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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 3, 1997
With reference to "An Educator's Legacy" (Education, Sept. 24), I was reminded of the dismay and disgust that I felt when Clark Kerr was dismissed as president of UC. Although I had voted for Ronald Reagan in 1966, I never voted for him again as governor or president. FRANCES H. HANDSAKER Redondo Beach
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NEWS
June 11, 2013 | By Peter Taylor
In arguing that the individual campuses of the University of California would be better served by having a looser relationship with a drastically downsized UC office of the president, UCLA history professor David Myers relies in part on the late Clark Kerr to make his case. In a May 31 Times Op-Ed article , Myers cites the former UC president's observation that the "university-wide system has no alumni, no students, no faculty, no sports teams, no one to cheer for it. " Myers' selective quotation doesn't actually reflect Kerr's broader view on this subject.
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OPINION
December 4, 2003 | Seth Rosenfeld, Seth Rosenfeld is a San Francisco Chronicle reporter. His report in the Chronicle, based on documents released as the result of his 17-year fight under the Freedom of Information Act, is available at sfgate.com/campus.
As president of the University of California during much of the tumultuous 1960s, Clark Kerr was confronted by students who reviled him as a symbol of the establishment and conservatives who vilified him for not cracking down on demonstrators. But he never suspected that his worst enemy was the FBI. Kerr, who died Monday at 92, seemed an unlikely target for FBI dirty tricks. He was a soft-spoken economist, an advisor to both Democratic and Republican presidents and an avowed anti-communist.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 21, 2004 | Rebecca Trounson, Times Staff Writer
Clark Kerr, the former University of California president and elder statesman of higher education, was remembered here Friday as a visionary whose dream of an affordable, high-quality college education for all Californians may now be at risk. At a simple, often poignant memorial service for Kerr, who died Dec.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 24, 1997
It has been 30 years since Clark Kerr, the 12th president of the University of California, was abruptly fired by the UC Board of Regents, who disagreed with how he had handled student protests on campus. "I left the presidency just as I entered it: Fired with enthusiasm," he quipped at the time. Today, Kerr, 86, is widely regarded as higher education's preeminent elder statesman, and he remains as enthusiastic as ever.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 21, 2004 | Rebecca Trounson, Times Staff Writer
Clark Kerr, the former University of California president and elder statesman of higher education, was remembered here Friday as a visionary whose dream of an affordable, high-quality college education for all Californians may now be at risk. At a simple, often poignant memorial service for Kerr, who died Dec.
BOOKS
March 16, 2003 | Jonathan Kirsch, Jonathan Kirsch, a contributing writer to Book Review, is a 1971 graduate of UC Santa Cruz.
For men and women of a certain age and experience, there's a deep and complex resonance to the name and figure of Clark Kerr, president of the University of California during an era of growth and turmoil. He was avuncular and benign, and yet somehow compromised. To adapt the provocative metaphor of Free Speech Movement leader Mario Savio, he was the man who oiled the machine that produced not only scholars but also bombs.
OPINION
December 9, 2003
Your coverage of Clark Kerr's legacy as chancellor of UC Berkeley and president of the University of California system offered an important history lesson for citizens (obituary, Dec. 2). The Master Plan for Higher Education (1960) is truly the jewel in the crown of California. As a community college professor of history who for 33 years has been sending his best transfer students to the UC schools, I can attest to the affordable, world-class education that our many disadvantaged students have received.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 14, 1994
George S. Mitrovich ("California's 'Secret' Elite Has Got to Go," Commentary, April 19) substituted frustration for facts. Thirteen of the 15 sitting appointed regents are Republicans, two are Democrats; at least five of the seven ex-officio regents are Democrats, including the student regent, both alumni regents, the lieutenant governor of California and the Speaker of the Assembly. While most regents would agree that 12 years is too long a term, during what Mitrovich calls the "zenith" period of the University of California, appointed regents served 16-year terms.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 19, 1985 | LEONARD BERNSTEIN, Times Staff Writer
The University of California at San Diego celebrated its 25th anniversary Monday with a day of pomp, partying and predictions of future success from the men who created the school and those who will lead it during the early years of its next quarter-century. "Twenty-five years ago, few would have dared predict the leap into the top ranks of American universities that UC San Diego managed so quickly and so well," University of California President David P.
OPINION
December 9, 2003
Your coverage of Clark Kerr's legacy as chancellor of UC Berkeley and president of the University of California system offered an important history lesson for citizens (obituary, Dec. 2). The Master Plan for Higher Education (1960) is truly the jewel in the crown of California. As a community college professor of history who for 33 years has been sending his best transfer students to the UC schools, I can attest to the affordable, world-class education that our many disadvantaged students have received.
OPINION
December 4, 2003 | Seth Rosenfeld, Seth Rosenfeld is a San Francisco Chronicle reporter. His report in the Chronicle, based on documents released as the result of his 17-year fight under the Freedom of Information Act, is available at sfgate.com/campus.
As president of the University of California during much of the tumultuous 1960s, Clark Kerr was confronted by students who reviled him as a symbol of the establishment and conservatives who vilified him for not cracking down on demonstrators. But he never suspected that his worst enemy was the FBI. Kerr, who died Monday at 92, seemed an unlikely target for FBI dirty tricks. He was a soft-spoken economist, an advisor to both Democratic and Republican presidents and an avowed anti-communist.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 2, 2003 | From a Times Staff Writer
Clark Kerr, the elder statesman of higher education whose blueprint for ensuring access to college for all Californians became a model for the nation, died Monday afternoon, according to a statement released by UC Berkeley. He was 92. Kerr, who served as UC Berkeley's first chancellor and then as the 12th president of the entire UC system, died in his sleep at his home in El Cerrito, Calif., after complications from a fall, campus officials said.
BOOKS
March 16, 2003 | Jonathan Kirsch, Jonathan Kirsch, a contributing writer to Book Review, is a 1971 graduate of UC Santa Cruz.
For men and women of a certain age and experience, there's a deep and complex resonance to the name and figure of Clark Kerr, president of the University of California during an era of growth and turmoil. He was avuncular and benign, and yet somehow compromised. To adapt the provocative metaphor of Free Speech Movement leader Mario Savio, he was the man who oiled the machine that produced not only scholars but also bombs.
BOOKS
October 21, 2001 | I. MICHAEL HEYMAN, I. Michael Heyman is chancellor emeritus of UC Berkeley (1980-1990) and secretary emeritus of the Smithsonian Institution (1994-2000). He teaches at UC Berkeley's Boalt Hall School of Law
Clark Kerr was an uncommonly important leader in institutions of higher education from 1952 to 1979 and continues as one of their most astute observers and commentators. At 90, he has written a memoir in two parts covering his years as UC Berkeley chancellor and University of California president that constitutes a major contribution to our understanding of American research universities. The first volume is "Academic Triumphs." The second part, "Political Turmoil," will be published next year.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 3, 1997
With reference to "An Educator's Legacy" (Education, Sept. 24), I was reminded of the dismay and disgust that I felt when Clark Kerr was dismissed as president of UC. Although I had voted for Ronald Reagan in 1966, I never voted for him again as governor or president. FRANCES H. HANDSAKER Redondo Beach
NEWS
June 11, 2013 | By Peter Taylor
In arguing that the individual campuses of the University of California would be better served by having a looser relationship with a drastically downsized UC office of the president, UCLA history professor David Myers relies in part on the late Clark Kerr to make his case. In a May 31 Times Op-Ed article , Myers cites the former UC president's observation that the "university-wide system has no alumni, no students, no faculty, no sports teams, no one to cheer for it. " Myers' selective quotation doesn't actually reflect Kerr's broader view on this subject.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 2, 2003 | From a Times Staff Writer
Clark Kerr, the elder statesman of higher education whose blueprint for ensuring access to college for all Californians became a model for the nation, died Monday afternoon, according to a statement released by UC Berkeley. He was 92. Kerr, who served as UC Berkeley's first chancellor and then as the 12th president of the entire UC system, died in his sleep at his home in El Cerrito, Calif., after complications from a fall, campus officials said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 24, 1997
It has been 30 years since Clark Kerr, the 12th president of the University of California, was abruptly fired by the UC Board of Regents, who disagreed with how he had handled student protests on campus. "I left the presidency just as I entered it: Fired with enthusiasm," he quipped at the time. Today, Kerr, 86, is widely regarded as higher education's preeminent elder statesman, and he remains as enthusiastic as ever.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 14, 1994
George S. Mitrovich ("California's 'Secret' Elite Has Got to Go," Commentary, April 19) substituted frustration for facts. Thirteen of the 15 sitting appointed regents are Republicans, two are Democrats; at least five of the seven ex-officio regents are Democrats, including the student regent, both alumni regents, the lieutenant governor of California and the Speaker of the Assembly. While most regents would agree that 12 years is too long a term, during what Mitrovich calls the "zenith" period of the University of California, appointed regents served 16-year terms.
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