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Claude Raymond

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NEWS
February 11, 2000
Former Haitian Gen. Claude Raymond, 69, the once-dreaded chief of ousted dictator Jean-Claude Duvalier's army. Raymond became Duvalier's chief of staff and interior minister when the dictator succeeded his father, Francois "Papa Doc" Duvalier, who died in 1971 after 14 years of repressive rule. Raymond, who had been a bodyguard and army chief to the senior Duvalier, retired shortly thereafter. After the younger Duvalier was ousted in 1986, Raymond declared himself a candidate for the presidency.
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NEWS
February 11, 2000
Former Haitian Gen. Claude Raymond, 69, the once-dreaded chief of ousted dictator Jean-Claude Duvalier's army. Raymond became Duvalier's chief of staff and interior minister when the dictator succeeded his father, Francois "Papa Doc" Duvalier, who died in 1971 after 14 years of repressive rule. Raymond, who had been a bodyguard and army chief to the senior Duvalier, retired shortly thereafter. After the younger Duvalier was ousted in 1986, Raymond declared himself a candidate for the presidency.
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NEWS
December 30, 1987
Six officials from the ousted Duvalier regime have registered to run in Haiti's Jan. 17 presidential election, a judicial official said. The election replaces one in November that was canceled by violence that took 34 lives. An independent Electoral Council barred Duvalierists in that vote. However, the new council, appointed by the military-led government, has said it will probably not disqualify any candidates.
NEWS
September 25, 1988 | DON A. SCHANCHE, Times Staff Writer
Fears of an armed uprising by civilian thugs and graft-tainted officers deposed in Haiti's "sergeants' revolt" and hopes for clear and rapid steps toward long-thwarted democracy preoccupied both soldiers and political leaders Saturday as the officers and noncoms now running the country completed their first week of power in an atmosphere of unusual calm. The danger of a possible counterattack by loyalists of ousted Gen.
NEWS
September 25, 1988 | DON A. SCHANCHE, Times Staff Writer
Fears of an armed uprising by civilian thugs and graft-tainted officers deposed in Haiti's "sergeants' revolt" and hopes for clear and rapid steps toward long-thwarted democracy preoccupied both soldiers and political leaders Saturday as the officers and noncoms now running the country completed their first week of power in an atmosphere of unusual calm. The danger of a possible counterattack by loyalists of ousted Gen.
SPORTS
September 30, 2004 | From Associated Press
The Expos' era in Montreal ended with a 9-1 loss to Florida on Wednesday night, a game delayed for 10 minutes when players were pulled off the field after a fan threw a golf ball that landed near second base. Hours after baseball announced that the 36-year-old franchise will be moved next season to Washington, D.C., a crowd of 31,395 showed up at Olympic Stadium for its final chance to say farewell.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 4, 1986 | KEITH OWENS
Two San Diego residents and two French citizens were identified Friday as the victims of a fatal plane crash here on Thursday, county coroner's deputies said. The pilot, Frederic Nemes, 29, and his wife, Olga, 27, lived in the 900 block of Agate Street. Claude Raymond Bridier, 52, and his wife, Jacqueline, also 52, were from France.
NEWS
January 16, 1988 | From Times Wire Services
Most former associates of deposed dictator Jean-Claude Duvalier were finally barred Friday from running for president in Sunday's general elections. A complex supreme court decision ruled that Claude Raymond, Duvalier's former military chief, and former financial adviser Clovis Desinor, as well as three other Duvalierist candidates, could not run because of their ties with the dictatorship.
NEWS
July 22, 1990 | DON A. SCHANCHE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Bitter quarreling among pro-democracy politicians, coupled with renewed street violence and a surprisingly open flaunting of strength by supporters of the ousted Duvalier dictatorship, have set Haiti back sharply in its stumbling march toward free elections. Provisional President Ertha Pascal Trouillot, already under fire for her sluggish performance since she was elevated from the Supreme Court in March, has refused to give in to demands that she resign.
SPORTS
September 7, 1993 | From Associated Press
Scott Sanderson struggled with the Angels, but the veteran right-hander is flourishing in San Francisco. Sanderson, waived by the Angels after losing nine in a row, pitched six shutout innings Monday in the Giants' 4-1 victory over the Pittsburgh Pirates at San Francisco. Sanderson helped the Giants increase their lead in the National League West to 3 1/2 games over the Atlanta Braves, who lost to the Dodgers, 2-1, on Monday.
NEWS
December 30, 1987
Six officials from the ousted Duvalier regime have registered to run in Haiti's Jan. 17 presidential election, a judicial official said. The election replaces one in November that was canceled by violence that took 34 lives. An independent Electoral Council barred Duvalierists in that vote. However, the new council, appointed by the military-led government, has said it will probably not disqualify any candidates.
SPORTS
May 8, 1991 | ALLAN MALAMUD
Love those Shea Stadium fans. They booed and taunted Darryl Strawberry unmercifully most of Tuesday night and cheered him wildly when he hit a home run in the sixth inning. . . . I wonder who would win a fielding contest between the 1962 Mets and the 1991 Dodgers. . . . Lenny Dykstra should count his blessings that he was luckier in that Pennsylvania car crash than in those Mississippi poker games. . . . Alcohol is a bigger problem than drugs in sports. . . .
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