Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsClassical Review
IN THE NEWS

Classical Review

FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
October 5, 1994 | SUSAN BLISS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
John Cale brought an amalgam of rock, musical theater and classical methods to the Coach House on Monday night. A classically trained composer and one-time member of minimalist La Monte Young's Theater of Eternal Music, he perhaps is best known as co-founder of the Velvet Underground, the rock band that traveled with Andy Warhol as part of his mid-'60s mixed-media show, the Exploding Plastic Inevitable. However, before a moderate audience here, he brought only glimmers of an experimental bent.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
January 7, 2013 | By Mark Swed, Los Angeles Times Music Critic
It's a new year, and the Los Angeles Philharmonic celebrated with a new concerto, or at least a nearly new one. Tan Dun's "The Tears of Nature," which features a whiz-bang percussionist and orchestra, is an L.A. Phil co-commission involving four orchestras. A radio orchestra in Lübeck, Germany, gave the world premiere last month. But though the concerto's U.S. premiere Friday night at Walt Disney Concert Hall by percussionist Martin Grubinger and guest conductor Christoph Eschenbach was but a deuxième , the L.A. Phil's very first notes of 2013 were still fresh and wondrous.
Advertisement
ENTERTAINMENT
November 14, 2010
'Lohengrin' Where: L.A. Opera, Dorothy Chandler Pavilion, downtown L.A. When: 6:30 p.m. Saturday, Dec. 1, 4 and 9; 2 p.m. Nov. 28 and Dec. 12 Tickets: $20 to $270 Information: (213) 972-8001 or http://www.laopera.com Running time: 4 hours, 10 minutes
ENTERTAINMENT
April 15, 2012
'La Bohème' Where: Pacific Symphony, Renée and Henry Segerstrom Concert Hall, Costa Mesa When: 8 p.m. Thursday, Saturday and April 24. Tickets: $30-$110 Information: (714) 755-5799 or http://www.pacificsymphony.org Where: Los Angeles Opera, Dorothy Chandler Pavilion, downtown L.A. When: May 12-June 2 Tickets: $20-$230 Information: (213) 972-8001 or http://www.laopera.com
ENTERTAINMENT
October 26, 2011
Pasadena Symphony Who: Mei-Ann Chen, conductor and James Ehnes, violin Where: Ambassador Auditorium, 131 S. St. John Ave., Pasadena When: 2 and 8 p.m. Saturday Tickets: $35 to $100 Information: (626) 793-7172; PasadenaSymphony-Pops.org
ENTERTAINMENT
March 25, 2012
Baltimore Symphony Orchestra Where: Renée & Henry Segerstrom Concert Hall, Costa Mesa When: 8 p.m. Wednesday Tickets: $30 to $250 Information: (949) 553-2422 or http://www.philharmonicsociety.org
ENTERTAINMENT
April 15, 2012
'La Bohème' Where: Pacific Symphony, Renée and Henry Segerstrom Concert Hall, Costa Mesa When: 8 p.m. Thursday, Saturday and April 24. Tickets: $30-$110 Information: (714) 755-5799 or http://www.pacificsymphony.org Where: Los Angeles Opera, Dorothy Chandler Pavilion, downtown L.A. When: May 12-June 2 Tickets: $20-$230 Information: (213) 972-8001 or http://www.laopera.com
ENTERTAINMENT
November 5, 1988 | KENNETH HERMAN
Those who follow the musical peregrinations of the San Diego Symphony on a weekly basis must be sorely tempted to ask, "Will the real San Diego Symphony please stand!" Each week, a new guest conductor seems to conjure a different orchestra--each with its own strengths and weaknesses--out of the same musical ensemble.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 4, 1991 | KENNETH HERMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
In the best of all possible worlds, the string quartet is the crucible in which a composer's essential character is revealed. The Vermeer String Quartet brought white-hot passions to its Saturday night concert of Beethoven, Shostakovich and Dvorak, making Sherwood Auditorium the best of all possible musical worlds for an incredibly rich two hours. Passion, of course, was only part of the Vermeer success story.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 1, 1988 | KENNETH HERMAN
SummerFest '88, the La Jolla Chamber Music Society's conspicuously well-attended 11-day festival, took its final curtain calls Tuesday night at Sherwood Auditorium. Festival artistic director Heiichiro Ohyama took the podium and led the San Diego Chamber Orchestra in a pleasant potpourri of Mozart, J. S. Bach and Ernest Bloch. With only a tangential relationship to the chamber music festival, the program seemed like a postscript rather than a grand finale.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 25, 2012
Baltimore Symphony Orchestra Where: Renée & Henry Segerstrom Concert Hall, Costa Mesa When: 8 p.m. Wednesday Tickets: $30 to $250 Information: (949) 553-2422 or http://www.philharmonicsociety.org
ENTERTAINMENT
October 26, 2011
Pasadena Symphony Who: Mei-Ann Chen, conductor and James Ehnes, violin Where: Ambassador Auditorium, 131 S. St. John Ave., Pasadena When: 2 and 8 p.m. Saturday Tickets: $35 to $100 Information: (626) 793-7172; PasadenaSymphony-Pops.org
ENTERTAINMENT
November 14, 2010
'Lohengrin' Where: L.A. Opera, Dorothy Chandler Pavilion, downtown L.A. When: 6:30 p.m. Saturday, Dec. 1, 4 and 9; 2 p.m. Nov. 28 and Dec. 12 Tickets: $20 to $270 Information: (213) 972-8001 or http://www.laopera.com Running time: 4 hours, 10 minutes
ENTERTAINMENT
February 2, 2009 | Richard S. Ginell
What was it about the number 3 (perhaps the connection to Beethoven's "Eroica"?) that seems to have inspired certain mid-20th century American symphonists to reach for a little something extra? Aaron Copland's Third Symphony was grander and more portentous than his others. Roy Harris' great Third still anchors his name on the periphery of the repertoire. Leonard Bernstein's Third was his most audacious symphony and remains controversial. And there was William Schuman's Third -- a tremendously galvanizing score that has been all but bypassed by history.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 5, 1994 | SUSAN BLISS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
John Cale brought an amalgam of rock, musical theater and classical methods to the Coach House on Monday night. A classically trained composer and one-time member of minimalist La Monte Young's Theater of Eternal Music, he perhaps is best known as co-founder of the Velvet Underground, the rock band that traveled with Andy Warhol as part of his mid-'60s mixed-media show, the Exploding Plastic Inevitable. However, before a moderate audience here, he brought only glimmers of an experimental bent.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 27, 1993 | TIMOTHY MANGAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Samuel Wong? Daniel Gaisford? Who? At first blush, it appeared as if the powers-that-be at the Pacific Symphony were happy enough to let the fireworks and cannon and old Piotr Ilyich (Tchaikovsky, that is) do all the work of packing 'em into Irvine Meadows Amphitheatre on Saturday night, for the seventh annual Tchaikovsky Spectacular. Never underestimate bombs bursting in air: 11,139 officially tabulated listeners showed up for the festivities.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 19, 1990 | KENNETH HERMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Soprano Kathleen Battle had an uneven night at Civic Theatre Saturday. In the opening half of her recital, she started two songs over again, apparently fighting drainage or some other vocal discomfort. And, on several occasions, the diva was at odds with her overly independent accompanist, Kenneth Griffiths, whom she gave numerous corrections with unsubtle hand signals.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 7, 1992 | KENNETH HERMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
After the emotional frenzy of a national election, Thursday night's understated San Diego Symphony concert was just what the doctor ordered. In his first appearance with the local orchestra, guest conductor James Loughran assembled three broadly paced Romantic scores that seemed to suspend time as they meandered over their highly individual musical landscapes.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 7, 1992 | KENNETH HERMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
After the emotional frenzy of a national election, Thursday night's understated San Diego Symphony concert was just what the doctor ordered. In his first appearance with the local orchestra, guest conductor James Loughran assembled three broadly paced Romantic scores that seemed to suspend time as they meandered over their highly individual musical landscapes.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 1, 1991 | KENNETH HERMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Scholars protested when the popular movie "Amadeus" portrayed their revered Mozart as an oversexed prankster. And Tom Hulce's cacophonous cackle drove them up the wall. But, even if the film exaggerated Mozart's penchant for humor and frivolity, there is ample evidence for his affinity to comedy.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|