worrisome in advance of a major Western military offensive in Kandahar province this spring and summer. Typically, intensified fighting between insurgents and foreign forces brings a corresponding spike in civilian casualties. Afghanistan's Interior Ministry said 173 civilians were killed between March 21 and April 21, the most recent period for which figures were available.
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