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Clarence Thomas

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 25, 1995 | PAUL CRAIG ROBERTS, Paul Craig Roberts, former assistant Treasury secretary, is chairman of the Institute for Political Economy in Washington.
Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas does not like racial quotas, a view that earns him the disapproval of liberals and some black leaders, who think he looks a gift horse for his people in the mouth. The standard liberal line is to criticize Thomas for benefiting from racial quotas but opposing them for other blacks. His critics miss the point. Thomas realizes that the real problem is that blacks are still treated unequally.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 12, 1993 | CHRISTOPHER D. CAMERON, Christopher D. Cameron is associate professor of law at Southwestern University in Los Angeles, where he specializes in labor and employment matters.
Two weeks ago, Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas bowed out of a planned appearance before a convention of Concerned Women for America, a conservative organization that lobbies for prayer in the public schools and against legal abortion. Although the group strongly supported his confirmation to the court, Thomas apparently had second thoughts about delivering the "challenging message from his heart" advertised by convention organizers.
NEWS
March 17, 1992 | THOMAS B. ROSENSTIEL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A special Senate counsel investigating news leaks on Monday subpoenaed telephone records of the two reporters who broke the story last fall of Anita Faye Hill's allegations of sexual harassment against Supreme Court nominee Clarence Thomas. The two reporters and their news organizations, Timothy Phelps of Newsday and Nina Totenberg of National Public Radio, argued that the new order violates the First Amendment rights of a free press and is a politically dangerous abuse of senatorial power.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 14, 1991 | JUAN WILLIAMS, Juan Williams writes for the Washington Post
The phone calls came throughout September. Did Clarence Thomas ever take money from the South African government? Was he under orders from the Reagan White House when he criticized civil rights leaders? Did he beat his first wife? Did I know anything about expense account charges he filed for out-of-town speeches? Did he say that women don't want equal pay for equal work? And finally, one exasperated voice said: "Have you got anything on your tapes we can use to stop Thomas?"
NEWS
May 30, 1996 | DAVID G. SAVAGE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The lonely saga of Justice Clarence Thomas, the Supreme Court's only African American, took another odd turn Wednesday when he was forced to back out of a planned appearance at a suburban school because of protests from some black parents. The conservative justice "has done everything he can to undermine things that are important to people. . . . There's no place for Clarence Thomas anywhere in my district," said Kenneth E. Johnson, a school board member from Prince George's County, Md.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 8, 1991 | PATRICIA A. KING, Patricia A. King is a professor of law at Georgetown University Law Center
The Senate should not vote on a nomination as important as the Clarence Thomas one without investigating thoroughly Anita F. Hill's allegations that she was sexually harassed by Thomas. Hill, a black woman and a law professor at the University of Oklahoma, says that he used the power of his office to make what can only be described as lewd and lascivious inquiries of her when she was his young legal aide.
NEWS
July 15, 1991 | PAUL RICHTER and SAM FULWOOD III, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Economist Walter E. Williams still remembers the time he rose to speak on the need for black self-help and family values and was met by a hail of eggs and tomatoes. In 1982, when Joseph Perkins wrote an article in the Howard University student newspaper criticizing a campus protest, a professor denounced him in class as having composed "the worst fascist rantings since J. Edgar Hoover."
NEWS
February 5, 1990 | DAVID G. SAVAGE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Clarence Thomas is a 41-year-old, Yale-educated lawyer. He is articulate, conservative, a critic of affirmative action--and black. For all these reasons, Republicans see him as a star in the making. President Bush nominated him last year to a highly visible judgeship: the U.S. Court of Appeals seat in Washington last held by rejected Supreme Court nominee Robert H. Bork. On Tuesday, the Democratic-controlled Senate Judiciary Committee will consider his nomination.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 12, 1991 | JOHN LEWIS, Rep. John Lewis is a Democrat from Georgia
I have found Judge Clarence Thomas to be a hard-working, articulate and likable individual. His rise from an impoverished early life to the highest positions in our federal government has been impressive. However, I have decided to oppose his nomination to the U.S. Supreme Court. Some have said, "Well, at least he's black." That's not enough for me. He has got to be sensitive. Some have asked, "If not him, who?" That, to me, is not the issue.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 2, 1991 | ROSS K. BAKER, Ross K. Baker is a professor of political science at Rutgers University
Nothing of importance that a President does is without some strategic political calculation. Even the most humdrum campaign visit to the district of a freshman House member is laid on with a kind of meticulous sensitivity to terrain and disposition of forces that would have pleased the great Clausewitz.
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