Advertisement
 
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsClass Action
IN THE NEWS

Class Action

BUSINESS
December 9, 2008 | Times Wire Services
DuPont Co., the third-largest U.S. chemical maker, won a judge's order denying class-action status to 23 lawsuits filed by consumers who said the company failed to warn them that heated Teflon may be dangerous. The cases must be tried separately because of the difficulty in determining which plaintiffs actually own non-stick cookware containing DuPont Teflon, U.S. District Judge Ronald E. Longstaff in Des Moines ruled Friday. DuPont allegedly failed to warn buyers that Teflon pots and pans, when heated, can emit toxic substances that are "likely to be carcinogenic," according to a master complaint filed in 2006.
Advertisement
BUSINESS
May 17, 2000 | Myron Levin
The tobacco industry won a legal victory in Maryland as the state's highest court tossed out a class action against cigarette makers. Ruling in a case known as Richardson vs. Philip Morris, et al., the Maryland Court of Appeals said a lower court had erred in allowing a single trial for all Maryland smokers suffering tobacco-related illnesses or addiction to nicotine.
BUSINESS
December 3, 1997 | Reuters
A Louisiana state judge ruled that a lawsuit against Dow Chemical Co. for its alleged part in the development of silicone breast implants could not be a class action. State District Judge Yada Magee said in New Orleans that there were too many individual issues in the cases to qualify as a class. She said the eight women who were class representatives could continue their legal action against the Midland, Mich.-based chemical giant.
BUSINESS
September 16, 2004 | From Dow Jones/Associated Press
A Missouri judge will allow a case over Marlboro Lights against Altria Group Inc.'s Philip Morris USA to proceed as a class action, but has placed limitations on those who can participate in the case. Circuit Court Judge Michael David in St. Louis limited those eligible to join to Missouri residents who purchased and smoked Marlboro Lights cigarettes from Nov. 9, 1995, five years before the original filing of the suit, through Dec. 31, 2003.
BUSINESS
June 12, 2003 | From Bloomberg News
Chrysler Corp.'s former U.S. shareholders will be allowed to sue DaimlerChrysler as a group, making it easier for the investors to pursue claims of fraud against the automaker, a judge ruled. All U.S. shareholders who exchanged their Chrysler shares for stock of the merged DaimlerChrysler company will be part of a certified class action, said Joseph J. Farnan Jr., a U.S. District Court judge in Wilmington, Del. Trial is set for Dec. 1.
BUSINESS
October 18, 1994
Abbey Healthcare Group Inc. in Costa Mesa said Monday that a federal class action complaint had against the corporation, Chairman Timothy M. Aitken, former Abbey executive Victor M.G. Chaltiel, 10 other individuals and several investment companies, including Prudential Ventures Partners II, Sequoia Capital IV and the Sequoia Capital Growth Fund. The complaint, filed in U.S.
BUSINESS
December 3, 1999 | Bloomberg News
A federal judge denied a doctor's request to grant class-action status to his false-advertising lawsuit against Aetna Inc. and United HealthCare Corp. U.S. District Judge David Hittner rejected Dr. Kenneth Ford's request to allow him to bring his lawsuit on behalf of specialist doctors who have contracted with Aetna and United HealthCare, the nation's two largest health insurers.
BUSINESS
April 1, 2006 | From the Associated Press
Merck & Co. suffered a significant legal setback Friday when an appeals court allowed health insurers and others to sue to recover the billions of dollars they spent on the Vioxx pain reliever. Merck attorney Ted Mayer called the ruling "deeply flawed" and said the company would appeal the decision by three New Jersey appellate judges to the state Supreme Court.
BUSINESS
October 25, 2003 | From Bloomberg News
Citigroup Inc. and its former telecommunications stock analyst Jack Grubman must defend class-action claims that they helped defraud WorldCom Inc. investors of $11 billion, a federal judge ruled Friday. U.S. District Judge Denise Cote ruled that shareholders and bondholders could proceed as a group in fraud suits against former officers, directors and underwriters of the long-distance telephone company. The ruling gives investors greater leverage in the litigation.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|