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Clair George

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NEWS
November 20, 1992 | ROBERT L. JACKSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A federal court jury received the perjury case against former CIA official Clair E. George late Thursday after a prosecutor told jurors that George had lied to congressional investigators about his extensive knowledge of Iran-Contra matters. "He had sent information over to the national security adviser at the White House, but I guess the information was not good enough to tell the Congress of the United States," prosecutor Craig Gillen said sarcastically.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 19, 2011 | By Dennis McLellan, Los Angeles Times
Clair E. George, a former CIA covert operations chief who received a presidential pardon in 1992 after being convicted of two counts of lying to Congress in connection with the Iran-Contra scandal during the Reagan administration, has died. He was 81. George, a 32-year veteran of the CIA who lived in Chevy Chase, Md., died of cardiac arrest Aug. 11 at Suburban Hospital in Bethesda, Md., said his daughter Leslie George. George's career in espionage took him to agency stations around the globe and culminated with his becoming the CIA's third-highest-ranking official.
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NEWS
March 6, 1992 | RONALD J. OSTROW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A federal judge Thursday rejected a request by former high-ranking CIA official Clair E. George for millions of documents to defend himself against Iran-Contra charges, saying that George wanted "to search for a needle in a haystack of the country's most classified secrets." George failed to give "the slightest indication of what the needle might be and how it might be material to his defense," U.S. District Judge Royce C. Lamberth said.
NEWS
December 26, 1992 | ROBERT L. JACKSON and RONALD J. OSTROW, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
In a marked difference with many Democrats in Congress, two Democratic leaders--House Speaker Thomas S. Foley of Washington and defense secretary nominee Les Aspin of Wisconsin--had assured President Bush they would support his decision to pardon former Defense Secretary Caspar W. Weinberger, The Times has learned.
NEWS
July 15, 1991 | MICHAEL ROSS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
His life, until last week, could have been spun from the pages of a John le Carre novel. Variously described as brilliant, witty, vain, impatient and--above all--brave, Clair George was the consummate spy, an engaging man who was just as familiar with the back alleys of Beirut as with the corridors of power in Washington.
NEWS
September 6, 1991 | From Associated Press
Iran-Contra prosecutors plan to ask a grand jury today to issue an indictment against retired CIA official Clair E. George that will accuse him of trying to cover up the CIA's role in the Iran-Contra scandal, three sources close to the case said Thursday night. If such an indictment is approved, it likely will say that George concealed his knowledge of the diversion of Iran arms sale profits to the rebels of Nicaragua and hid former White House aide Oliver L.
NEWS
July 30, 1992 | RONALD J. OSTROW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A former CIA official wept Wednesday as he testified that Clair E. George, once the agency's third-highest official, successfully recommended him for two agency awards during the period in which, he said, the two men tried to cover up their knowledge of the Iran-Contra affair. The dramatic testimony by Alan D. Fiers demonstrated the high emotions that gripped some officials of the CIA as the Iran-Contra secrets began to unfold.
NEWS
July 25, 1992 | RONALD J. OSTROW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Clair E. George, the former CIA covert actions chief accused of lying and obstruction to thwart Iran-Contra investigations, is instead the victim of "a witness who is an admitted liar" and biased inquiries by hypocritical members of Congress, his lawyer said in an opening statement at his trial Friday. But prosecutor Craig A.
OPINION
July 26, 1992 | James Bamford, James Bamford, author of "The Puzzle Palace," an analysis of the National Security Agency, is the Washington investigative producer for ABC's "World News Tonight With Peter Jennings."
Six years ago, in a large, packed room in Washington, Clair George took his seat at a heavy wooden table in front of John Kerry (D-Mass.). Behind a pair of spectacles, the white-haired, craggy-faced George could have passed for an investment banker or a corporate lawyer, which he almost became. In fact, he was the nation's chief spymaster: deputy director for operations of the Central Intelligence Agency. Seated behind the witness table in the hearing room of the Senate Foreign Relations committee, George listened as Kerry questioned him about the secret--and illegal--flights to resupply the Nicaraguan Contra rebels.
NEWS
December 10, 1992 | ROBERT L. JACKSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A federal court jury convicted Clair E. George, the highest-ranking former CIA official charged in the Iran-Contra scandal, on two perjury charges Wednesday. After deliberating for nearly 11 days, the jurors acquitted George of five other charges in his monthlong retrial. A court clerk reading the verdicts aloud announced three consecutive "not guilty" findings before reaching the first "guilty" verdict. George, 62, flinched at the word. The clerk quickly announced a second "guilty."
NEWS
December 25, 1992 | From Reuters
Following is independent counsel Lawrence Walsh' statement on the presidential pardon of former Defense Secretary Caspar W. Weinberger and others charged in the Iran-Contra scandal: President Bush's pardon of Caspar Weinberger and other Iran-Contra defendants undermines the principle that no man is above the law. It demonstrates that powerful people with powerful allies can commit serious crimes in high office--deliberately abusing the public trust--without consequence.
NEWS
December 25, 1992 | From Associated Press
Following is the text of President Bush's statement pardoning former Defense Secretary Caspar W. Weinberger and others in the Iran-Contra investigation: Today I am exercising my power under the Constitution to pardon former Secretary of Defense Caspar Weinberger and others for their conduct related to the Iran-Contra affair.
NEWS
December 25, 1992 | ROBERT L. JACKSON and RONALD J. OSTROW, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
President Bush granted Christmas Eve pardons to former Defense Secretary Caspar W. Weinberger and five other former government officials Thursday, wiping out all pending criminal prosecutions in the Iran-Contra case. In an angry statement, the Iran-Contra independent counsel, Lawrence E. Walsh, accused Bush of "misconduct" and declared that the pardon was part of the cover-up that "has continued for more than six years."
NEWS
December 10, 1992 | ROBERT L. JACKSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A federal court jury convicted Clair E. George, the highest-ranking former CIA official charged in the Iran-Contra scandal, on two perjury charges Wednesday. After deliberating for nearly 11 days, the jurors acquitted George of five other charges in his monthlong retrial. A court clerk reading the verdicts aloud announced three consecutive "not guilty" findings before reaching the first "guilty" verdict. George, 62, flinched at the word. The clerk quickly announced a second "guilty."
NEWS
December 3, 1992 | From Associated Press
Jurors tried to deliver a partial verdict Wednesday in the Iran-Contra case of former CIA spy chief Clair E. George but they were told to complete deliberations before announcing a decision. The jury did not indicate how many of the seven counts it had decided in the case against George, who is accused of lying about the Iran-Contra affair. U.S. District Judge Royce C. Lamberth said that accepting a partial verdict would generate news coverage that might influence the jury's deliberations.
NEWS
November 20, 1992 | ROBERT L. JACKSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A federal court jury received the perjury case against former CIA official Clair E. George late Thursday after a prosecutor told jurors that George had lied to congressional investigators about his extensive knowledge of Iran-Contra matters. "He had sent information over to the national security adviser at the White House, but I guess the information was not good enough to tell the Congress of the United States," prosecutor Craig Gillen said sarcastically.
NEWS
August 8, 1992 | From Associated Press
Former CIA spymaster Clair E. George "purposely, willfully" concealed the fact that he had met arms middleman Richard V. Secord from senators investigating the Iran-Contra scandal, a former senator charged Friday. "When the question came up . . . he knew it all along. He never met Secord, he says, but we know he did," former Missouri Sen. Thomas F. Eagleton testified during George's criminal trial.
NEWS
October 14, 1992 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A federal judge dropped two of the nine criminal counts against Clair E. George, the former chief of CIA covert operations who faces a retrial next week in an Iran-Contra case. George originally was charged with covering up White House aide Oliver L. North's secret Contra resupply network and concealing his knowledge of the Ronald Reagan White House's arms sales to Iran. He remains charged with four counts of false statements, two perjury counts and one count of obstructing the grand jury.
NEWS
October 24, 1992 | ROBERT L. JACKSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Clair E. George, the highest-ranking former CIA official charged in the Iran-Contra scandal, should be judged innocent of perjury on grounds he "did not knowingly lie" to Congress six years ago, George's defense attorney told a federal court jury Friday. Defense attorney Richard A. Hibey made the claim as opposing lawyers presented opening statements in George's second trial on seven counts of perjury. His first trial ended in a hung jury Aug. 26.
NEWS
October 14, 1992 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A federal judge dropped two of the nine criminal counts against Clair E. George, the former chief of CIA covert operations who faces a retrial next week in an Iran-Contra case. George originally was charged with covering up White House aide Oliver L. North's secret Contra resupply network and concealing his knowledge of the Ronald Reagan White House's arms sales to Iran. He remains charged with four counts of false statements, two perjury counts and one count of obstructing the grand jury.
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