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OPINION
May 10, 2011 | By Erwin Chemerinsky
The Supreme Court's recent 5-4 decision preventing consumers from bringing class-action suits against corporations is part of a disturbing trend of the five most conservative justices closing the courthouse doors to injured individuals. This is nothing other than a conservative majority favoring the interests of businesses over consumers, employees and others suffering injuries. The case involved Vincent and Liza Concepcion, who purchased a cellphone from AT&T Mobility. The form contract they signed provided for arbitration of all disputes between the parties.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 14, 2014 | By Abby Sewell
A patient whose personal information was stolen in a break-in at a medical billing contractor's office in Torrance has filed a class-action lawsuit against the company and Los Angeles County. Two Los Angeles law firms filed a complaint Friday in Superior Court. The suit was initially filed on behalf of a single patient whose name was not disclosed, but seeks class-action status. An office of Sutherland Healthcare Solutions, which handles billing and collections for the county's Department of Health Services and Department of Public Health, was burglarized Feb. 5 and computers were stolen.
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BUSINESS
November 14, 2012 | By Tiffany Hsu
Papa John's Pizza is facing a $250-million lawsuit from customers who claim that the fast-food chain illegally sent them 500,000 promotional text messages in 2010. The lawsuit was granted class-action status by a U.S. District Court judge in Seattle late last week, according to a statement from the Heyrich Kalish McGuigan law firm. Participants are seeking $500 for each unwanted text, which they say Papa John's sent without their permission. The complaint alleges that some of the chain's franchisees used the marketing company OnTime4U to send a flood of messages about pizza deals to a database of customers who had previously ordered from Papa John's.
OPINION
March 7, 2014 | By The Times editorial board
For more than a quarter of a century, investors have been able to bring class-action lawsuits against companies that have fraudulently inflated their stock prices without having to prove that each buyer of the stock had been individually duped. Now, industrial giant Halliburton Co. is trying to persuade the Supreme Court to make such lawsuits significantly harder, if not impossible, to bring. That would be a fantastic result for publicly traded companies, but a terrible one for the average investor.
BUSINESS
February 16, 2009 | Associated Press
A federal appeals court has granted Wal-Mart Stores Inc. a new hearing to decide whether plaintiffs grouped in a nationwide class-action case will instead be required to file separate lawsuits. A majority of judges on the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals said the issue should be heard by an 11-judge panel, but a hearing date has not yet been determined. Six female employees sued the Bentonville, Ark.-based company in 2001, saying they were paid less than men and promoted less frequently.
BUSINESS
January 27, 2010 | By E. Scott Reckard
Agreeing to settle 29 class-action lawsuits alleging predatory lending, the Ameriquest group of subprime lenders has pledged $22 million to repay aggrieved borrowers and their lawyers -- a fraction of its payments in previous suits before it shut down as the mortgage meltdown set in. The agreement potentially affects 712,000 borrowers from what once was the nation's largest subprime lender, based in Orange County. Many of the loans were from Argent Mortgage Co., an arm that funded borrowers through mortgage brokers.
NATIONAL
June 21, 2011 | By David G. Savage, Washington Bureau
Women and minorities who think they are underpaid will find it nearly impossible to band together to sue employers for discrimination under a Supreme Court ruling against 1.5 million female Wal-Mart employees in the most important job-bias case in a decade. Only if there is proof a company has a policy of paying less to women or minorities can the employees get together in a class-action suit, the court said in an opinion Monday by Justice Antonin Scalia. Statistics showing that a company's female workers earn far less and get fewer promotions than men will not suffice, the court said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 19, 2009 | Maura Dolan
The California Supreme Court revived a major class action lawsuit against the tobacco industry Monday, ruling that smokers could hold it accountable for alleged deceptive advertising. After years of consumer cases meeting their demise in lower courts, the state high court's 4-3 decision helped resuscitate a key consumer law that voters sharply limited in 2004 in the wake of lawsuit scandals. Justice Carlos R.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 24, 2009 | Alan Zarembo
Legal action is already underway for the 206 patients who received overdoses of radiation from CT brain scans at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center. But a class-action lawsuit filed this week on behalf of the victims has little chance of succeeding, several experts said. "This is the kind of case that the medical liability system doesn't help us with," said Tom Baker, a professor at the University of Pennsylvania Law School. The problem is that the damage from the scans is uncertain.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 22, 2012 | By Sam Quinones, Los Angeles Times
Four carwash workers filed suit Monday claiming that a family of carwash owners routinely withheld pay for overtime and denied them breaks during the summer. The lawsuit is one of a series filed on behalf of carwash workers since 2008 in an attempt by unions and immigrant advocates to improve conditions in an industry in which competition is fierce, profit margins are low and workers are often undocumented immigrants from Mexico and Central America. A Times report on the industry found it rife with nonpayment of overtime, false pay records and other abuses.
BUSINESS
March 5, 2014 | By David G. Savage
WASHINGTON - Halliburton Co. and other U.S. corporations urged the Supreme Court to reverse a 26-year-old ruling that triggered an avalanche of class-action lawsuits by investors in publicly traded companies. But based on justices' comments Wednesday, it appeared they would fall at least one vote short of a major victory. Chief Justice John G. Roberts Jr. and Justice Anthony M. Kennedy explored the idea of a "midway" ruling that would make it slightly harder, but not impossible, to bring such suits.
BUSINESS
December 26, 2013 | David Lazarus
Federal regulators are taking a closer look at those restrictive contract provisions that force consumers to arbitrate disputes - barring them from suing a company individually or joining a class-action lawsuit. And it doesn't look as if officials are buying into the business world's claim that such provisions are in consumers' best interest. "If you were to look in your wallet right now, the chances are high that one or more of your credit cards, debit cards or prepaid cards would be subject to a pre-dispute arbitration clause," Richard Cordray, director of the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, said during a recent appearance in Dallas.
SPORTS
November 25, 2013 | By Helene Elliott
VANCOUVER, Canada - Ten former NHL players have claimed in a class-action lawsuit the league was negligent in withholding and misrepresenting information about the consequences of repeated blows to the head, contributing to players' brain injuries and neurological disorders. The lawsuit, filed Monday in U.S. District Court for the District of Columbia, seeks compensatory and punitive damages in addition to a court-supervised, league-funded medical monitoring program to diagnose and treat head injuries.
NATIONAL
October 7, 2013 | By David G. Savage
WASHINGTON - The Supreme Court opened its new term Monday by hearing arguments on who can be sued for a massive Ponzi scheme and by saying "no" to more than 1,900 litigants who had hoped the justices would hear their appeals. The court ignored the partial government shutdown and said it would continue with "normal operations," at least this week. Because the Constitution forbids reducing pay for federal judges while they hold office, the justices will continue to receive their salaries.
BUSINESS
August 2, 2013 | Bloomberg News
Female Wal-Mart workers in California suing for gender discrimination can't pursue their claims against the retailer as a group because the evidence didn't show they had enough in common, a judge said. U.S. District Judge Charles Breyer in San Francisco said the women's request for class certification suffered from the same deficiencies as an earlier version of the case brought on behalf of a national group of more than 1 million women. That case was thrown out by the U.S. Supreme Court in 2011.
NEWS
June 20, 2013 | By David G. Savage
WASHINGTON -- The Supreme Court blocked restaurant owners from suing American Express over high fees Thursday, the latest in a series of 5-4 rulings have barred class-action claims against big corporations. The majority agreed individual restaurant owners could not afford the nearly $1 million cost of bringing an antitrust claim against Amex. But they ruled that an arbitration clause prevents the restaurant owners from joining together to sue. “The antitrust laws do not guarantee an affordable path to the vindication of every claim,” said Justice Antonin Scalia.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 27, 2010 | By Victoria Kim
The online dating site EHarmony.com has reached a settlement in a class-action lawsuit brought by gays and lesbians who said the service discriminated against them. As part of the proposed agreement, the company will pay more than half a million dollars and make its website more "welcoming" to seekers of same-sex matches, according to court documents filed Tuesday. The Pasadena-based company had already launched a service last year for gays and lesbians, called Compatible Partners, as part of an unrelated settlement with the New Jersey attorney general's civil rights division.
OPINION
April 9, 2003
Some lawyers representing consumers and injured workers in large class actions have taken advantage of their clients. No big shock there. They have paid themselves multimillion-dollar fees and, in doling out settlement funds, overcompensated workers with minimal injuries, often at the expense of those more severely injured. However nasty these excesses, they do not mean that class-action lawsuits should be severely limited, as proposed by Sens. Charles Grassley (R-Iowa) and Herb Kohl (D-Wis.).
SPORTS
June 20, 2013 | By David Wharton
For the last few years, the powers that be in college sports have watched nervously as an antitrust lawsuit wends its way through federal court. O'Bannon vs. NCAA is challenging traditional notions of amateurism, arguing that young athletes should receive more than just scholarships for their role in what has become a multibillion-dollar enterprise. On Thursday, the case arrives at a crucial fork in the road. A Northern California judge must decide if thousands of current and former college players can join as plaintiffs in what would become a class-action suit.
Los Angeles Times Articles
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