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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 24, 2014 | By Tony Perry
  SAN DIEGO -- A lawyer for 25 strippers has filed a claim with City Hall asserting that police violated the strippers' rights by detaining them and forcing them to pose for pictures. Dan Gilleon, attorney for dancers at Cheetahs Gentlemen's Club, which bills itself as the city's top spot for nude entertainment, said the strippers' rights were violated by an estimated 10 officers who arrived at the club recently for what was said to be a routine inspection. The claim, filed Monday, is a forerunner to a lawsuit.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 21, 2014 | By Howard Blume
Genethia Hudley-Hayes is a contender to return to the Los Angeles Board of Education seat she formerly held and can claim many accomplishments. But an MBA that can't be verified has magnified other resume problems, including an inaccurate description of an honorary doctorate. These issues have become fodder for an opponent, undermining a long record of public service. On her resume, Hudley-Hayes lists an MBA with emphasis on nonprofit management from a joint program of San Jose State and the Los Angeles-based Center for Nonprofit Management.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 20, 2014 | By Howard Blume
The contest to head the nation's second-largest teachers union will go to a second round, pitting challenger Alex Caputo-Pearl against incumbent Warren Fletcher, who finished a distant second in the initial race, according to results released Thursday. Caputo-Pearl, 45, received 48% of the votes and Fletcher 21%. In the vote-by-mail election, 7,158 members of United Teachers Los Angeles returned ballots, about 23% of those eligible to vote. Fewer than one in four voters supported the one-term incumbent.
WORLD
March 19, 2014 | By Robyn Dixon
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa -- A police ballistics expert at the murder trial of South African Olympic athlete Oscar Pistorius on Wednesday rejected the athlete's assertion that he fired two sets of rapid gunshots when he killed his girlfriend, testifying that her wounds made such a claim impossible. Pistorius fired four gunshots through a closed bathroom door, but Reeva Steenkamp's wounds were not consistent with the results of so-called “double taps,” said Capt. Chris Mangena, a prosecution witness.
BUSINESS
March 19, 2014 | By Chris O'Brien
In a sharply worded letter released Wednesday,  Mike Lynch, former chief executive of Autonomy, has accused Hewlett-Packard of misleading shareholders about the accounting problems it claimed to have uncovered at the British company it acquired in 2011. HP Chief Executive Meg Whitman announced in November 2012 that the company was taking a $5-billion write-down after a whistle-blower had alerted them to widespread fraud at Autonomy. The company referred the matter to a number of U.S. and British regulatory authorities.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 19, 2014 | By Carolyn Kellogg
Kevin Trudeau, the television pitchman who has been both successful and suspect, was sentenced to 10 years in prison Monday for making false claims, Reuters reports . Trudeau was found found guilty of criminal contempt in November in Chicago. The claims in question were made in Trudeau's book "The Weight Loss Cure 'They' Don't Want You To Know About" and the television spots that promoted it. In sentencing Trudeau, Judge Ronald Guzman said, "He is deceitful to the very core, and that type of conduct simply cannot stand.
OPINION
March 18, 2014 | By David H. Gans
Are secular, for-profit corporations free to violate the rights of their employees by claiming that the law violates their corporate religious conscience? That's the big question at the heart of the two blockbuster challenges to a key provision of Obamacare that will be heard by the Supreme Court next week. In its 225-year history, the Supreme Court has never held that secular, for-profit corporations are entitled to the free exercise of religion. It should not start now. Hobby Lobby and Conestoga Wood claim in their lawsuits that the Affordable Care Act's requirement that employers' health insurance plans cover preventive care for women, including the full range of FDA-approved contraceptives, violates their right to the free exercise of religion.
NATIONAL
March 17, 2014 | By Tina Susman
NEW YORK -- The self-proclaimed architect of the Sept. 11, 2001, attacks says a former Al Qaeda spokesman on trial in New York may have been "an eloquent, spell-binding speaker" who urged attacks on America, but he was not the high-level terrorist that prosecutors allege. In fact, Khalid Shaikh Mohammed, who was one of Al Qaeda's top organizers of terrorist operations, portrays Sulaiman abu Ghaith as a little-known figure who would never have been privy to details of upcoming attacks on Western targets.
BUSINESS
March 17, 2014 | By Chris O'Brien
Dorian Satoshi Nakamoto of Temple City, the man recently named by Newsweek as the mysterious creator of bitcoin, has hired a law firm and issued a statement late Sunday night in what he says was an attempt to "clear my name. " The statement came in an email from Ethan D. Kirschner, a Los Angeles lawyer.  "This firm has been retained by Dorian S. Nakamoto, the subject of the recent Newsweek cover story on Bitcoin," Kirschner said in an email. "He has issued the attached prepared statement.
BUSINESS
March 16, 2014 | Liz Weston, Money Talk
Dear Liz: I am 55 and my wife is 65. She only worked a few part-time jobs as she spent most of her working years raising our nine beautiful children. My question is, since she does not have enough credits to collect Social Security on her own work record, can she claim spousal benefits on my work history? If so, at what age and how will it affect my benefits? Answer: Your wife can receive spousal benefits based on your work record, but those checks can't start until you're old enough to qualify for benefits at age 62 (when she's 72)
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