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Claude Dallas

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NEWS
February 6, 2005 | John Miller, Associated Press Writer
As a young game warden in the mid-1980s, Jon Heggen was ordered by his boss to read a book. The required text? "Give a Boy a Gun" by Jack Olsen, a crime writer who chronicled how poacher Claude Lafayette Dallas had killed Idaho Department of Fish and Game officers Conley Elms and Bill Pogue in an execution-style slaying in the remote Owyhee desert on Jan. 5, 1981. Dallas, 54, now bespectacled and graying, walks out of an Idaho prison a free man Sunday.
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NATIONAL
February 6, 2005 | From Times Wire Reports
Claude Dallas killed two state officers in a remote desert 24 years ago in a crime that brought him notoriety as a callous criminal and a modern-day mountain man at odds with the government. Now a bespectacled 54-year-old, Dallas is to be released from prison today after serving nearly 22 years for the execution-style slayings of Conley Elms and Bill Pogue, officers for the Idaho Department of Fish and Game.
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NEWS
June 17, 1987
Claude Dallas, the trapper convicted of killing two game wardens, pleaded innocent in Boise, Ida., to escaping from prison on Easter 1986 and was ordered to stand trial Aug. 31. Dallas was captured by FBI agents March 8 outside a Riverside, Calif., convenience store. Dallas, 37, wearing the orange jump suit of a county jail inmate, was arraigned before U.S. District Judge George Carey.
NEWS
February 6, 2005 | John Miller, Associated Press Writer
As a young game warden in the mid-1980s, Jon Heggen was ordered by his boss to read a book. The required text? "Give a Boy a Gun" by Jack Olsen, a crime writer who chronicled how poacher Claude Lafayette Dallas had killed Idaho Department of Fish and Game officers Conley Elms and Bill Pogue in an execution-style slaying in the remote Owyhee desert on Jan. 5, 1981. Dallas, 54, now bespectacled and graying, walks out of an Idaho prison a free man Sunday.
NEWS
September 4, 1987 | United Press International
Convicted killer Claude Dallas testified Thursday that he broke out of the Idaho State Prison last year because he feared guards were plotting to kill him and were using his picture for target practice. "By the end of December, 1983, I was convinced that, if they had the opportunity to rid themselves of me, they'd jump on it," Dallas said.
NATIONAL
February 6, 2005 | From Times Wire Reports
Claude Dallas killed two state officers in a remote desert 24 years ago in a crime that brought him notoriety as a callous criminal and a modern-day mountain man at odds with the government. Now a bespectacled 54-year-old, Dallas is to be released from prison today after serving nearly 22 years for the execution-style slayings of Conley Elms and Bill Pogue, officers for the Idaho Department of Fish and Game.
NEWS
April 4, 1986 | From a Times Staff Writer
Weary lawmen combing the bleak Owyhee Desert of northern Nevada for escaped killer Claude Dallas reported little progress Thursday and appealed for more help from the public. But Humboldt County Sheriff James Bagwell said that Dallas--almost certainly aided by confederates--could be far away by now. Meanwhile, the Ada County, Ida.
NEWS
March 12, 1987
So-called "mountain man" Claude Dallas was on his way back to Idaho to finish his 30-year prison term for manslaughter in the 1981 shooting deaths of two game wardens and to face an additional charge of escape, which could add five years. Dallas, who was captured in Riverside on Sunday after 11 months at large, marked his 37th birthday by being turned over to Ada County, Ida., sheriff's deputies. He had already waived extradition proceedings.
NEWS
March 9, 1987 | KENNETH REICH, Times Staff Writer
Claude Dallas, the escaped killer of two Idaho game wardens who had vowed never again to be taken alive, was captured--unarmed and without a fight--Sunday afternoon in Riverside, the FBI said. A self-described "Mountain Man," Dallas, 36, is a romantic folk hero to some people who admire his "Old West" toughness, but he is considered by law enforcement authorities in several Western states to be a cold-blooded killer. He had been on the FBI's 10 Most Wanted list for months.
NEWS
September 17, 1989 | CHARLES HILLINGER, Times Staff Writer
Forty Nevada law enforcement officers, including FBI and DEA agents, police, deputies and game wardens, carried picket signs protesting the auction here Saturday of "Mountain Man" Claude Dallas' personal effects. The auction netted close to $10,000 for Dallas' defense fund set up by friends and admirers to win him a new trial in the latest episode in the continuing saga of the hunter-trapper considered a cold-blooded killer by most, a folk hero by some.
NEWS
April 27, 2001 | From Associated Press
An unrepentant, defiant Claude Dallas was denied parole Thursday for the 1981 slayings of Idaho game wardens Bill Pogue and Conley Elms. Dallas, who addressed the Idaho Commission of Pardons and Parole by telephone from a Kansas prison, expressed no remorse. He scorned such restrictions as drug testing or electronic monitoring as a condition of early release. He said he would rather serve another four years behind bars than be freed under close supervision. "By God, I will not submit.
NEWS
September 17, 1989 | CHARLES HILLINGER, Times Staff Writer
Forty Nevada law enforcement officers, including FBI and DEA agents, police, deputies and game wardens, carried picket signs protesting the auction here Saturday of "Mountain Man" Claude Dallas' personal effects. The auction netted close to $10,000 for Dallas' defense fund set up by friends and admirers to win him a new trial in the latest episode in the continuing saga of the hunter-trapper considered a cold-blooded killer by most, a folk hero by some.
NEWS
September 5, 1987 | Associated Press
Claude Dallas, the convicted killer who eluded authorities for nearly a year after fleeing the Idaho State Penitentiary in March, 1986, was acquitted Friday of escape charges. Dallas, serving 30 years for voluntary manslaughter for killing two wardens in 1981, said he fled the prison because he feared that prison guards planned to kill him during an expected prisoner riot. A jury of 12 returned the verdict after 5 1/2 hours.
NEWS
September 4, 1987 | United Press International
Convicted killer Claude Dallas testified Thursday that he broke out of the Idaho State Prison last year because he feared guards were plotting to kill him and were using his picture for target practice. "By the end of December, 1983, I was convinced that, if they had the opportunity to rid themselves of me, they'd jump on it," Dallas said.
NEWS
June 17, 1987
Claude Dallas, the trapper convicted of killing two game wardens, pleaded innocent in Boise, Ida., to escaping from prison on Easter 1986 and was ordered to stand trial Aug. 31. Dallas was captured by FBI agents March 8 outside a Riverside, Calif., convenience store. Dallas, 37, wearing the orange jump suit of a county jail inmate, was arraigned before U.S. District Judge George Carey.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 6, 1987 | United Press International
A woman who has started a legal defense fund to free convicted game warden killer Claude Dallas said Tuesday that officials may have aided Dallas' prison escape to get more money for the beleaguered Idaho prison system. "I don't know who gave him the bolt cutters, but there's been some speculation," Laura Miller said.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 9, 1986
Beginning a few months after Claude Dallas murdered two game wardens in 1981 and extending into 1984, I searched for why a cop-killer became a folk hero. The result was "Outlaw: The True Story of Claude Dallas." What I found was that the brutal murders had distinctly divided opinion in the Idaho-Oregon-Nevada region. Some wanted to lynch Dallas. Others actively helped him to remain at large and, when captured, to escape. My facts have never been disputed, even in Calendar's reckless "Manhunt--How True?"
NEWS
September 5, 1987 | Associated Press
Claude Dallas, the convicted killer who eluded authorities for nearly a year after fleeing the Idaho State Penitentiary in March, 1986, was acquitted Friday of escape charges. Dallas, serving 30 years for voluntary manslaughter for killing two wardens in 1981, said he fled the prison because he feared that prison guards planned to kill him during an expected prisoner riot. A jury of 12 returned the verdict after 5 1/2 hours.
NEWS
March 13, 1987 | MARK A. STEIN, Times Staff Writer
In their yearlong pursuit of escaped killer Claude Dallas Jr., FBI agents relied on patience, persistence, a keen sense of human nature--and a little help from his friends--the bureau's lead agent in the manhunt said Thursday. "I read where Claude Sr. (the fugitive's father) said something about us being like fleas on a dog--well, I like that," FBI Special Agent George Calley said. "We were like fleas on a dog--because most everywhere he went, we went, too."
NEWS
March 12, 1987
So-called "mountain man" Claude Dallas was on his way back to Idaho to finish his 30-year prison term for manslaughter in the 1981 shooting deaths of two game wardens and to face an additional charge of escape, which could add five years. Dallas, who was captured in Riverside on Sunday after 11 months at large, marked his 37th birthday by being turned over to Ada County, Ida., sheriff's deputies. He had already waived extradition proceedings.
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