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Clarence Thomas

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 12, 2014 | Robin Abcarian
The new documentary about Anita Hill opens with a closeup of a telephone and a bizarre voice message: “Good morning, Anita Hill. It's Ginni Thomas, and I just wanted to reach across the air waves, and the years and ask you to consider something. I would love you to consider an apology sometime, and some full explanation of why you did what you did with my husband. So give it some thought, I certainly pray about this and hope one day you will help us understand why you did what you did. OK!
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 16, 2014 | By Robin Abcarian
The new documentary about Anita Hill opens with a close-up of a telephone and a bizarre voice mail message: "Good morning, Anita Hill. It's Ginni Thomas, and I just wanted to reach across the air waves, and the years and ask you to consider something. I would love you to consider an apology sometime, and some full explanation of why you did what you did with my husband. So give it some thought, I certainly pray about this and hope one day you will help us understand why you did what you did. OK!
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NEWS
June 26, 2013 | By Michael McGough
One of the most annoying habits of some of my liberal friends is their casual derogation of Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas. Thomas is derided not just as an extremist, which is true when you plot the legal philosophies of the justices along a spectrum, but also a clone of Antonin Scalia and an intellectual lightweight. The latter two accusations are just false. Thomas and Scalia have disagreed in significant cases, and Thomas' opinions, however idiosyncratic, are often tightly reasoned and provocative.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 12, 2014 | Robin Abcarian
The new documentary about Anita Hill opens with a closeup of a telephone and a bizarre voice message: “Good morning, Anita Hill. It's Ginni Thomas, and I just wanted to reach across the air waves, and the years and ask you to consider something. I would love you to consider an apology sometime, and some full explanation of why you did what you did with my husband. So give it some thought, I certainly pray about this and hope one day you will help us understand why you did what you did. OK!
OPINION
March 6, 2011 | By Jonathan Turley
Louis XIV of France was infamous for his view that there was no distinction between himself and the state, allegedly proclaiming "L'État, c'est moi" ("I am the State"). That notorious merging of personality with an institution was again on display in a February speech by Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas before the conservative Federalist Society. Thomas used the friendly audience to finally address a chorus of criticism over his alleged conflicts of interest and violation of federal disclosure rules concerning his wife's income.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 7, 1996
In "New Controversy for the Lone Justice" (May 30), you wrote: "Unlike the other justices, [Clarence] Thomas seldom gets invited to speak at prominent law schools or to teach summer school classes in Europe." In the past three years, the Valparaiso University School of Law has hosted three of the justices in our summer study program in Cambridge, England. In 1993, Justice Antonin Scalia lectured on the separation of powers. In 1994, Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg lectured on gender-based discrimination.
NATIONAL
January 14, 2013 | By David G. Savage
WASHINGTON - It's a slow news day at the U.S. Supreme Court when the biggest story is whether an overheard, offhand comment by Justice Clarence Thomas means he has broken his nearly seven-year streak of silence. Thomas has never liked asking questions during the court's oral arguments. He insists the justices should listen, rather than interrupt the advocates. He last asked a question on Feb. 22, 2006, and his silent streak has taken on a legendary significance. But Thomas is not entirely quiet.
NATIONAL
November 4, 2011 | By Robin Abcarian, Los Angeles Times
Like many high-profile black conservatives, Herman Cain has relished his role as a racial contrarian. Cain grew up in the segregated South and came of age during the struggles of the civil rights movement. Yet he bridles at the notion that because he is black, he should be a Democrat, or that he is some kind of race traitor because of his ultraconservative ideology. "I have been called 'Uncle Tom,' 'sellout,' 'Oreo,' 'shameless," Cain often tells his overwhelmingly white audiences as he seeks the Republican presidential nomination.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 10, 1991
Regarding your editorial "From the Marshall to the Thomas Seat" (July 2): I feel sorry for Clarence Thomas. He has been brainwashed to think white, not right. He sees blacks just like any other white bigot. He obviously can read, write and speak well, but his common sense has been replaced with the dogma of the conservative Establishment. What does it all mean? Nothing. We will overcome this one. LIONEL BAIN Los Angeles
NATIONAL
November 15, 2013 | By Timothy M. Phelps
WASHINGTON - During Supreme Court arguments, Justice Clarence Thomas sits mute, not asking a single question while his colleagues on the bench jockey to get in the next interrogatory. But this week, in front of 1,300 adoring conservative lawyers in a Washington hotel ballroom, another Clarence Thomas emerged: loquacious, folksy, irreverent, and totally at ease with his audience and himself. The result was a glimpse of the court's most controversial figure letting down his hair, talking candidly about not just his upbringing but his feelings and his approach toward judging.
NEWS
June 26, 2013 | By Michael McGough
One of the most annoying habits of some of my liberal friends is their casual derogation of Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas. Thomas is derided not just as an extremist, which is true when you plot the legal philosophies of the justices along a spectrum, but also a clone of Antonin Scalia and an intellectual lightweight. The latter two accusations are just false. Thomas and Scalia have disagreed in significant cases, and Thomas' opinions, however idiosyncratic, are often tightly reasoned and provocative.
NEWS
January 15, 2013 | By Michael McGough
Not since "Garbo Talks!" has a public figure's decision to speak attracted such attention. I'm referring, of course, to the media sensation created this week when Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas broke an almost seven-year-long silent streak to crack a joke during oral arguments in a case involving the adequacy of counsel in a Louisiana murder case. As The Times' David Savage reported, most of what Thomas said was drowned out by cross-talk, but apparently he had some fun with the idea that one of the lawyers in the case should be considered qualified because she attended Yale Law School, Thomas' alma mater but an institution about which he has mixed feelings.
NATIONAL
January 14, 2013 | By David G. Savage
WASHINGTON - It's a slow news day at the U.S. Supreme Court when the biggest story is whether an overheard, offhand comment by Justice Clarence Thomas means he has broken his nearly seven-year streak of silence. Thomas has never liked asking questions during the court's oral arguments. He insists the justices should listen, rather than interrupt the advocates. He last asked a question on Feb. 22, 2006, and his silent streak has taken on a legendary significance. But Thomas is not entirely quiet.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 12, 2013 | By Irene Lacher, Special to the Los Angeles Times
In the documentary "Anita," which premieres at the Sundance Film Festival in four sold-out screenings beginning Saturday, Academy Award-winning filmmaker Freida Mock focuses her lens on law professor Anita Hill (who hadn't yet seen the film at press time). More than 20 years after Hill accused then-Supreme Court nominee Clarence Thomas of sexual harassment in turbulent Senate Judiciary Committee hearings, Hill is an author, professor of social policy, law and women's studies at Brandeis University's Heller School of Social Policy and Management and a frequent speaker on sexual discrimination and civil rights.
NATIONAL
June 26, 2012 | By David Horsey
The first day of a big week for the third branch of government brought a ruling on Arizona's immigration law that was less than satisfying for Justice Antonin Scalia and the Rush Limbaugh wing of the U.S. Supreme Court. A five-vote majority that included Chief JusticeJohn G. Roberts Jr.struck down all but one provision of the controversial statute, asserting that the federal government has preeminent authority for setting immigration policy. They did leave intact the most controversial element of Arizona's disputed law -- the mandate placed on local police to determine the immigration status of anyone detained for other violations if there is reason to suspect that person is in the country illegally -- but they ruled that taking further steps to kick undocumented persons out of the country or to keep them from seeking work or require that they carry documentation of citizenship are not powers allocated to the states.  Scalia scoffed at this.
NEWS
June 4, 2012 | By Paul Whitefield
When can you be arrested for talking to someone? When can you be arrested for touching them? When the person you're talking to or touching is the vice president of the United States, it seems. On June 16, 2006, Steven Howards spotted Vice President Dick Cheney, who was coming out of a shopping mall in Beaver Creek, Colo., and chatting amiably with several people. Howards approached the vice president and allegedly pushed or touched him on the shoulder as he told him that his "policies on Iraq are disgusting.
NEWS
November 11, 2011 | By James Oliphant
For Herman Cain, the comparisons to Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas have shifted from implied to explicit after a joke the candidate made about Thomas accuser Anita Hill. According to Fox News, Cain was at a campaign event in Michigan on Thursday when someone in the crowd brought up Hill. Cain replied, laughing, “Is she going to endorse me?” ( Watch video below .) The group surrounding Cain - almost all men by the look of the video - guffawed. It was 20 years ago this year that Thomas was embroiled in a bitter fight on Capitol Hill after Hill emerged late in his confirmation process to accuse of him of sexual harassment.
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