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Class Warfare

BUSINESS
January 21, 2014 | By Michael Hiltzik
Whether it's because President Obama recently highlighted the issue or because most Americans are really feeling the pain, the debate over income inequality is now part of the mainstream kitchen-table debate. That's the conclusion to be drawn from a Gallup poll released Monday, on Martin Luther King Day. The survey finds that two-thirds of adults are somewhat or very dissatisfied with income and wealth distribution in the U.S. The poll was taken on Jan. 5-8, or about a month after the president's speech about economic inequality .  The partisan breakdown is about what you'd expect.
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OPINION
March 12, 2013
Re "Banks may be too big to prosecute, U.S. says," March 8 If banks are too big to prosecute, it is time to break them up. Too big to prosecute is too big to exist. Larry Severson Fountain Valley ALSO: Letters: Two sides on Hugo Chavez Letters: Mental health and marijuana Letters: 'Class warfare' on the L.A. ballot
NEWS
January 11, 2012 | By James Oliphant
Mitt Romney, to little surprise, won the New Hampshire primary. But what bodes well for the GOP presidential front-runner is how he did it. The candidate appeared to transcend what he termed "the bitter politics of envy" by demonstrating an exceptionally strong and wide base of support, according to exit poll data supplied by CNN. He received more votes than any other candidate from those who identified themselves as very conservative, from...
BOOKS
October 12, 1997 | GEOFFREY COWAN, Geoffrey Cowan, former director of the Voice of America and author of "The People v. Clarence Darrow," is dean of the USC Annenberg School for Communications
On a snowy evening in late December 1905, as former Idaho Gov. Frank Steunenberg opened the wooden gate to his comfortable lamp-lit home, an explosion shattered the air, demolishing the gate, splintering yards of boardwalk and tearing the governor's body apart. The blast could be heard for miles around, and the reverberations shook the nation.
OPINION
December 2, 2002
Robert Reich's "A Winning $700-Billion Balancing Act" made for chilling reading. It was the epitome of naked class warfare. Karl Marx would have been very proud. Reich makes the taking of much of what's left of one's lifetime efforts to distribute to others sound almost sensible. "From each according to his abilities; to each according to his needs." Sound familiar? Fortunately, we still live in a capitalist society, where we can work hard all our lives with some assurance that our children will inherit the fruits of our labors.
OPINION
October 1, 2004 | JONATHAN CHAIT
Republicans have insisted for years that the American people don't resent the rich, they admire them. Strangely, though, they have devoted enormous energy this year to informing the American people that John F. Kerry is rich. The Republican National Committee produced a game called Kerryopoly, in which a player earning $40,000 a year "can land on properties like Nantucket, worth $9.18 million, Beacon Hill, worth $6.9 million, or Idaho, worth $4.9 million."
OPINION
September 24, 2000 | Nicolaus Mills, Nicolaus Mills is a professor of American studies at Sarah Lawrence College and the author of "The Triumph of Meanness: America's War Against Its Better Self."
With just over a week to go before the presidential debates begin, the unexpected has happened. The differences between Vice President Al Gore and Texas Gov. George W. Bush haven't narrowed, they've grown wider. At issue is the future of egalitarianism in America. Can Gore convince voters that his defense of "working families"--or, as he now prefers to call them, "hard-working, middle-class families"--constitutes a new egalitarianism?
BUSINESS
February 27, 2014 | By Jessica Guynn
SAN FRANCISCO -- Has class warfare come to the exclusive Silicon Valley enclave of Atherton? In the Lindenwood neighborhood, where average home prices exceed $7 million, vandals last week spray-painted black graffiti targeting the “1%” on walls, garage doors, a gate, a car, even white picket fences. "Most people think this is a one-time thing, but I wouldn't be surprised if security-camera companies are doing a lot of business right now," Vice Mayor Rick DeGolia told the San Francisco Chronicle . "I think everyone's hoping this doesn't happen again.
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