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Claude K Bell

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NEWS
September 21, 1988 | BURT A. FOLKART, Times Staff Writer
The self-described "nut on dinosaurs" who created a concrete prehistoric panorama seen by millions of Southland desert travelers has died in Anaheim. Claude K. Bell, whose giant creations are visible for miles along a stretch of Interstate 10 in Cabazon near Palm Springs, was 91 when he died Monday of pneumonia at Humana Hospital.
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NEWS
September 21, 1988 | BURT A. FOLKART, Times Staff Writer
The self-described "nut on dinosaurs" who created a concrete prehistoric panorama seen by millions of Southland desert travelers has died in Anaheim. Claude K. Bell, whose giant creations are visible for miles along a stretch of Interstate 10 in Cabazon near Palm Springs, was 91 when he died Monday of pneumonia at Humana Hospital.
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NEWS
September 20, 1988 | Associated Press
Claude K. Bell, whose dinosaur creations became a landmark to millions of Southern California desert travelers, has died at 91. Bell died Monday of pneumonia at Humana Hospital in Anaheim. The retired sculptor for Knott's Berry Farm spent more than two decades and $300,000 creating the giant creatures--a 150-ton, concrete brontosaurus named Dinney and a 100-ton tyrannosaurus named Rex--on an otherwise desolate stretch of Interstate 10 near Palm Springs.
MAGAZINE
September 27, 1998 | Tim Harrison
First the Ice Age. Now this! For those traveling east on that blighted expanse known as Interstate 10, they're a break from the sprawl of bad stucco and tinted glass, an actual roadside attraction that harks back to days spent in the back seat of the family station wagon. Dinney and Rex, those larger-than-lifesize dinosaurs residing next to the Wheel Inn out in Cabazon, have long been an invitation to exhale and readjust your gaze--until now.
MAGAZINE
November 8, 1998
The Cabazon dinosaur site has been one of my favorite Southern California landmarks for many years, and I'm dismayed at what Gary Kanter and the Kanter Family Trust have already done there ("Hold the Pterodactyls," by Tim Harrison, So SoCal, Sept. 27). The sight of the huge dinosaurs framed by the stark backdrop of the desert--which com- bined to create an odd, uniquely Californian work of public art--has been severely compromised. Allowing the construction of a garish Burger King suggests what disrespect Kanter has for the monument he owns.
MAGAZINE
November 27, 2005 | Martin J. Smith, Martin J. Smith is acting editor of the magazine and the author of five books, including "OOPS: 20 Life Lessons from the Fiascoes That Shaped America," which HarperCollins will publish in March.
The first time I saw the dinosaurs of Cabazon, looming like a kitschy desert mirage on the north side of Interstate 10, I was a young news reporter racing to cover the Liberace deathwatch in Palm Springs.
NEWS
August 16, 2000 | SCOTT GOLD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was almost 30 years ago now that the mayor of this sun-bleached town decided the stately stucco dinosaurs overlooking Interstate 10--which are to Cabazon what the Arc de Triomphe is to Paris--needed to go. He couldn't have been more wrong. The roadside attractions, a brontosaurus with a gift shop in her belly and a tyrannosaurus with a slide on his tail, are still here, grinning sheepishly across the edge of the Riverside County desert.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 27, 2005 | Ashley Powers, Times Staff Writer
Dinny the roadside dinosaur has found religion. The 45-foot-high concrete apatosaurus has towered over Interstate 10 near Palm Springs for nearly three decades as a kitschy prehistoric pit stop for tourists. Now he is the star of a renovated attraction that disputes the fact that dinosaurs died off millions of years before humans first walked the planet.
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