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Clara Bow

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HOME & GARDEN
July 12, 2011 | By Lauren Beale, Los Angeles Times
The onetime home of silent film star and early "it girl" Clara Bow has come on the market in Bel-Air at $6,995,000. Built in 1928, the Spanish-style house includes a ballroom, a rooftop deck and enclosed sleeping porches. The 8,900-square-foot main house has six bedrooms and 71/2 bathrooms. A newly built guesthouse with a bedroom and bathroom sits above the three-car garage. At nearly three-quarters of an acre, the lot has a swimming pool and a motor court. Bow, who died in 1965 at 60, epitomized the Roaring Twenties as a flapper and sex symbol.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
July 29, 2013
What was Clara Bow's first talkie? "The Wild Party" in 1929.
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ENTERTAINMENT
July 16, 2012
Sirens of the Silent Screen There were several actresses besides Louise Brooks who defined the Roaring '20s. Clara Bow With her short hair, kewpie doll lips and nonconformist lifestyle, Bow was nicknamed the "It" girl — in fact she also appeared in the hit film "It" as well as the Oscar-winning best film "Wings. " Mae Murray The blond silent screen star who had described herself as the "golden dragonfly," was known for her flamboyant performances on- and off-screen.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 27, 2013 | By Kenneth Turan, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
I love the smell of preservation in the morning. The rest of the day, too, if it comes to that. So it's a pleasure to announce that the UCLA Film and Television Archive's one-of-a-kind Festival of Preservation opens for business Friday night with a knockout new print of one of the killer classics of film noir, Joseph H. Lewis' "Gun Crazy. " It's too bad the concept of preservation has such a musty sound, because what it means in practice is that today's audiences can experience the most unusual, the most entertaining and exciting treasures from the entire range of cinema's past, all brought back to life by the archive's team of crack preservationists.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 12, 1999 | SUSAN KING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Clara Bow was the screen's first sex symbol--cinema's "It" girl who exuded sex appeal, enticement and excitement. But having "It" didn't bring her any real happiness. In fact, "It" ended up becoming a burden for Bow, who was never really embraced by Hollywood's elite because she was not perceived as a "serious" actress.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 18, 1996 | MICHAEL P. LUCAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Before Sharon Stone, before Madonna, before Monroe, before Harlow, before all of those, America's leading sex symbol was Clara Bow. The pouty redhead seduced audiences with a playful and somewhat vulnerable sex appeal. Bow's 1927 picture "It" opens the eighth annual "Silents Under the Stars" mini-festival Sunday at Paramount Ranch. On celluloid, her appeal continues to be strong enough to inspire a steady stream of fan mail, even though she died in 1965.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 26, 2002 | SUSAN KING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
At the Butterfield auction house in Los Angeles, a woman's voice is heard on a cassette recording pleading with her bird, Feisty, to talk. In her strong Brooklyn accent, she implores her pet to say something: "Pretty baaaby. Come on, pretty baaaby" The woman's voice is etched with pain and heartache, and the recording plays like a scene from Billy Wilder's "Sunset Boulevard."
ENTERTAINMENT
July 29, 2013
What was Clara Bow's first talkie? "The Wild Party" in 1929.
HOME & GARDEN
November 5, 2009 | By Lauren Beale
The Antonio Moreno estate, a 1930 mansion named for the film star who lived in it until 1935, has sold for $4.2 million. The Mediterranean Revival has a two-story living room, five separate bedroom wings and 7 1/2 bathrooms in 8,081 square feet. The home sits on more than half an acre in gated Laughlin Park in the Los Feliz area. There is a period kitchen, original tile bathrooms, a guesthouse and a recording/editing studio. The house and its two-story detached garage cost $27,300 to build during the Depression, according to Pasadena-based building biographer Tim Gregory.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 16, 2012
Sirens of the Silent Screen There were several actresses besides Louise Brooks who defined the Roaring '20s. Clara Bow With her short hair, kewpie doll lips and nonconformist lifestyle, Bow was nicknamed the "It" girl — in fact she also appeared in the hit film "It" as well as the Oscar-winning best film "Wings. " Mae Murray The blond silent screen star who had described herself as the "golden dragonfly," was known for her flamboyant performances on- and off-screen.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 7, 2012 | By Valerie J. Nelson, Los Angeles Times
One of the last links to the silent film era, Frederica Sagor Maas wrote the script for 1925's "The Plastic Age," which launched actress Clara Bow. But she watched in horror as her serious treatment on women and work was turned into a frivolous 1947 musical, "The Shocking Miss Pilgrim," starring Betty Grable. It was Maas' final Hollywood credit. Disgusted by the "shallow" industry, she and her screenwriter husband contemplated suicide before leaving the movie business altogether, she later wrote.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 6, 2011 | By Amy Kaufman, Los Angeles Times
Throughout his career, costume designer Mark Bridges has styled looks from diverse decades. For the 1970s-era "Boogie Nights," he outfitted Mark Wahlberg in denim bell bottoms. In "Blow," he found Johnny Depp '60s-inspired pocketed suits and turtlenecks to wear. And in last year's "Greenberg," he put Ben Stiller in a puffy vest and cable-knit sweater typical of a modern-day, middle-age slacker. But approaching the late 1920s was especially daunting for Bridges. For one, he knew it would prove difficult to track down actual materials from the period.
BUSINESS
October 27, 2011 | By Lauren Beale, Los Angeles Times
A Sherman Oaks home built in 1936 for actress Joyce Compton is on the market at $1.795 million. Evoking an English farmhouse with a half-timbered exterior, it features beamed ceilings, a stone fireplace in the living room and oak floors. The updated 3,306-square-foot house includes a den, a family room, three bedrooms and 31/2 bathrooms. There is a separate one-bedroom guesthouse and a swimming pool. Joyce Compton, who died in 1997 at 90, was in more than 200 films with such stars as Cary Grant, Jack Benny and Clara Bow. She appeared in "Christmas in Connecticut" (1945)
HOME & GARDEN
August 25, 2011 | By Lauren Beale, Los Angeles Times
Update: A former home of silent film star Clara Bow has sold for $6,375,000. The Spanish-style house in Bel-Air came on the market in early July at $6,995,000. Built in 1928, the Moorish-influenced residence includes a courtyard, a ballroom, a rooftop deck, enclosed sleeping porches, six bedrooms and 71/2 bathrooms in 8,900 square feet. A guesthouse with a bedroom and bathroom sits above the three-car garage for a total of 9,450 square feet of living space. At nearly three-quarters of an acre, the gated lot has a pool with a sun deck and a motor court.
BUSINESS
August 21, 2011 | By Mary Forgione
Technically, this multilevel house in the Los Feliz hills falls into the design category of Greek Revival, but just barely. "The architecture didn't feel to me like a Greek Revival house in the classic sense," says co-owner Ilene Kurtz-Kretzschmar, who has lived in the house for almost four years. "Those are so much more formal. This feels more like a Hollywood version. " And indeed it is. The house comes with a pedigree — L.A. Historic-Cultural Monument No. 301 — as a tribute to architect W.C. Tanner and the remarkable filmmaker Dorothy Arzner, who built it in 1930.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 5, 1999 | SUSAN KING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Moviegoers had never seen anybody quite like Clara Bow when she burst upon the scene in the mid-1920s. Unlike such popular and wholesome stars of the era as Mary Pickford, Bow was the epitome of sexual aggressiveness and liberation of the Roaring '20s. With her short hair, Kewpie doll lips and expressive eyes, Bow was cinema's first sex symbol. Her rise was meteoric and so was her descent.
HOME & GARDEN
November 5, 2009 | By Lauren Beale
The Antonio Moreno estate, a 1930 mansion named for the film star who lived in it until 1935, has sold for $4.2 million. The Mediterranean Revival has a two-story living room, five separate bedroom wings and 7 1/2 bathrooms in 8,081 square feet. The home sits on more than half an acre in gated Laughlin Park in the Los Feliz area. There is a period kitchen, original tile bathrooms, a guesthouse and a recording/editing studio. The house and its two-story detached garage cost $27,300 to build during the Depression, according to Pasadena-based building biographer Tim Gregory.
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