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Classified Information

NEWS
April 27, 1998 | REBECCA TROUNSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Ehud Tenenbaum was arrested on suspicion of hacking his way into Pentagon and other sensitive computer systems, Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu was openly admiring of the young Israeli, lauding his skills as "damn good." Netanyahu added that the 18-year-old was "dangerous too." But the Israeli prime minister's praise made an instant celebrity of a young man suspected of leading the most serious attack on the Pentagon's computers and breaking into as many as 700 sites worldwide.
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 21, 1990 | ALLAN PARACHINI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Heavy cost overruns may have caused Occidental Petroleum officials last summer to use accounting devices to switch millions of dollars from the Armand Hammer Museum of Art and Cultural Center books to other corporate categories. In order to settle a shareholder suit over financing of the center, Occidental had earlier agreed to hold costs for the Westwood facility to $60 million or less. To meet the goal, the oil company had to reduce the price of the museum by $18.
NEWS
September 16, 2000 | From the Washington Post
John M. Deutch, who has admitted mishandling classified information while serving as director of the CIA, is now under investigation for similar security violations when he previously held high-level posts in the Defense Department, according to confidential documents and officials familiar with the case.
NEWS
July 12, 2013 | By David G. Savage
WASHINGTON - For the first time in more than 30 years, the Justice Department will revise its rules for investigations involving journalists to sharply limit the use of subpoenas or search warrants to obtain the phone records and e-mails of reporters. According to a Justice Department official, the new guidelines will say that in nearly all instances, news organizations will be notified in advance when federal agents are seeking their phone records as part of a broader investigation.
NATIONAL
September 23, 2006 | From Times Wire Reports
Vice President Dick Cheney's former chief of staff plans to take the stand at his January trial to tell jurors that he never lied to investigators in the CIA leak case, defense attorneys said. I. Lewis "Scooter" Libby is charged with perjury, obstruction and lying to the FBI about his conversations in 2003 with reporters regarding Valerie Plame's CIA job.
NEWS
April 9, 1997 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
President Clinton said he had no reason to believe that his aides improperly passed top-secret intelligence information to Democratic Party officials. The Washington Post reported that the White House supplied classified information to the Democratic National Committee in 1995 to prevent a Latvian businessman with alleged ties to organized crime from attending a fund-raising dinner with the president.
NEWS
October 19, 1991 | From Associated Press
The Iran-Contra criminal case against retired CIA official Clair E. George erupted Friday into a battle over access to some of the most closely held secrets at the CIA. George's lawyers demanded more than 750,000 pages of classified documents from the Iran-Contra prosecutions of former White House aide Oliver L. North and former CIA station chief Joseph Fernandez.
NEWS
May 16, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A federal judge ruled that the Constitution limits the government's power to require drug tests for job applicants if the job has nothing to do with police work, public safety or official secrets. The decision by U.S. District Judge Gerhard A. Gesell came in the case of Carl Willner, who filed suit after the Justice Department tentatively accepted him for employment in its Antitrust Division and then asked him to submit to a urine test.
NEWS
April 21, 1991 | From Associated Press
The government is abusing its power to screen books, articles, speeches and other forms of communication by its employees for classified information, a House committee chairman said Saturday. "It is quite unnecessary and inconsistent with constitutional principles to have government censors determining what acts of expression and creation by federal employees may be permitted," said Rep. John Conyers Jr. (D-Mich.).
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