Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsClacks
IN THE NEWS

Clacks

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
April 29, 2000 | K. CONNIE KANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Eight years after hundreds of Korean Americans lost their life savings in the fire and fury of the Los Angeles riots, a growing number of merchants are returning to South-Central and nearby areas, scenes of some of the worst firebombings and lootings. Memories and scars of the riots' devastation still linger, the images of those nightmarish days indelibly etched in the Korean American psyche in the term sa-ee-gu, meaning 4/29--or April 29, the start of the riots.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
June 8, 2012 | By Megan Garvey
"Car Talk," the venerable NPR program featuring brothers Ray and Tom Magliozzi, a.k.a. Click and Clack, is calling it quits -- at least as far as live shows go. The Boston-based brothers, who turned their experience as mechanics into one of public radio's most beloved programs,  informed listeners Friday morning with their signature winking style in a blog post titled: "Time to Get Even Lazier. " "The good news is that, despite our general incompetence, we actually remembered to hit the 'record' button every week for the last 25 years," Tom Magliozzi said, adding that the show will continue in reruns pulled from more than 1,200 programs, beginning in October.
Advertisement
SPORTS
January 7, 1998 | Times News Services
Texas guard Kris Clack, the Longhorns' leading scorer, will be out two to four weeks because of a sprained knee ligament. Clack, who hasn't missed a game in more than two seasons at Texas, is averaging 16.6 points, 3.1 assists and 2.6 steals in 11 games.
NATIONAL
June 8, 2012 | By Rene Lynch
"Click and Clack," the mechanics-turned-comedians who launched one of the most unlikely -- and most beloved -- talk shows in radio history, have decided that 35 years at the wheel is enough. Brothers Tom and Ray Magliozzi announced Thursday afternoon that they will no longer record new episodes of the weekly call-in series, but it will continue to live on in syndication. The loss of the popular public radio show is a blow to NPR, and its listeners. The show was one of NPR's powerhouse performers, in part because it appealed to such a diverse audience.
SPORTS
February 4, 1997 | From Associated Press
Kris Clack scored 13 points in a decisive 19-0 run midway through the second half as Texas defeated No. 23 Texas Tech, 83-67, in a Big 12 Conference game Monday night at Austin, Texas. Texas Tech, 13-6 overall and 5-4 in the Big 12, has lost three straight. It trailed, 51-50, with 10:31 left before Texas (12-7, 6-3) went on its run. No.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 8, 2012 | By Megan Garvey
"Car Talk," the venerable NPR program featuring brothers Ray and Tom Magliozzi, a.k.a. Click and Clack, is calling it quits -- at least as far as live shows go. The Boston-based brothers, who turned their experience as mechanics into one of public radio's most beloved programs,  informed listeners Friday morning with their signature winking style in a blog post titled: "Time to Get Even Lazier. " "The good news is that, despite our general incompetence, we actually remembered to hit the 'record' button every week for the last 25 years," Tom Magliozzi said, adding that the show will continue in reruns pulled from more than 1,200 programs, beginning in October.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 17, 1990 | ELIZABETH MEHREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Moments before they were scheduled to go on the air at the studios of WBUR-FM here, Tom and Ray Magliozzi were sitting at a conference table, poring over the latest truckload of mail. Tom was eating a sweet roll, and large crumbs had established themselves in his thick gray beard. Abruptly, he looked up with what at first sounded suspiciously like a Serious Question. "Is Pro Bono Sonny Bono's other child?"
NEWS
November 1, 1987 | ESTHER SCHRADER, Times Staff Writer
Of many things in Patrick Reagh's print shop, perhaps most notable is what is missing: any evidence of the second half of the 20th Century. In one corner of the shop on Gardena Avenue in Glendale, an Elrod machine designed a century ago heats molten lead to 800 degrees. In another corner, the smooth whir of a big Heidelberg cylinder press underscores the noisy clacking and banging of a Colt's Armory press and a monotype caster.
NATIONAL
June 8, 2012 | By Rene Lynch
"Click and Clack," the mechanics-turned-comedians who launched one of the most unlikely -- and most beloved -- talk shows in radio history, have decided that 35 years at the wheel is enough. Brothers Tom and Ray Magliozzi announced Thursday afternoon that they will no longer record new episodes of the weekly call-in series, but it will continue to live on in syndication. The loss of the popular public radio show is a blow to NPR, and its listeners. The show was one of NPR's powerhouse performers, in part because it appealed to such a diverse audience.
MAGAZINE
April 12, 1987 | DAVID DEVOSS, David DeVoss is a Los Angeles Times Magazine staff writer.
ACROSS THE PACIFIC OCEAN, a never-ending war of maneuver is under way. It is a three-dimensional struggle--under sea, on the water and in the air--that pits the U.S. Navy against a Soviet fleet three times its size. The prize is control over half the world's surface. The weapons are multimillion-dollar ships and planes, as well as a vast array of sophisticated electronics that could provide the winning advantage if a conflict between the superpowers ever erupts.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 18, 2012 | By Martha Groves, Los Angeles Times
When Steve Soboroff gets one of them in his sights, he goes into what he calls "emergency overdrive. " He has been known to bug estate lawyers, hoping to move in and make an acquisition before someone else has the same idea. Sometimes, his enthusiasm gets the better of him. That's what happened when Walter Cronkite died in 2009 and Soboroff got a little too pushy too soon. PHOTOS: Typewriters click with history "Let the body cool off," huffed a lawyer for the famed TV anchor before hanging up. That one got away, but Soboroff, a Los Angeles real estate investor and civic leader, has bagged 15 others.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 15, 2006 | Robin Abcarian, Times Staff Writer
James Allan, whose red neon sign announcing his unusual profession beckons from the second-story window of a modest stucco building in Marina del Rey, is aware that he is one of the few guys left who actually types for a living. On an actual typewriter. A 14-year-old Panasonic KX-7000. Not that he doesn't prefer a computer, as he'll be the first to admit. "The typewriter's a nightmare," he says. "I really hate the thing."
HEALTH
March 14, 2005 | Ashley Powers, Times Staff Writer
This is one way to work off a Guinness. Our instructor calls it a reel. There is jumping and kicking and stepping -- eight times in a circle -- and I would say it is tricky except the ponytailed pipsqueaks in my class are reeling just fine. The four adult neophytes in this Irish dance class are shipped to another room to rehearse; my friend Susannah dubs it the "loser room," though we are both relieved. This is tough.
NEWS
April 29, 2000 | K. CONNIE KANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Eight years after hundreds of Korean Americans lost their life savings in the fire and fury of the Los Angeles riots, a growing number of merchants are returning to South-Central and nearby areas, scenes of some of the worst firebombings and lootings. Memories and scars of the riots' devastation still linger, the images of those nightmarish days indelibly etched in the Korean American psyche in the term sa-ee-gu, meaning 4/29--or April 29, the start of the riots.
SPORTS
January 7, 1998 | Times News Services
Texas guard Kris Clack, the Longhorns' leading scorer, will be out two to four weeks because of a sprained knee ligament. Clack, who hasn't missed a game in more than two seasons at Texas, is averaging 16.6 points, 3.1 assists and 2.6 steals in 11 games.
SPORTS
February 4, 1997 | From Associated Press
Kris Clack scored 13 points in a decisive 19-0 run midway through the second half as Texas defeated No. 23 Texas Tech, 83-67, in a Big 12 Conference game Monday night at Austin, Texas. Texas Tech, 13-6 overall and 5-4 in the Big 12, has lost three straight. It trailed, 51-50, with 10:31 left before Texas (12-7, 6-3) went on its run. No.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 18, 2012 | By Martha Groves, Los Angeles Times
When Steve Soboroff gets one of them in his sights, he goes into what he calls "emergency overdrive. " He has been known to bug estate lawyers, hoping to move in and make an acquisition before someone else has the same idea. Sometimes, his enthusiasm gets the better of him. That's what happened when Walter Cronkite died in 2009 and Soboroff got a little too pushy too soon. PHOTOS: Typewriters click with history "Let the body cool off," huffed a lawyer for the famed TV anchor before hanging up. That one got away, but Soboroff, a Los Angeles real estate investor and civic leader, has bagged 15 others.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 2, 1988
The clickety-clack that has mesmerized generations of train travelers is becoming a thing of the past--at least on a 107-mile stretch of track from Fullerton to San Diego. Workers have started replacing the old track with a new seamless variety that will smooth out and speed up the ride while lessening the likelihood of mishaps, a railway spokesman said.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 17, 1990 | ELIZABETH MEHREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Moments before they were scheduled to go on the air at the studios of WBUR-FM here, Tom and Ray Magliozzi were sitting at a conference table, poring over the latest truckload of mail. Tom was eating a sweet roll, and large crumbs had established themselves in his thick gray beard. Abruptly, he looked up with what at first sounded suspiciously like a Serious Question. "Is Pro Bono Sonny Bono's other child?"
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 2, 1988
The clickety-clack that has mesmerized generations of train travelers is becoming a thing of the past--at least on a 107-mile stretch of track from Fullerton to San Diego. Workers have started replacing the old track with a new seamless variety that will smooth out and speed up the ride while lessening the likelihood of mishaps, a railway spokesman said.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|