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Civilian Review

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 23, 1989 | RICHARD A. SERRANO, Times Staff Writer
A stinging report from the San Diego County Grand Jury documenting assaults of jail inmates by deputies has sparked calls for the creation of a civilian review board to monitor the County Sheriff's Department. Jim Butler, one of the inmates allegedly beaten in the County Jail in Vista, said he appeared before the Grand Jury on Wednesday and repeated the call for a review board.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 17, 2012 | By Paul Pringle and Andrew Blankstein, Los Angeles Times
Daryl F. Gates was in his 13th year as head of the Los Angeles Police Department when four of his officers pummeled Rodney King on a darkened roadside in Lake View Terrace. If the reforms later inspired by the King episode had been in place at that time, Gates would have been in his third year of retirement. Among the sweeping changes brought to the Los Angeles Police Department because of the 1991 King beating was a voter-approved law limiting police chiefs to two five-year terms.
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NEWS
January 31, 1986 | Associated Press
In what amounts to a revolutionary change for military medicine, the Pentagon moved Thursday to subject the performance of military doctors to systematic civilian review. The Defense Department announced that it had awarded the Commission on Professional and Hospital Activities, a nonprofit organization based in Ann Arbor, Mich., a $4.63-million contract to oversee monthly "peer reviews" of doctors at the nation's 168 military hospitals.
NATIONAL
December 28, 2006 | Jenny Jarvie, Times Staff Writer
A string of fatal police shootings in the Atlanta area prompted civil rights activists Wednesday to urge the city of Atlanta and the neighboring suburb of DeKalb County to establish powerful civilian review boards to investigate complaints of police misconduct. The Rev. Joseph Lowery, convener of the Coalition for the Peoples' Agenda and co-founder of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference, said the review boards should have a professional staff and the power to subpoena.
NEWS
May 27, 1993
Aside from the fact it is answerable to an elected City Council, there is one excellent reason why the Santa Monica Police Department does not need a watchdog oversight board: The council majority, aligned with Santa Monicans for Renters Rights, can use its numerical superiority to make our Police Department answerable to a civilian review board composed of a 100% SMRR super-majority. One need only to look at the city's past 15 years to see the SMRR Marxists and radical multiculturalists at work trying to strip this city of the mainstream American values of personal responsibility and the right of the majority to protection of their economic interests and their own personal safety.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 29, 1992 | JEROME H. SKOLNICK, Jerome H. Skolnick chairs the UC Berkeley Campus Police Review Board and is co-author of "Above The Law: Police and the Excessive Use of Force," to be published by the Free Press in January.
Whoever becomes the next Los Angeles County sheriff will retain extraordinary autonomy. No police commission oversees the policies of the Sheriff's Department. Nor is there any form of civilian oversight of complaints about the sheriff's deputies, even though, of America's 50 largest cities, more than 30 have already adopted some form of civilian review.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 12, 1992 | MARK PLATTE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A Superior Court judge cleared the way Friday for a civilian review panel to call San Diego County sheriff's deputies to testify in public investigations of alleged wrongdoing. Members of the Deputy Sheriff's Assn. had sought to block the panel's rules and regulations that allow public hearings in which deputies are forced to testify, sometimes by subpoena. But Judge Wayne L.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 12, 1992 | KENNETH REICH and FREDERICK M. MUIR, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The authors of a report that found a "deeply disturbing" pattern of brutality by Los Angeles County sheriff's deputies on Friday prodded the Board of Supervisors to immediately form a civilian commission to monitor the department. In a 19-page status report delivered to Sheriff Sherman Block and the five supervisors, special counsel James G.
OPINION
March 31, 1991 | DEBRA CARRILLO, Debra Carrillo was a police officer and deputy marshal in Orange County for five years and has been a public defender since 1988
Had Rodney King not had the benefit of videotape, you wouldn't know his name today. I know this because I'm a deputy public defender for the County of Orange, with dozens of clients who have been victims of police brutality, with only their word against the officers' word. This isn't just a Los Angeles problem. Ah, you say, here's another liberal defense lawyer jumping on the Rodney King bandwagon. Right and wrong.
NEWS
November 11, 1992 | Associated Press
The City Council on Tuesday struck down a call for an immediate citizen review of the fatal police beating of a 35-year-old black man. The council agreed to wait until Police Chief Stanley Knox has completed his investigation before deciding whether to submit the case to a civilian review board. Council President Maryann Mahaffey had asked for a 30-day review by the Board of Police Commissioners, a civilian board that investigates complaints against officers.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 5, 2001 | MITZI GRASSO, Mitzi Grasso is president of the Los Angeles Police Protective League
It's not often that law enforcement professionals in California look to the East for inspiration. We like to think of ourselves as on the leading edge of our profession, and usually we are. But the New York Police Department has a good idea that we should adopt: a civilian complaint review board to handle departmental investigations into allegations of police misconduct.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 1, 2000 | JONATHAN LEVI and LIZ MINEO, Jonathan Levi, a co-founder of Granta, is the author of "A Guide for the Perplexed" (Turtle Bay, 1992). Liz Mineo was an investigative reporter for Lima's El Comercio before moving to the United States
Last Monday, Peru's Supreme Court of Military Justice voided the life sentence of Lori Berenson, convicted as a ringleader of the Peruvian guerrilla force Tupac Amaru Revolutionary Movement, or MRTA, and turned the case over to the civilian courts. A few days before, the Nation magazine printed a story of ours urging just such a civilian review. As journalists, we were overjoyed. Quickly, we found out we were alone.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 3, 2000 | NICHOLAS RICCARDI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
An array of civil rights groups Thursday urged the Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors to create a civilian panel to handle discrimination complaints within the Sheriff's Department. The request was spurred by the case of Sgt. Brian Moriguchi, whose tires were slashed and computer files deleted and who was the target of spurious internal charges in retaliation for his lodging an internal complaint about a racist drawing at a sheriff's station.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 25, 1998 | JIM NEWTON and MATT LAIT, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Just beneath the surface of Los Angeles' charter reform debate, a historic struggle for power is being waged inside the LAPD, with the department's chief trying to solidify his authority and the city's police union taking what once would have been considered desperate measures to resist. According to documents submitted to the city's two charter commissions and interviews with many of the principals, Police Chief Bernard C.
NEWS
August 1, 1993
Your article of July 4 about the Long Beach Citizens Police Complaint Commission was generally fair and accurately illustrated some of the difficulties of operating effective civilian review on a minuscule budget. But your statement that the commission "almost always sides with the police officer" is misleading. The fact that the commission places a comparatively low proportion of complaints in the "sustained" category does not mean that the commission almost always sides with the police.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 28, 1993 | JIM NEWTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In an emotional farewell Tuesday, members of the Los Angeles Police Commission publicly reflected on two years of intense turmoil within the Los Angeles Police Department and paid special tribute to outgoing Commission President Jesse A. Brewer. "It's been an honor and a privilege," Brewer told his fellow commissioners as they held their final session before five new panelists take over. "I'll never forget all of you for what you have done for me."
NEWS
August 1, 1993
Your article of July 4 about the Long Beach Citizens Police Complaint Commission was generally fair and accurately illustrated some of the difficulties of operating effective civilian review on a minuscule budget. But your statement that the commission "almost always sides with the police officer" is misleading. The fact that the commission places a comparatively low proportion of complaints in the "sustained" category does not mean that the commission almost always sides with the police.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 9, 1990
A statement by Sheriff Block in the story (Part A, May 27) about brutality in his department undermines both good government and good police work: "Block said deputies who are sued repeatedly are not necessarily guilty of misconduct. 'We're not going to sacrifice deputies at the altar of public relations.' " As a legalism on individual cases that first sentence is appropriate. However, as a generality, it indicates that Block does not recognize a flaming, brilliant red flag when it is brought to his attention.
NEWS
July 4, 1993 | ROXANA KOPETMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A civilian review commission charged with investigating complaints of misconduct against Long Beach police looked into more than 200 allegations of unnecessary or excessive force last year. It sustained one. That statistic is one reason questions have arisen about how the commission operates. Created in late 1990, the Citizen Police Complaint Commission was touted as the city's first public forum in which residents could air their grievances against police. Proponents pictured open hearings where complainants and officers would square off before a civilian commission that would conduct independent investigations and subpoena witnesses when necessary.
NEWS
May 27, 1993
Aside from the fact it is answerable to an elected City Council, there is one excellent reason why the Santa Monica Police Department does not need a watchdog oversight board: The council majority, aligned with Santa Monicans for Renters Rights, can use its numerical superiority to make our Police Department answerable to a civilian review board composed of a 100% SMRR super-majority. One need only to look at the city's past 15 years to see the SMRR Marxists and radical multiculturalists at work trying to strip this city of the mainstream American values of personal responsibility and the right of the majority to protection of their economic interests and their own personal safety.
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