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Claud Beltran

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FOOD
April 9, 2003 | S. Irene Virbila, Times Staff Writer
The Cheesewright Building on Green Street in Pasadena fascinates architecture buffs. Built in 1929, the handsome red brick structure once housed a U.S. Navy office where Einstein worked on various projects. Restaurateur Greg Lukasiewicz was intrigued by the mystery and lore of the building, and a few years ago leased it with the idea of turning it into a restaurant. He and his father own Restaurant Devon in Monrovia. Transforming the neglected labyrinthine space was daunting, however.
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NEWS
January 11, 2013 | By Caitlin Keller
Pinot Noir enthusiasts across the city can celebrate the varietal at this year's sixth annual Pasadena PinotFest . The event will kick off with a wine tasting on Jan. 26 and a dinner on Feb. 2 at Noir Food and Wine in Pasadena. Noir's executive chef Claud Beltran, along with chef de cuisine Jacqueline Huynh, will be serving a four-course dinner paired with vintage wines from Kosta Browne winery located in Sonoma County's Russian River Valley. Dishes on the menu will include a chanterelle mushroom custard, poached Sacramento Delta sturgeon served with farro and sautéed broccoli stems, an Australian lamb chop with potato latkes and roasted balsamic cippolini onions and, for dessert, an assortment of Indian sweets.
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NEWS
January 11, 2013 | By Caitlin Keller
Pinot Noir enthusiasts across the city can celebrate the varietal at this year's sixth annual Pasadena PinotFest . The event will kick off with a wine tasting on Jan. 26 and a dinner on Feb. 2 at Noir Food and Wine in Pasadena. Noir's executive chef Claud Beltran, along with chef de cuisine Jacqueline Huynh, will be serving a four-course dinner paired with vintage wines from Kosta Browne winery located in Sonoma County's Russian River Valley. Dishes on the menu will include a chanterelle mushroom custard, poached Sacramento Delta sturgeon served with farro and sautéed broccoli stems, an Australian lamb chop with potato latkes and roasted balsamic cippolini onions and, for dessert, an assortment of Indian sweets.
FOOD
April 9, 2003 | S. Irene Virbila, Times Staff Writer
The Cheesewright Building on Green Street in Pasadena fascinates architecture buffs. Built in 1929, the handsome red brick structure once housed a U.S. Navy office where Einstein worked on various projects. Restaurateur Greg Lukasiewicz was intrigued by the mystery and lore of the building, and a few years ago leased it with the idea of turning it into a restaurant. He and his father own Restaurant Devon in Monrovia. Transforming the neglected labyrinthine space was daunting, however.
NEWS
September 16, 2004 | Leslee Komaiko
Halie Wine Bar & Bistro 112 This cozy boite is modeled after Willi's Wine Bar, a Paris institution popular with British and American expats. But California wines are the stars here. Chef Claud Beltran's menu (the same as at neighboring restaurant Halie) is compact but compelling. * First courses $7 to $19; second courses $19 to $29. 1030 E. Green St., Pasadena; (626) 440-7087.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 28, 2009 | S. IRENE VIRBILA, RESTAURANT CRITIC
When I peered in the window of the Ice House Comedy Club in Pasadena, the performer stopped midsentence to beckon me in. Audience a little sketchy that night, I guessed. Tempting though that might have been (who couldn't use a laugh or two?), I had another destination in mind: the new wine bar Noir next door. Wine bars come and go in Pasadena, it seems, but this one is notable not only for the quality of the wines on offer but also because Claud Beltran, late of Madeleines Restaurant on Green Street, is cooking.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 6, 2000 | S. IRENE VIRBILA, TIMES RESTAURANT CRITIC
Claud Beltran, who last cooked at Dickenson West before that demure Pasadena restaurant and takeout reconfigured and became Derek's, has finally resurfaced, this time with his own restaurant. Called Cayo, it's adjacent to the Pasadena Playhouse on South El Molino Avenue. As I stroll toward Cayo one recent night for dinner, a crowd converges in front, racing up the steps of the playhouse: curtain time.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 21, 2000 | S. IRENE VIRBILA, TIMES RESTAURANT CRITIC
Rung in with a gush of parties and champagne, the year 2000 hasn't proven to be a banner one for restaurant-goers in search of the latest and greatest. The trend, instead, has been one of more modest neighborhood places. Among the pick of this year's crop: Los Feliz got a new jazz club and restaurant, Los Feliz, (2138 Hillhurst Ave., [323] 666-8666) with sophisticated fare.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 2, 2001 | ANGELA PETTERA, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Down but Not Out: Cayo, adjacent to the Pasadena Playhouse (39 S. El Molino Ave.), has closed after a year and nine months. Jokes chef-owner Claud Beltran, "At least I get a little time off." Keeping a restaurant busy at a theater proved more difficult than he anticipated--"It turned out to be a really tough location," he tells us--but he says he and his staff are ready to make a go of it somewhere else soon. Menu Action: Vincenti Ristorante chalks up its own family-style meal on Sunday nights.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 12, 2000 | ANGELA PETTERA, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Campus Eats: The California School of Culinary Arts is opening a fine-dining restaurant and cafe on its block-long Pasadena campus in which to train its students. The school has secured Grady Atkins (one of the opening partners of Perroche restaurant in the Valley) to lead the project. He's got a group of teachers in charge of rotating students through the kitchen that serves both the casual cafe and the fancier adjoining restaurant.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 16, 1997 | ANGELA PETTERA, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Two Bid D/W Adieu: Executive chef Claud Beltran has left Dickenson/West, Pasadena's celebrated catering firm/jewel box restaurant, after a disagreement with co-owner Derek Dickenson over food costs. Both parties portray the split as ultra-amicable. Dickenson won't utter a negative word about Beltran: "He's a creative, wonderful, lovely person. [Telling him to leave] was the hardest thing I've had to do in my life."
FOOD
January 20, 2011 | By S. Irene Virbila, Los Angeles Times Restaurant Critic
It's Sunday night. You can go out for Chinese, order in or ? radical idea ? cook. Some of you might get lucky and have a friend invite you over for homemade Korean barbecue or a paella. Whatever the plan, Sunday is for relaxing, for sneaking in a last dose of pleasure before the Monday-to-Friday blues start up all over again. That's why they call it "Sunday supper" as opposed to the more formal "Sunday dinner. " Lately, some of L.A.'s best restaurants have been tapping into that desire for something simple and delicious on Sunday night by offering prix-fixe suppers.
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