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Classrooms Overcrowding

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 7, 1996 | LUCILLE RENWICK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
More than 500 parents filed into the auditorium at Van Nuys High School Tuesday evening to take part in a lottery to determine whether their children will be walking to school this fall or spending up to an hour a day riding a bus. The two-hour meeting was called by administrators at Van Nuys to head off the overcrowding problem the school will face this fall when it converts from a three-year to a four-year high school and receives more than 1,400 additional ninth- and 10th-graders.
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NEWS
October 22, 1999 | JOCELYN Y. STEWART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In 1987, the year Lindsay Cox turned 1, the Los Angeles school board voted to close Tweedy Elementary School in South Gate because of health concerns caused by nearby industrial sites. In its place, the district set up a makeshift school in a city park--a collection of bungalows on a fenced-off slab of asphalt. The plan was to build a replacement school and another high school. Twelve years later, Lindsay is a pretty, dark-haired 13-year-old, with a love of theater and ballet folklorico.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 5, 1996 | LUCILLE RENWICK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The first day of class at Van Nuys High School heaped more than its usual load of adolescent angst on hundreds of students. Instead of worrying about being in the same classes as their friends, many wondered whether they would even be at the same school.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 28, 1998 | ANN L. KIM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Educators are calling the federal government's seven-year plan to put 100,000 new teachers in the nation's classrooms a positive move, but not an automatic fix for public schools. As part of the omnibus budget bill approved by Congress last week, the class size reduction initiative would distribute $1.2 billion to local school districts next year for teacher hiring and training.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 7, 1996
It's 7:30 a.m. and Vicky Bayani is shuffling her way through a throng of parents at Jane Addams Elementary School in North Long Beach, where she drops off her third-grade son. She then walks to a nearby preschool and deposits her 4-year-old son at the 8 a.m class. At 10 a.m., she's back at Jane Addams--this time dropping off her third boy, a second-grader.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 31, 1996 | ALAN EYERLY
Reducing class sizes remains a goal of Anaheim City School District officials, but the challenge is finding enough classroom space. As Supt. Roberta Thompson put it, maintaining a ratio of 20 students per teacher in the first and second grades "is not only desirable, it's critical to improving instruction." But, she added, "we have less facilities than we have kids."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 6, 1996 | AMY PYLE, TIMES EDUCATION WRITER
Only one thing worked in Jana Doros' favor on the first day of school: The day was shorter than usual, with the dismissal bell ringing just after noon. But nothing else about Thursday's schedule at Reseda Elementary was accommodating, as Doros struggled to maintain her enthusiasm under less-than-ideal circumstances.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 12, 1998 | TINA NGUYEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Now, it's the freshmen's turn. After primary elementary grades gained a major windfall to slash class sizes to 20 students, the new state budget contains $78 million to do the same in some key ninth-grade classes. As it turns out, though, the ninth-grade money is tied to matching funds from districts in ways that actually make it hardest for the schools that need the relief most to get it.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 5, 1998 | Christine Baron, Christine Baron is a high school English teacher in Orange County. You can reach her at educ@latimes.com or (714) 966-4550
The teachers at my school had a chance to speak with some school board members recently. There were the usual questions about salary negotiations, building repairs and personnel decisions. Then the inevitable question arose about class size from a veteran teacher. Let me back up. In California, we've dealt with large classes for so long now, it's become a kind of sick joke. Faculty members discuss their numbers like soldiers swapping war stories.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 28, 1998 | ANN L. KIM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Educators are calling the federal government's seven-year plan to put 100,000 new teachers in the nation's classrooms a positive move, but not an automatic fix for public schools. As part of the omnibus budget bill approved by Congress last week, the class size reduction initiative would distribute $1.2 billion to local school districts next year for teacher hiring and training.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 12, 1998 | TINA NGUYEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Now, it's the freshmen's turn. After primary elementary grades gained a major windfall to slash class sizes to 20 students, the new state budget contains $78 million to do the same in some key ninth-grade classes. As it turns out, though, the ninth-grade money is tied to matching funds from districts in ways that actually make it hardest for the schools that need the relief most to get it.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 5, 1998 | Christine Baron, Christine Baron is a high school English teacher in Orange County. You can reach her at educ@latimes.com or (714) 966-4550
The teachers at my school had a chance to speak with some school board members recently. There were the usual questions about salary negotiations, building repairs and personnel decisions. Then the inevitable question arose about class size from a veteran teacher. Let me back up. In California, we've dealt with large classes for so long now, it's become a kind of sick joke. Faculty members discuss their numbers like soldiers swapping war stories.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 7, 1996
It's 7:30 a.m. and Vicky Bayani is shuffling her way through a throng of parents at Jane Addams Elementary School in North Long Beach, where she drops off her third-grade son. She then walks to a nearby preschool and deposits her 4-year-old son at the 8 a.m class. At 10 a.m., she's back at Jane Addams--this time dropping off her third boy, a second-grader.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 6, 1996 | AMY PYLE, TIMES EDUCATION WRITER
Only one thing worked in Jana Doros' favor on the first day of school: The day was shorter than usual, with the dismissal bell ringing just after noon. But nothing else about Thursday's schedule at Reseda Elementary was accommodating, as Doros struggled to maintain her enthusiasm under less-than-ideal circumstances.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 5, 1996 | LUCILLE RENWICK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The first day of class at Van Nuys High School heaped more than its usual load of adolescent angst on hundreds of students. Instead of worrying about being in the same classes as their friends, many wondered whether they would even be at the same school.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 7, 1996 | LUCILLE RENWICK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
More than 500 parents filed into the auditorium at Van Nuys High School Tuesday evening to take part in a lottery to determine whether their children will be walking to school this fall or spending up to an hour a day riding a bus. The two-hour meeting was called by administrators at Van Nuys to head off the overcrowding problem the school will face this fall when it converts from a three-year to a four-year high school and receives more than 1,400 additional ninth- and 10th-graders.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 3, 1989 | MARC LACEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Although a 15-year decline in enrollment in Manhattan Beach schools has finally leveled off and the district budget has moved from the red back into the black, four candidates vying for the school board in next week's election say the schools are at an important crossroads.
NEWS
October 22, 1999 | JOCELYN Y. STEWART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In 1987, the year Lindsay Cox turned 1, the Los Angeles school board voted to close Tweedy Elementary School in South Gate because of health concerns caused by nearby industrial sites. In its place, the district set up a makeshift school in a city park--a collection of bungalows on a fenced-off slab of asphalt. The plan was to build a replacement school and another high school. Twelve years later, Lindsay is a pretty, dark-haired 13-year-old, with a love of theater and ballet folklorico.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 31, 1996 | ALAN EYERLY
Reducing class sizes remains a goal of Anaheim City School District officials, but the challenge is finding enough classroom space. As Supt. Roberta Thompson put it, maintaining a ratio of 20 students per teacher in the first and second grades "is not only desirable, it's critical to improving instruction." But, she added, "we have less facilities than we have kids."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 22, 1992 | CAITLIN ROTHER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Even if Pleasant Valley school officials decide not to start up middle schools in the Camarillo district, students still will have to be bused in growing numbers next year to alleviate overcrowding that will become critical in 1993.
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