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Claire Maglica

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 13, 1994 | LEE ROMNEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
His voice hoarse and straining, flashlight mogul Anthony Maglica said Tuesday that he loved Claire Maglica and was always generous in their 23 years together as an unmarried couple, but that he never "made any commitments" to her. He asked jurors to "listen to his heart" as they judge him in the couple's palimony trial, where more than $150 million is at stake.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 2, 1994 | LEE ROMNEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Claire Maglica broke down on the witness stand Friday, tearfully remembering the day when the flashlight magnate who was her companion of 23 years told her she was neither his wife nor his business partner, but merely his "employee." After returning from a business trip in January, 1992, Claire Maglica said, she inadvertently learned that Anthony Maglica was trying to transfer company stock to his children from a previous marriage.
NEWS
April 1, 1994 | LEE ROMNEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The trial is a classic case of "he says, she says," but legal experts believe it could lead to the biggest palimony settlement ever in a case that is dripping with enough romantic intrigue, high finance and secrecy to hold captive an audience of courtroom TV watchers.
NEWS
April 1, 1994 | LEE ROMNEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The trial is a classic case of "he says, she says," but legal experts say it could lead to the biggest palimony settlement ever in a case that is dripping with enough romantic intrigue, high finance and secrecy to hold an audience of courtroom TV watchers captive.
NEWS
April 1, 1994 | RENE LYNCH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Sex, loads of money, spurned lovers. There's nothing quite like a star-studded palimony case. The term "palimony" was coined in the 1970s when Michelle Triola sued actor Lee Marvin, her former lover, contending that she was promised a share of his earnings in exchange for her wifelike duties over the years they lived together. A judge found there was no agreement to share Marvin's income, but a jury awarded Triola $104,000 to help her get back on her feet. Marvin appealed and won.
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