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WORLD
March 11, 2014 | By Sergei L. Loiko
MOSCOW -- Ukraine is on the verge of civil war, warned ousted President Viktor Yanukovich, who reemerged in the Russian southern city of Rostov-on-the-Don to make a statement more than a week after his first news conference in Russia. His statement came as Moscow reportedly reinforced its forces in the Ukrainian region of Crimea and held new military exercises. In Crimea, the regional parliament declared independence ahead of a referendum planned for Sunday, when the peninsula's voters are to decide whether they want to join Russia.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 11, 2014 | By Samantha Schaefer
Last year, a couple walking the usual route around their California Gold Country property happened upon a can sticking out of the ground. They pulled it out and uncovered seven others, all filled with hundreds of U.S. gold coins. Experts announced the find last month after a year of work researching and authenticating the 1,427 coins, worth an estimated $10 million. But the origin of the Saddle Ridge hoard remains a tantalizing mystery, one that has coin buffs and amateur sleuths on the case.
OPINION
March 4, 2014 | By Lorie Graham
"Does it stay on all the time or does it come off?" Ahmed asked from his hospital bed, frowning at the thought of a prosthetic leg. "I want one that doesn't come off. " These are the words of a 12-year-old boy, an innocent victim of a brutal regime and an international system that has in too many ways failed the people of Syria. My own 13-year-old, reading these words in the newspaper, asks whether there is something that can be done to help. I begin my usual "It's complicated" - there are legal constraints, there is the lack of political will - but seeing the look in my son's eyes, I say instead, "Yes there is. " The U.N. Security Council, and its permanent members in particular, could take bolder action, working in good faith toward delivering on the promise of the U.N. Charter: "To save succeeding generations from the scourge of war, and to reaffirm faith in fundamental human rights, [and]
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 3, 2014 | By Robin Abcarian
Do yourself a favor: If you care about American politics and race relations and you haven't already seen “12 Years a Slave,” go see it. You will not be sorry. The brutal tale of a 19th century American black man's descent from freedom into slavery deservedly won the best picture Oscar on Sunday. But it hasn't done nearly as well at the American box office as it should have. It has grossed about $49 million in the United States, a relatively modest amount compared with multi-Oscar winner “Gravity,” which has taken in close to $270 million domestically.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 28, 2014 | By Richard Winton
A Santa Monica jury has awarded a female news producer $5.42 million after finding that a West Hollywood nightclub was negligent in the sexual assault on her in a club restroom. The 43-year-old woman sued the Here Lounge and club worker Victor Cruz, saying that she was assaulted and raped by him March 23, 2009. The Times is not identifying her because she is a victim of a sex crime. After a 15-day trial in Santa Monica Superior Court, jurors found that Cruz committed a sexual offense that harmed the woman and that Here Lounge's negligence was a substantial factor in causing that harm.
BUSINESS
February 26, 2014 | By David Undercoffler
In a rare public apology, General Motors acknowledged Tuesday that it reacted too slowly to a safety issue linked to 13 deaths. The delayed response could cost GM tens of millions of dollars in civil penalties if the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration determines the automaker neglected to inform regulators. NHTSA is also facing criticism for not demanding that GM act more quickly to recall more than 1.6 million vehicles. The recall is linked to the cars' ignition switches, which GM says can be accidentally turned from the "run" position to the "accessory" position while the car is being driven.
NEWS
February 22, 2014 | Bill Plaschke
SOCHI, Russia -- They had stood crammed together against metal barriers for nearly two hours in the gusting cold, strangers squeezed into neighbors, a mass of wildly varied dialects and different colored flags. The temperature dropped, the wind grew, but they would not leave. The program on the giant stage dragged on, but the crowd only thickened, thousands gathering at the Olympics Medal Plaza on Saturday night for different reasons, all seemingly sticking around for the same thing.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 13, 2014 | By Robert Lloyd, Los Angeles Times Television Critic
Comedian Sid Caesar, who died Wednesday at the age of 91, was a giant and genius of television. He came into the medium, in 1949, when it was still molten. He helped shape TV comedy, even as TV, with its new technical demands and advantages, shaped his work. Milton Berle, the man called Mr. Television, had started in TV the year before; but Berle, 14 years Caesar's senior and in vaudeville since age 12, was already an old pro. Caesar, whose television debut was in fact on Berle's "Texaco Star Theater," was a fast-rising newcomer, much of whose previous work had been under the auspices of the Coast Guard.
BUSINESS
February 10, 2014 | By Jerry Hirsch
Here's how Toyota Motor Corp. plans to finally put the sudden-acceleration issue to rest: Pull out the checkbook. The automaker is reportedly close to paying a $1-billion fine to settle a four-year federal criminal investigation into whether it properly reported safety complaints to regulators. Meanwhile, Toyota's lawyers are in settlement talks over hundreds of civil lawsuits alleging wrongful deaths or injuries, potentially adding hundreds of millions to the tab. Previously, Toyota agreed to pay $1.6 billion to settle a class-action case brought by thousands of Toyota owners who contended that sudden-acceleration problems damaged the value of their vehicles.
Los Angeles Times Articles
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