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NEWS
May 26, 1997 | NICK ANDERSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The state's massive effort to shrink the size of primary-grade classes is revealing a sharp divide among Orange County school districts: Some have enough room to exploit the unprecedented opportunity, while others are shackled. In Santa Ana, the county's largest school district is already filled to bursting and officials say that in the next year they will barely be able to meet Gov. Pete Wilson's class-size-cutting goal halfway.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 26, 2005 | Joel Rubin, Times Staff Writer
Math is hardly Christina Bowers' favorite subject. At best, it ranks a distant second to the spelling tests the Huntington Beach fifth-grader often aces. But Christina was hardly complaining last week when recess ended and it was time to practice multiplication tables. In fact, she nearly cried with joy. Diagnosed with a rare and aggressive form of cancer in November, Christina, 10, is struggling to stay alive.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 7, 2012 | By Howard Blume, Los Angeles Times
Los Angeles school district officials won a key legal battle with charter schools this week, when an appeals court struck down a ruling that could have opened up vast numbers of classrooms for charters, while also creating potential hardships for traditional neighborhood schools. The decision means that charter schools will continue to receive space in much the same way as traditional schools: If the Los Angeles Unified School District puts 26 students in a classroom, then charters will be allotted rooms based on the same ratio.
NEWS
September 9, 1996 | TIMOTHY WILLIAMS and LILY DIZON and LORENZA MUNOZ, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
As school districts across Southern California struggled to cope this week with an unprecedented space crunch on elementary campuses, many discovered a similar dilemma unfolding in their adult schools. Enrollment in citizenship classes has surged, forcing districts to scramble to open new classes to meet the demand created by a threatened cutoff of government aid under new welfare reform laws.
NEWS
May 11, 1997 | DAVE LESHER and RICHARD LEE COLVIN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Determined to make California's closely watched class-size reduction program a success, Gov. Pete Wilson will propose using unanticipated tax revenues generated by the state's surging economy to boost spending on the program to $1.5 billion, which would extend the program to 1 million more children, senior administration officials said Saturday.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 18, 2007 | Howard Blume, Times Staff Writer
Two of the city's more successful charter-school companies sued the Los Angeles Unified School District on Thursday, alleging that the school district has failed to make space available for their students as required by law. Two separate suits, filed in Los Angeles County Superior Court by Green Dot Public Schools and PUC Schools, assert that the school district violates state law that stipulates "reasonably equivalent" facilities for charter schools. L.A.
NATIONAL
September 5, 2009 | Mitchell Landsberg and Jason Song
President Obama's speech to students next week may be a "teachable moment," as some educators see it, but it will not be a command performance. A combination of scheduling, academic priorities and sheer bandwidth will keep the president out of many Southern California classrooms when he goes on the air Tuesday. "We're an academic institution, and our responsibility is to cover specific content standards," said James Stratton, superintendent of schools for La Cañada Unified School District, where the school year got off to a late and rocky start because of the nearby wildfires.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 22, 2011 | By Bob Pool, Los Angeles Times
A Los Angeles Unified School District trustee has advised Woodland Hills residents that they may have to sue the school system if they want to block 600 charter school pupils from being sent to Taft High. Board member Steven Zimmer's suggestion came as hundreds of parents and students crowded into Taft's multipurpose room last week to protest the district's offer to turn over 24 of the high school's classrooms to Ivy Academia. Ivy Academia's operators would send pupils in grades 6 through 12 to the west San Fernando Valley high school under the tentative offer.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 27, 2011 | By Carla Rivera, Los Angeles Times
Garfield High physical education teacher Rosa Velasquez and students from her drill and cheer teams were two weeks from staging a production of "Grease" in the school's historic auditorium when a three-alarm arson blaze gutted the East Los Angeles landmark. That was four years ago. Since then, her students have performed in the gymnasium, in classrooms and even on muddy fields as funding issues, insurance disputes and other hurdles have delayed reconstruction. On Monday, two days after classes ended, work was finally scheduled to get underway on a $50-million rebuilding project that promises a new, state-of-the-art facility as well as a replacement of the main administration building, which was connected to the auditorium and also sustained fire damage.
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