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Claudio Abbado

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March 14, 1988 | MARTIN BERNHEIMER, Times Music Critic
The Chamber Orchestra of Europe, which returned to Royce Hall on Friday after a two-year absence, is an ensemble without a home. Originally united in an international youth orchestra, its young players decided to form an independent organization in 1981. Since then, they have frequently regathered for prestigious tours and festival appearances. Their regular conductor is a gentleman named James Judd.
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ENTERTAINMENT
June 27, 2013 | By Mark Swed, Music Critic
Last summer the New York Philharmonic attempted Stockhausen's devilishly difficult “Gruppen” for three orchestras. Each orchestra has its own conductor. Music director Alan Gilbert sweated bullets conducting one. The composer Magnus Lindberg sweated bullets conducting a second one. Both demonstrated why the work is rarely performed. Only for the third orchestra did the conductor seem in his element and the music pop out with the arresting immediacy that demonstrated why "Gruppen" is a landmark of the 1950s avant garde.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 17, 1987 | MARTIN BERNHEIMER, Times Music Critic
The Vienna Philharmonic played it safe Sunday night at Pasadena Civic Auditorium, where the orchestra appeared for a one-night stand under the auspices of the Ambassador Foundation. The program, for which the best tickets cost $60, was restricted to a pair of ever-popular Beethoven symphonies. The conductor was Claudio Abbado, the glamorous Italian music director of the Vienna Staatsoper and, as such, the resident orchestral boss by default.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 7, 2009 | Mark Swed
Milan will be greener next year thanks to Mahler and Claudio Abbado. It may have been internal opera politics that ultimately drove the great Italian conductor out of La Scala, where he served as music director from 1968 to 1986, but Abbado -- along with his left-wing Milanese pals pianist Maurizio Pollini and the late Marxist composer Luigi Nono -- was always controversial in the larger political arena as well. Variety reports that after a 23-year self-imposed absence, Abbado finally agreed to return to La Scala and conduct two Mahler symphonies only if the city plants 90,000 trees.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 25, 1998 | John Henken
Listening to these suave readings, it is hard to believe that these concertos were ever considered difficult for either fiddlers or public. This is almost a case of playing that is too good to be true to the character of the music. Midori is refined and technically immaculate and Abbado and his Berliners are patrician in support--the resources of this team are truly awesome and everywhere evident.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 6, 1990 | BETH KLEID, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
About Abbado: Italian maestro Claudio Abbado, in West Berlin on Tuesday, led the Berlin Philharmonic in a rehearsal just hours before formally becoming leader of the world-famed orchestra. Abbado, 57, was picked in October to succeed Herbert von Karajan, who died in July, 1989. Abbado arranged to sign his seven-year contract late Tuesday. The terms provided for automatic renewal until 2002.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 5, 1990 | From Times Wire Services
Italian maestro Claudio Abbado has signed a seven-year contract with the Berlin Philharmonic, succeeding the late Herbert von Karajan. Abbado, 57, was picked last October by orchestra members to succeed Von Karajan, who died in July, 1989. Orchestra spokesman Helge Gruenewald declined to say how much Abbado will be paid under the contract signed Tuesday, but the newspaper Der Tagesspiegel said the maestro will receive salary and benefits totaling $500,000 a year.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 11, 1991 | ALEENE MacMINN, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Abbado Out: Claudio Abbado resigned as music director of the Vienna State Opera on Thursday for what he termed health reasons. He did not specify the nature of the problems in his letter of resignation to opera director Eberhard Waechter. There have been rumors of disagreements between Waechter and Abbado, and some people familiar with the workings of the orchestra suggested that might have contributed to the resignation.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 7, 2009 | Mark Swed
Milan will be greener next year thanks to Mahler and Claudio Abbado. It may have been internal opera politics that ultimately drove the great Italian conductor out of La Scala, where he served as music director from 1968 to 1986, but Abbado -- along with his left-wing Milanese pals pianist Maurizio Pollini and the late Marxist composer Luigi Nono -- was always controversial in the larger political arena as well. Variety reports that after a 23-year self-imposed absence, Abbado finally agreed to return to La Scala and conduct two Mahler symphonies only if the city plants 90,000 trees.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 25, 2003 | Chris Pasles; Mark Swed; Daniel Cariaga; Richard S. Ginell
Schubert: Lieder With Orchestra Anne Sofie von Otter, mezzo-soprano; Thomas Quasthoff, baritone; Chamber Orchestra of Europe; Claudio Abbado, conductor (Deutsche Gramophon) *** 1/2 The interest here lies more in the orchestrations by composers other than Schubert than in the fine live performances of these songs. Schubert sets the standard first off with his limpid scoring of the Romanze from "Rosamunde." Others honor his genius more or less meticulously.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 18, 2001 | MARK SWED, TIMES MUSIC CRITIC
Before flying to New York to open the Carnegie Hall season on Oct. 3, the Berlin Philharmonic took a vote to see how the members of this famed orchestra felt about travel to the United States. They chose to continue as planned with their American tour, which concluded at the Orange County Performing Arts Center with two concerts Monday and Tuesday nights.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 19, 2001 | VICTORIA LOOSELEAF, Victoria Looseleaf is a frequent contributor to Calendar
Standing 6 feet 1, with long blond hair, Keri-Lynn Wilson is no ordinary maestra . Indeed, music is as natural as breathing for the 34-year-old, Winnipeg-born conductor who makes her Hollywood Bowl debut this week with the Los Angeles Philharmonic. The daughter of a music educator who was also conductor of the Winnipeg Youth Orchestra, she studied flute, piano and violin as a child, playing in orchestras since age 8.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 21, 2001 | MARK SWED, TIMES MUSIC CRITIC
Poppies in Lancaster. The coast aflame in bright splashes of yellow and bold purples. Night-blooming jasmine scenting our evenings. Spring, even in seasonless Southern California, breaks out, awakening us to the great outdoors we take for granted. And Roberto Abbado, who appeared with the Los Angeles Philharmonic for the first time Thursday night at the Dorothy Chandler Pavilion, might be viewed as the orchestra's spring gift.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 21, 2000 | DANIEL CARIAGA
Comparisons are irrelevant when two of the world's great orchestras--some would say the two greatest--reinvestigate Dvorak's ubiquitous "New World" Symphony. It is enough to say that, with ideal transparency, perfect balances and splendid directness, these performances by the Berlin and Concertgebouw ensembles do the beloved work justice. Perhaps Abbado's reading is more outgoing, perhaps Harnoncourt's more probing--it hardly matters: This is as wonderful as the old piece can sound.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 25, 1998 | John Henken
Listening to these suave readings, it is hard to believe that these concertos were ever considered difficult for either fiddlers or public. This is almost a case of playing that is too good to be true to the character of the music. Midori is refined and technically immaculate and Abbado and his Berliners are patrician in support--the resources of this team are truly awesome and everywhere evident.
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