Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsCivilian Workers
IN THE NEWS

Civilian Workers

FEATURED ARTICLES
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 25, 2012 | By Andrew Blankstein, Los Angeles Times
Nearly 160 civilian Los Angeles Police Department employees could be laid off by Jan. 1 in a plan by City Hall to address its budget deficit, according to an internal department website posting obtained by The Times. LAPD Chief Charlie Beck said jobs targeted for elimination under a previous proposal from City Hall are one police administrator III, 10 secretaries, 81 senior clerk typists, 66 clerk typists and a nutritionist. "I know this is a very stressful time for all and I want to avoid rumors and miscommunication, which can only increase the stress level," Beck wrote in the post.
ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
October 7, 2013 | By Jim Puzzanghera
WASHINGTON -- Defense giant Lockheed Martin Corp. said Monday it would reduce its planned layoffs to 2,400, after the Pentagon recalled most of the civilian workers it had furloughed because of the partial federal government shutdown. The move came after United Technologies Corp. said Sunday it was canceling the planned layoff of 2,000 employees at its Sikorsky Aircraft Corp., because of the return of the Defense Department workers. Lockheed had announced Friday it would lay off 3,000 employees starting Monday due to the shutdown.
Advertisement
NEWS
August 28, 1988
The Navy announced it would begin random drug testing of selected civilian employees this fall. The service said its final plan for the tests had been signed Aug. 6 by Navy Secretary William L. Ball III and that 81,000 of the Navy's 337,000 civilian workers are being notified they will be subject to urinalysis testing for drugs. Although testing legally could begin as early as Oct. 6, the Navy does not plan to start the program until early November, said Lt. Ken Ross, a Navy spokesman.
NATIONAL
October 5, 2013 | By Lisa Mascaro and David S. Cloud
WASHINGTON - The urgency to end the government shutdown eased Saturday as the Pentagon said it would recall nearly all its furloughed civilian employees and House Republicans focused their attention to a broader budget battle with the White House. Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel's surprise announcement to call about 350,000 civilian defense workers back to work next week was expected to loosen pressure on Congress and the White House to quickly end the shutdown, which was in its fifth day Saturday.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 11, 1995 | JEFF McDONALD, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Word that the naval station at Point Mugu had been added Wednesday to a list of military bases recommended for closure spread quickly among the thousands who live and work at the sprawling center. Shock, disbelief and skepticism ruled the emotions of many Navy and civilian workers at the air weapons station.
NEWS
September 11, 1987 | Associated Press
The Transportation Department began its controversial random testing of employees for drugs Thursday as about 50 workers in safety related jobs provided urine samples, officials said. The testing, which is being challenged in court, is the first random drug testing of civilian government employees under an executive order from President Reagan.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 25, 1997 | LORENZA MUNOZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Nearly 200 civilian workers at the Naval Construction Battalion Center in Port Hueneme will be laid off due to budget shortfalls and a smaller workload, military officials announced Monday. By mid-October, 180 jobs--about 17% of the current civilian work force--will be eliminated. This year, the base faced a $9-million budget shortfall due to federal cuts in military spending and a loss of military contract work, Seabee officials said. Layoff notices will begin going out in May, officials said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 30, 1993 | TINA DAUNT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Ventura County Board of Supervisors on Tuesday reversed its decision to lay off 27 firefighters and abandoned a plan to levy a $110-a-year tax on homeowners in anticipation of dramatic losses in state funding. The supervisors said the firefighter layoffs and the parcel tax are no longer necessary because state legislators have agreed to spare fire districts from sharp funding cuts next fiscal year.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 24, 1995 | HUGO MARTIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a move designed to free up hundreds of police officers to fight crime on the streets of Los Angeles, the Clinton Administration announced Friday an $18.3-million allocation for computers and civilian staff for the city's police force.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 9, 2010 | By David Zahniser, Los Angeles Times
Worried about spiraling pension costs, seven members of the Los Angeles City Council called Friday for reductions in the benefits given to civilian workers and an increase in the retirement age from 55 to at least 60. The proposal, which could come up for a vote within two weeks, calls for most civilian city workers to contribute 2% of their salaries to pay for the healthcare provided to retired employees. Currently they pay nothing for that benefit, city officials said. The decrease in benefits would apply only to new hires, not existing employees.
NATIONAL
August 6, 2013 | By David S. Cloud
WASHINGTON - The Pentagon will furlough 650,000 civilian employees without pay for six days this year after months of warnings that mandatory budget cuts might idle defense workers for far longer, officials said Tuesday. Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel, who has vowed to help furloughed defense workers since he took over the Pentagon in February, said fewer furlough days became possible after officials found savings elsewhere in the military budget. In addition, Hagel said the ongoing U.S. withdrawal of combat troops and equipment from Afghanistan was proving less costly than anticipated, and money was shifted from Pentagon weapons acquisition accounts to help pay for personnel.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 22, 2013 | By David Zahniser, Los Angeles Times
Ten weeks before he leaves office, Los Angeles Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa on Monday offered a $7.7-billion budget that would begin reversing years of cuts to basic city services such as tree trimming and sidewalk repairs while avoiding employee layoffs and furloughs. Buoyed by an estimated $111-million uptick in revenue, Villaraigosa's spending plan for the coming year provides money to add 65 firefighters, purchase 533 new vehicles at the Los Angeles Police Department and trim an additional 35,000 trees - leaving the city on its most solid footing since it was engulfed in crisis five years ago. The mayor also offered a long-term blueprint for financial recovery that would require the city's elected officials to be far less generous to their public employees than he and the council were during his eight-year tenure.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 29, 2013 | By David Zahniser, Los Angeles Times
In a surprise move, a union that represents about 10,000 civilian workers at Los Angeles City Hall has called two top mayoral candidates back for more interviews, signaling it may bestow a pivotal endorsement five weeks before the election. The Service Employees International Union failed to back any of the four leading contenders in the March 5 mayoral election after they appeared at a closed-door union forum nearly two months ago. But both City Controller Wendy Greuel and City Councilman Eric Garcetti have been summoned to appear for a second round Tuesday and spend 45 minutes answering questions from members, union officials said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 25, 2012 | By Andrew Blankstein, Los Angeles Times
Nearly 160 civilian Los Angeles Police Department employees could be laid off by Jan. 1 in a plan by City Hall to address its budget deficit, according to an internal department website posting obtained by The Times. LAPD Chief Charlie Beck said jobs targeted for elimination under a previous proposal from City Hall are one police administrator III, 10 secretaries, 81 senior clerk typists, 66 clerk typists and a nutritionist. "I know this is a very stressful time for all and I want to avoid rumors and miscommunication, which can only increase the stress level," Beck wrote in the post.
OPINION
September 25, 2012
The City Council on Tuesday will consider a sharp rollback in pensions for newly hired employees, offering them lower benefits with less financial help from the city. Unlike the reforms recently adopted in San Diego, San Jose and the state Legislature, the proposal the council is mulling wouldn't touch current employees' benefits. So in a way, it's solving a future problem, not the one the city faces right now. Nevertheless, if the city's pension benefits aren't sustainable, it doesn't make sense to offer them to the next generation of employees.
OPINION
April 24, 2011
Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa's proposed budget for the coming fiscal year is imbued with his trademark optimism, but it also carries an implicit threat. The optimism is seen in the mayor's determination not to lay off workers or scale back the reach of city government in spite of a projected shortfall of almost $458 million, or 10% of the city's expected general fund revenue. The threat is that if city workers don't agree to cover more of the cost of their retirement benefits, many will be hit with furloughs that make a significantly deeper cut in their take-home pay. About 19,000 members of six city unions are voting now on a proposed contract amendment that would raise their retirement contributions instead of imposing furloughs, and they should endorse it. But even if they do, that probably won't be enough to spare the city more budget heartache down the road.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 21, 2011 | By David Zahniser, Los Angeles Times
Los Angeles Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa unveiled a $6.9-billion budget Wednesday that, despite lethargic tax revenues amid a struggling economy, expands an array of city services. The proposal for the 2011-12 fiscal year calls for eliminating a $457-million shortfall while increasing pothole repairs by 20%, restoring one day of library service cut last year and putting an end to rotating staff reductions at the Fire Department. Those changes would occur as the city continues hiring enough officers to maintain existing staffing levels at the Los Angeles Police Department, according to the plan.
NATIONAL
April 17, 2009 | T. Christian Miller and Doug Smith
Civilian workers who suffered devastating injuries while supporting the U.S. war effort in Iraq and Afghanistan have come home to a grinding battle for basic medical care, artificial limbs, psychological counseling and other services. The insurance companies responsible for their treatment under taxpayer-funded policies have routinely denied the most serious medical claims.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 21, 2011 | By David Zahniser, Los Angeles Times
Los Angeles Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa unveiled a $6.9-billion budget Wednesday that, despite lethargic tax revenues amid a struggling economy, expands an array of city services. The proposal for the 2011-12 fiscal year calls for eliminating a $457-million shortfall while increasing pothole repairs by 20%, restoring one day of library service cut last year and putting an end to rotating staff reductions at the Fire Department. Those changes would occur as the city continues hiring enough officers to maintain existing staffing levels at the Los Angeles Police Department, according to the plan.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 3, 2011 | By David Zahniser, Los Angeles Times
Looking to cut costs in the middle of a budget crisis, Los Angeles Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa called Wednesday for an increase in the retirement age for civilian city workers and an immediate freeze on healthcare subsidies paid to retired police officers and firefighters. Villaraigosa said he would work with the council to boost the retirement age for newly hired civilian employees ? such as librarians, park workers and 911 operators ? to 65. Workers currently can retire at 55 if they have worked 33 years.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|