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ENTERTAINMENT
December 26, 1997 | HOWARD ROSENBERG
Media monster 007 . . . You might say that Elliot Carver--the latest power-mad super fiend to foolishly challenge James Bond--is an old-fashioned reporter who'll do anything to get a story. Even create it himself. "I'm having fun with my headlines," global media scum Carver (Jonathan Pryce) blithely tells a subordinate in the just-released "Tomorrow Never Dies."
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 26, 1990 | Thomas H. Maugh II, Times science writer Thomas H. Maugh II reports from New Orleans at the meeting of the American Assn . for the Advancement of Science. and
Modern fantasies about early native Americans living in harmony with nature are just that--fantasies, according to anthropologist Timothy Kohler of Washington State University. He has found that the prehistoric Anasazi of northwestern New Mexico and southwestern Colorado significantly altered the plant and animal mixes near their settlements. The effect on the environment occurred through wood harvesting for fuel and construction, field clearing and burning.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 4, 2000
Humans began camping on the shore and eating seafood at least 125,000 years ago, about 10,000 years earlier than previously believed, according to an international team of archeologists. The team reports in today's Nature that they found Paleolithic hand axes and obsidian flakes and blades on a fossil reef terrace on the Red Sea coast of Eritrea. The reef terrace is about six miles long and 18 to 42 feet below sea level.
NEWS
May 25, 1990 | JAMES M. GOMEZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Flake by painstaking flake, the sloping skull of a long-extinct whale emerged from an eight-foot-long cocoon of sedimentary earth and plaster of Paris. "I don't want to chip any of the fragile bone away," said Marian Meyer quietly as she scraped at the partially exposed fossil that sat on a pallet in the back room of RMW Paleontologists, a small research company in a light-industrial complex on Via Fabricante in Mission Viejo.
NEWS
November 18, 1991 | GARRY ABRAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As a budding anthropologist, Jack Weatherford went to Kahl, Germany, to study the impact of an atomic power plant on the 2,000-year-old town. He figured the technological behemoth was the biggest thing to happen there since the Roman Empire sent its legions into the dark forests of Central Europe. Instead, in this unlikely setting, he discovered the American Indians and their often-overlooked contributions to the world--including the daily life of an obscure German village.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 30, 1990 | LEN HALL
What began as a construction project turned into an impromptu history lesson when workers unearthed an assortment of Indian artifacts on the playground of San Juan Elementary School. An assortment of 50 to 75 items, including shells, tile, fragments of bone and stone tools, were dug out of 20 holes about four feet deep, said Nick Magalousis, director of the nearby Mission San Juan Capistrano Museum, who was called to the school to help.
NEWS
May 9, 1997 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A handful of squash seeds and a bit of rind from a Mexican cave are rewriting the saga of one of the most important turning points in the history of humans in the Americas--the development of farming. Dating of the seeds indicates that domestic cultivation of plants in this hemisphere began about 10,000 years ago--more than 4,000 years earlier than scientists had believed.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 18, 1991 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, TIMES SCIENCE WRITER
Let's face it. Accountants are not universally loved in our society, especially now that income tax time is nearing and a depressed economy is forcing the "bean counters" to make drastic cuts in budgets of all kinds. It may, then, come as a big surprise that accountants are responsible for two of the most basic concepts that provide the underpinning of modern society: the development of writing and the ability to use numbers in complex mathematical manipulations.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 29, 2012 | By Steve Chawkins, Los Angeles Times
The yellowing government survey map of San Nicolas Island dated from 1879, but it was quite clear: There was a big black dot on the southwest coast and, next to it, the words "Indian Cave. " For more than 20 years, Navy archaeologist Steve Schwartz searched for that cave. It was believed to be home to the island's most famous inhabitant, a Native American woman who survived on the island for 18 years, abandoned and alone, and became the inspiration for "Island of the Blue Dolphins," one of the 20th century's most popular novels for young readers.
OPINION
January 19, 2014 | By John McWhorter
Few things stick out more in black American speech than the pronunciation of "ask" as "ax. " And when I say that it "sticks out," I'm being polite. Attitudes about Ebonics have evolved somewhat as hip hop has become America's favorite music. Even the strictest grammarian would have to agree that Kanye West's "Gold Digger" in standard English wouldn't be worth hearing. And Americans from Jesse Pinkman in "Breaking Bad" to Key and Peele get that it's OK to speak "hood" when you're among friends.
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