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April 26, 2000 | PHILIP KENNICOTT, WASHINGTON POST
BMG Classics, once a powerhouse of the classical music recording industry, is being gutted in a major reorganization of the recording labels owned by the German entertainment giant Bertelsmann. In its heyday a decade ago, BMG Classics--better known in America under its imprints RCA Victor Red Seal and RCA Victor--released several hundred recordings a year, featuring major box-office artists like flutist James Galway and pianist Evgeny Kissin.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 22, 2014 | By James C. Taylor
NEW YORK - Pianist Evgeny Kissin speaks many languages, but to audiences around the world he is best known - and in some circles, revered - for his ability to articulate, with precision, the greatest scores of the classical piano repertoire. Talking with the Russian-born artist on New York's Upper West Side a few days before a sold-out solo recital at Carnegie Hall (the program of Scriabin and Schubert will repeat at Disney Hall on Monday), it becomes immediately clear that Kissin's mind is hard-wired for accuracy.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 28, 2013
The guitarist Rez Abbasi embodies the globally omnivorous state of modern jazz. Born in Pakistan, schooled in L.A. and now a New Yorker, he's interested in reinventing a huge swath of American jazz and South Asian classic music. In his hands, the globe's music feels relentlessly new and progressive. The Blue Whale, 123 Astronaut Onizuka St. Suite 301, L.A. 9 p.m. Sat. bluewhalemusic.com .
ENTERTAINMENT
March 14, 2014 | By Mark Swed, Los Angeles Times Music Critic
MARCH 24 Evgeny Kissin Every recital by this introverted Russian pianist with a godlike touch and the ability to breathe fire onto the keyboard is eagerly anticipated. But his first appearance in Walt Disney Concert Hall was more so than most. On Oct. 28, 2003, Kissin, then 32, had the honor of giving the first solo recital in the new hall, which was five days old. Kissin was back five years later, and it will have been another five for his third Disney recital. Much has changed.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 19, 2012 | By Susan King, Los Angeles Times
Though Carl Davis has composed scores for such films as 1981's "The French Lieutenant's Woman," over the past three decades, he's become one of silent cinema's greatest champions, composing and conducting scores for countless silent films as well as orchestrating existing scores for such silents as Charlie Chaplin's 1931 masterwork"City Lights. " In March, the U.S.-born, London-based composer earned kudos for conducting the 46-piece Oakland East Bay Symphony in his score for the restored 5 1/2-hour version of Abel Gance's 1927 epic "Napoleon.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 11, 2012 | By Kirk Silsbee, Special to the Los Angeles Times
No one's ever called music impresario April Williams lazy. She began booking and producing music in the upstairs room at Vitello's restaurant in Studio City at the end of 2009. It's now one of the most coveted jazz spots - for musicians and listeners alike - in Southern California. On April 18, she breaks new ground with a spring music series at the Federal, in the heart of the NoHo Arts District near a Metro Rail station. She could hardly inaugurate her new enterprise more auspiciously: Williams has tapped Bob Sheppard, one of the preeminent West Coast jazz saxophonist stylists and busiest recording session players in the Hollywood studios.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 25, 1996 | CHRIS PASLES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The top music and dance events in 1996: 1. "Voices of Light: The Passion of Joan of Arc," score by Richard Einhorn; 1928 silent film by Carl Dreyer; Los Angeles Mozart Orchestra, I Cantori and vocal soloists led by Lucinda Carver, Orange County Performing Arts Center, Costa Mesa (Oct. 10-11). Silent films, of course, were never silent; live music always accompanied them. Recently, some composers have been writing scores for classics such as Dreyer's overwhelming "The Passion of Joan of Arc."
ENTERTAINMENT
March 4, 1996 | CHRIS PASLES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Armies are notorious for launching a lot of things, but string quartets usually aren't among them. Nevertheless, that is how the Daniel String Quartet got its start. "When you are 18, in Israel, you have to go to the army for three years," cellist Zvi Maschkovski said in a recent phone interview from New York, where the group was making the first stop of a tour that brings the quartet to the Irvine Barclay Theatre tonight.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 8, 1996 | SHAUNA SNOW, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Orchestra to Resume: The financially strapped San Diego Symphony Orchestra, which suspended its season Jan. 13, has received enough money from two major donors to resume performances while fund-raising continues, board president Elsie Weston announced Tuesday. Pending approval of the musicians, who must agree not to seek back wages, the season would begin again on Feb. 23 and continue through March.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 1, 2014 | By Barbara Isenberg
Channeling Danny Kaye, Victor Borge, P.D.Q. Bach and other musicians-cum-comics, conservatory-trained violinist Aleksey Igudesman and pianist Hyung-ki Joo like to say that they don't make fun of classical music but rather that they have fun with classical music. After entertaining packed houses around the world, the 40-year-old YouTube celebrities return to Long Beach's Carpenter Performing Arts Center on Jan. 5. But first comes a phone call from Joo at their home base of Vienna, with Igudesman reporting in from the Dominican Republic.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 27, 2013 | By Mark Swed, Los Angeles Times Music Critic
The Times asked its reporters and critics to highlight figures in entertainment and the arts who will be making news in 2014. Here's who they picked: Khatia Buniatishvili | Pianist The sultry young Georgian pianist Khatia Buniatishvili sneaked into Los Angeles under the radar last February for an underpublicized recital debut at Cal State L.A.'s Luckman Theatre. But her Los Angeles Philharmonic debut in January will not be so stealthy. Buniatishvili will be playing Chopin's Second Piano Concerto with another young Eastern European - Polish conductor and Indianapolis Symphony Music Director Krzysztof Urbanski, who made an impressive Hollywood Bowl debut last year.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 27, 2013 | By David Ng
Countertenors are a decidedly acquired taste - men who are trained to sing in the manner of women, or more accurately, in the style of the castrati, those singers hundreds of years ago who were castrated at a young age to preserve their boyish voices. In this rarefied (even for opera) domain, French singer Philippe Jaroussky stands as the hottest young thing. Charismatic, dashing and still youthful at 35, he has entranced European audiences with his otherworldly pitch and vocal dexterity, while also amassing a sizable online following.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 18, 2013 | By Deborah Vankin
Chinese pianist Yuja Wang is widely admired for her astonishing technical skills at the keyboard and a charismatic stage presence. The 26-year-old also draws attention for her fashion statements and sometimes daring style choices on the concert stage. Her newest album, released in October, is a live concert recorded last spring of the challenging Rachmaninov's Third Piano Concerto and Prokofiev's Second Piano Concerto. Wang played them in Caracas with Gustavo Dudamel conducting the Simón Bolívar Symphony Orchestra of Venezuela.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 21, 2013 | By Mark Swed, Los Angeles Times Music Critic
For most people, the image of John F. Kennedy's assassination is documentary. And we all know what that means. Where do you stand on the Zapruder film? Was this the act of a single gunman or a conspiracy? With the 50 th anniversary Friday of one of the saddest days in America, the documentary evidence can be endlessly debated, as can the Kennedy administration's successes and failures, the president's complicated personality and his legacy. In November 1963, classical music was called on to help the nation deal with the emotional fallout in a more elemental way. It often is when tragedy leaves us without the words we need.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 27, 2013 | By Reed Johnson, Los Angeles Times
Thirteen months ago, on a calm, cool midnight in Santa Monica, Patrick Scott slipped out of the tiny Miles Memorial Playhouse and flopped on the stairs like a runner midway through a marathon. A few hours earlier, the first of 32 piano soloists had launched into a 24-hour, nonstop rendition of Erik Satie's "Vexations," which requires repeating one page of mystical, proto-Minimalist music 840 times. It was the kind of evening that Scott and his partner, Mark Alan Hilt, live for. As co-founders of Jacaranda, a decade-old classical music series based at Santa Monica's First Presbyterian Church, the men believe that when it comes to serving the interests of idiosyncratic, exceptionally demanding music, more is always more.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 9, 2013 | By Kenneth Turan
Two very different, equally appealing recommendations this week, starting with the continuing Caméras d'Afrique series at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art's Bing Auditorium, a rare (for this city) look at the compelling cinema of West Africa. A chance to view classics is a special highlight here. On Tuesday at 8:15 p.m., enjoy Souleyamane Cissé's 1987 "Yeelen" (Brightness). On Thursday, there is a double bill of 1963's seminal short "Borom Sarret" by Ousmane Sembène, the father of African filmmaking, and 1982's "Finyé" (The Wind)
ENTERTAINMENT
October 9, 2013 | By Mark Swed, Los Angeles Times Music Critic
It was said to have been a disastrous seven days for classical music in America. "Hell week" is what Russell Platt called it in the New Yorker last week. New York City Opera declared bankruptcy and shut down. Minnesota Orchestra's music director Osmo Vänskä resigned in frustration over a contract dispute that forced management to cancel all of last season and, still unresolved, resulted in the cancellation of a high-profile tour to Carnegie Hall next month. Speaking of Carnegie, the country's most famous hall canceled its opening night gala last week because of a strike by the stagehands.
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