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SPORTS
August 28, 2013 | Chris Erskine
Baby Einstein? Meet Baby Ronaldo. An L.A. soccer academy is targeting toddlers as young as 18 months, with a half-dozen students taking part in weekly classes to foster social and soccer skills at the earliest possible moment. Note that some of the young strikers can't speak yet and diapers are an issue. As they say, you've got to walk before you can run. These days, guess you have to dribble before you can run as well. But, hey, don't be so judgmental. Yet. Because in the world of youth sports, just when you think you've seen it all, you haven't really seen it all. The toddler soccer classes were created by Stewart Cunningham, a former English youth star with a love of soccer and the realization that, for most young soccer players, too early may not be early enough.
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NATIONAL
September 14, 2012 | By Molly Hennessy-Fiske and Michael Muskal, This post has been updated, as indicated below.
All buildings at the University of Texas at Austin were reopened Friday afternoon after a bomb threat earlier prompted a campus-wide evacuation, officials said. The university grounds were cleared for reentry at noon, a campus police dispatcher told the Los Angeles Times. "We are very confident the campus is safe," said university President William Powers Jr. at a broadcast news briefing. He said university officials had worked with local, state and federal officials to assess the situation.
NATIONAL
May 8, 2010 | By Paloma Esquivel and Nicole Santa Cruz, Los Angeles Times
At the main entrance to a campus in Tucson, a sign greets visitors with "Welcome to Tucson High, Home of the Largest Xicano Studies Program in the Nation." "Xicano," or Chicano, studies is a 14-year-old program in the Tucson Unified School District that offers classes from elementary through high school in topics such as literature, history and social justice that emphasize Latino authors and history. In the wake of Arizona's adoption of a law to crack down on illegal immigration, such classes are the subject of another ethnically tinged fight in the state.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 10, 2013 | By Carla Rivera
California community colleges will now be able to charge more for high-demand classes during summer and winter terms under legislation signed by Gov. Jerry Brown on Thursday. The new law creates a voluntary pilot program that allows some colleges to charge non-resident tuition -- up to $200 per unit - -for hard-to-obtain classes such as college algebra, history and English that students need to graduate and transfer. The plan is controversial and was opposed by students, faculty and community colleges Chancellor Brice Harris, who argued that it would create something like a fast-track pass for students who can pay. It is similar in many respects to the two-tier plan attempted by Santa Monica College last year to offer high-priced classes during a summer extension program alongside state-funded courses, which are set by the Legislature at $46 per unit.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 19, 1997
The Community Services Department is offering a four-week series of Jazzercise classes starting this month. The jazz-dance exercise course is based on simple movements to a variety of music styles. Classes are open to anyone 16 and older and are at the Huntington Beach gym and pool facility, 1600 Palm Ave. Tuition is based on the number of classes a week. A $16 once-a-week course will be from 7:45 to 8:45 a.m. on consecutive Saturdays, March 1 to 22.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 27, 1988
As a teacher who did not participate in the reported "sickout" at Santa Ana High School on March 17 and who was on campus for the entire school day, I wish to inform parents of the students that the district statement that "no classes were canceled" is incorrect. In fact the entire third period was canceled, in effect canceling about 100 classes. The time normally scheduled for the third period was called "second period" by the administration, and this "second period" was followed by "fourth period."
REAL ESTATE
September 8, 1985
Beginning this month, contractor A. T. (Tom) Horsfall will teach "Innovations in Construction" classes aimed at people who plan to build a new house or remodel an existing one. Offered at Los Angeles City College and Cal State Los Angeles, the class is available in two parts, with the first a prerequisite for the second, Horsfall said. At City College, Part I will be offered beginning Tuesday through Nov. 12 from 7 to 10 p.m. at $200.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 21, 2013 | Steve Lopez
Liza Bercovici suspected something was up when a student at Gabriella Charter School approached her last week and said, "Happy birthday tomorrow, Miss Liza. " So it was not a surprise the next day when the school's 400-plus students sang "Happy Birthday" to her at morning assembly. Bercovici sighed in appreciation, and when urged to make a speech, she stood humbly before the small sea of students gathered on the playground of the Echo Park school she'd founded. "I think everybody here knows that this school was started out of my love for my daughter, whose name was Gabriella," Bercovici said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 14, 1992
There are two important considerations omitted from the story ("Classroom Space at a Premium," Times Valley Edition, June 30) concerning hordes of students unable to enroll in community college classes in the Valley because of overcrowding: 1. It is true that almost all of the general education courses in the community colleges fill early and are closed to latecomers. But of those students fortunate enough to enroll, the percentage who actually complete the classes is seldom more than 65%, and sometimes less than 50%. Most colleges try to compensate by overloading classes at the start of the semester.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 24, 2010 | By Maria L. La Ganga
Aaron Glimme's Advanced Placement chemistry students straggle in, sleepy. It is 7:30 a.m. at Berkeley High School. The day doesn't officially begin for another hour. They pull on safety goggles, measure out t-butyl alcohol and try to determine the molar mass of an unknown substance by measuring how much its freezing point decreases. In the last school year, 82% of Berkeley's AP chemistry students passed the rigorous exam, which gives college credit for high school work. The national passing rate is 55.2%.
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