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April 8, 1996 | DIANE HAITHMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Actress Claudette Sutherland says she didn't really have a focus for her autobiographical one-woman show, "Dog Man," until one event brought it all together: Her father died. Sutherland says "Dog Man"--currently drawing positive reviews at Hollywood's Matrix Theater--was originally intended to be an autobiographical book. She had been working on her life story in bits and pieces, reading them to fellow writers' workshop members and at a friend's cafe in New York.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 8, 1996 | DIANE HAITHMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Actress Claudette Sutherland says she didn't really have a focus for her autobiographical one-woman show, "Dog Man," until one event brought it all together: Her father died. Sutherland says "Dog Man"--currently drawing positive reviews at Hollywood's Matrix Theater--was originally intended to be an autobiographical book. She had been working on her life story in bits and pieces, reading them to fellow writers' workshop members and at a friend's cafe in New York.
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 15, 1998
* "The Cave Dwellers"--William Saroyan's warmhearted drama, with Claudette Sutherland, left, Wesley Mann, J. Steven Marcus and Katy Boyer, continues through Jan. 24 at 24th Street Theatre. * "Life Support"--A man and a woman are unexpectedly drawn together as they await word about their ill loved ones in a new play opening Friday at Actors Alley at El Portal in North Hollywood.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 25, 1991 | SYLVIE DRAKE
Can "Other People's Money" fit other people's stages? "Yes" is the answer indicated by the Pasadena Playhouse production's move to tighter quarters at the Westwood Playhouse. Even the Deborah Raymond set squeezes onto the smaller stage, with some loss of spaciousness but not of functionality. Director Kevin Conway (who gives a sizzling lead performance as Larry the Liquidator) has made minor adjustments to accommodate the new space.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 22, 1995 | LAURIE WINER, TIMES THEATER CRITIC
The Matrix Theatre has a policy of mixing and matching its casts, as it does in its smart new production of Samuel Beckett's "Endgame." In a performance seen Friday night, Robin Gammell played the lord of the manor, Hamm, as a chatty wisecracker. He's less grandiose than the other Hamm--Charles Hallahan--who fills the stage with puffed-up nobility. Consequently, the play's focus shifted a bit, particularly to Allan Arbus' Nagg, Hamm's crotchety, much abused dad.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 1, 1996 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Four years ago, Dirk Shafer, struggling to get a foothold in Hollywood, felt he had lucked out when he was named Playgirl magazine's centerfold of the year. The only catch was that Shafer is gay, and he had no idea what he would be in for in living a lie for a full year. From this experience Shafer has written and directed the clever "Man of the Year."
ENTERTAINMENT
March 29, 1996 | SCOTT COLLINS
Claudette Sutherland's "Dog Man" at the Matrix Theatre is a powerful revelation, a one-woman show that starts with a modest reminiscence and builds to a shuddering emotional climax. Sutherland--a compact woman with a pixieish face (she originated the role of Smitty in "How to Succeed in Business Without Really Trying" on Broadway in 1962)--performs on a virtually bare stage, seamlessly weaving together distant and recent past into a moving and deeply forgiving portrait of her father.
NEWS
November 1, 1993 | BILL HIGGINS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
In a way, Pulitzer Prize-winning playwright Abe Burrows had the last word against the disease that killed him in 1985. Or at least the last song. Wednesday at the Regent Beverly Wilshire, the Alzheimer's Assn. used Burrows' "How to Succeed in Business Without Really Trying" (for which Frank Loesser wrote the music and lyrics) as the centerpiece for its "A Night at Sardi's" fund-raiser, which netted $210,000.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 22, 1988 | NANCY MILLS
Some years ago, novelist Sara Davidson had an unpleasant experience with a male gynecologist. "I had a problem," she recalls, "and he said, 'I'll give you some magic pills and that will solve the problem. Don't worry, it's not one of those funny things.' " 'You mean it's not cancer?' I asked. I didn't like being talked to as a 3-year-old." Davidson, the author of "Loose Change," "Friends of the Opposite Sex" and "Rock Hudson: His Story," eventually discovered the Santa Monica Women's Clinic.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 15, 1995 | LAURIE WINER, TIMES THEATER CRITIC
"I could be bounded in a nutshell, and count myself a king of infinite space--were it not that I have bad dreams," said Hamlet. Hamm, the tattered protagonist of Samuel Beckett's "Endgame" is the king of that nutshell. He reigns in a concrete basement, in a filthy robe that was once royal red. He is attended by his vexed servant Clov and annoyed by two ancient, dusty parents, Nagg and Nell. They pop up occasionally from the trash bin in which they live, sucking on dog biscuits.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 24, 1997 | LAURIE WINER, TIMES THEATER CRITIC
J.B. Priestley's 1932 "Dangerous Corner" is the kind of play in which every character has a shocking secret, or seven--even the dead ones. In fact, the six key players confess to so many moral crimes and hidden passions that the play starts to sound like one of those "Carol Burnett Show" parodies. This is a household in which the phrase, "But why--why--in God's name, how could you?," is much more likely to be asked than "How are you?" Director Andrew J.
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