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HEALTH
April 30, 2001 | BOB CONDOR, CHICAGO TRIBUNE
How clean is too clean? How dirty can we be and still be healthy? No matter which hygiene question you prefer to ask, this is one matter best mediated by one hand washing the other. Let Dr. Gary Noskin explain. "Always stop to wash your hands when they are visibly soiled," said Noskin, medical director of infection control at Northwestern Memorial Hospital in Chicago, who has conducted numerous studies on the subject.
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NEWS
October 25, 2012 | By Noelle Carter
Lemons are so handy in the kitchen. Sure, they're great for flavor, but it's so easy to overlook how indispensable they can be as a natural kitchen cleanser. Here are a few quick tips and cleaning uses for lemons: Garbage disposal deodorizer. Chop up a lemon (or lemon peel, or orange) and throw it in the disposal before running. Your kitchen will go from funky to fresh in no time. Soak mineral deposits, scum and build-up with a little lemon juice. The juice will soften the build-up for easy removal.
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HEALTH
March 8, 2004 | Melissa Healy, Times Staff Writer
In households with young children, they have become a standard fixture sinkside. Foamy, glittery, neon-colored or fruity, antibacterial soaps are to today's parents what a warm hat was to their parents: a guardian against illness and a visible yardstick of good parenting. As it turns out, plain soap would do just as well. (But don't forget your hat.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 24, 2012 | By Anna Gorman, Los Angeles Times
Six teenagers have shown up in two San Fernando Valley emergency rooms in the last few months with alcohol poisoning after drinking hand sanitizer, worrying public health officials who say the cases could signal a dangerous trend. Some of the teenagers used salt to separate the alcohol from the sanitizer, making a potent drink that is similar to a shot of hard liquor. "All it takes is just a few swallows and you have a drunk teenager," said Cyrus Rangan, director of the toxicology bureau for the county public health department and a medical toxicology consultant for Children's Hospital Los Angeles.
HEALTH
May 17, 2004 | Jane E. Allen
With peanut allergy the third most common allergy in young children and the most common in older kids, teens and adults, there's been considerable discussion of how best to protect allergic people from inadvertent exposure to peanuts. Soap-free hand sanitizers apparently aren't enough.
MAGAZINE
April 26, 1992
I've learned through PETA that household cleansers are poured into the eyes of immobilized and conscious rabbits so that the products can bear a warning saying, "Don't put this in your eyes." Because of Newkirk and her ilk, it's now possible to walk into a supermarket and find all kinds of non-animal-tested products labeled as such. How many of us would do as much toward making the world a kinder, saner place? LORRAINE FEATHER La Crescenta
BUSINESS
December 14, 1987 | CARLA LAZZARESCHI, Times Staff Writer
After decades of proudly touting itself as one of the city's oldest companies, Los Angeles Soap Co.--whose White King label was a California household staple for more than a century--is quietly winding down its 127-year-old operation and preparing to slip out of business. In a letter sent to shareholders earlier this month, Andrew K. Forthmann Sr.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 5, 2000 | SANDY YANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When 23 Junior ROTC students were rushed to local hospitals a few years ago after being overcome by fumes, officials first assumed they had a major toxic scare on their hands. But they discovered that the sickening fumes were caused by a seemingly innocent mistake: cadets adding bleach to floor cleaner while cleaning a restroom. Mixing cleaning products is considered one of the most common household hazards, though experts say many people don't know about the danger until it's too late.
NEWS
April 21, 2000 | SUSAN CARPENTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Most people base their purchasing decisions on time and money, but some take it one step further--they put their money where their values are. Those contemplating "going green" in celebration of Earth Day's 30-year anniversary Saturday may find it difficult when it comes to housecleaning products. It is hard to tell what products are truly Earth-friendly--not just marketed as such--and which work, because few green products are rated.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 24, 1992 | JIM HERRON ZAMORA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Los Angeles fire officials graphically showed the dangers of using gasoline as a cleaning fluid Thursday by igniting a demonstration fire on the charred site of a gasoline explosion that left a Sun Valley man critically injured and his family homeless.
SCIENCE
January 2, 2010 | By Amina Khan
Disinfectants, be they hand sanitizers or industrial-strength cleaners, present a hospital's first blockade against bacterial infection. But this same weapon may be helping create stronger microbial enemies: superbugs that are resistant to disinfectants and commonly used antibiotics, scientists report in the January issue of the journal Microbiology. Researchers from the National University of Ireland in Galway studied lab cultures of Pseudomonas aeruginosa , which lives in soil and water.
HEALTH
December 3, 2007 | Mary Beckman, Special to The Times
For years before the mid-1980s, groundwater in parts of Southern California was contaminated with toxic solvents, yet the federal body responsible for tracking this didn't investigate the potential health threat to people who were drinking contaminated tap water. A congressional committee is now investigating why that neglect occurred. Here's a closer look at what scientists know about the main solvents of concern and their health effects.
BUSINESS
September 23, 2007 | David Colker
The myth: Mr. Clean Magic Eraser pads are being banned because they contain formaldehyde. The reality: For once, some bad news about a product turns out to be untrue. But the rumor has become so widespread that the pads' producer, Procter & Gamble Co., posted a denial on its website: "Formaldehyde is not and has never been an ingredient." The background: Snopes.com, which investigates online rumors, started getting inquiries about the cleaning pads in 2004.
HEALTH
August 27, 2007 | Chris Woolston, Special to The Times
The products: In past ages, people generally didn't wash their hands until they had an obvious reason, perhaps involving livestock or topsoil. Or both. But in these germ-conscious times, removing dirt is almost an afterthought when we step up to the sink. Our main goal is the total and utter destruction of E. coli, salmonella, campylobacter, rhinoviruses and any other germs that might have the nerve to make us sick. Regular soap doesn't kill many germs directly.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 11, 2007 | Roy Rivenburg, Times Staff Writer
Was a legendary punk rocker arrested for possession of ... soap? That's the question surrounding last week's jailing of Germs drummer Don Bolles after a traffic stop in Newport Beach. Bolles, 50, whose real name is Jimmy Michael Giorsetti, said in an interview that he and his girlfriend were driving to an Alcoholics Anonymous meeting Wednesday evening when police pulled over his 1968 Dodge van for a broken taillight.
NATIONAL
May 10, 2006 | Marla Cone, Times Staff Writer
Tons of chemicals in antibacterial soaps used in the bathrooms and kitchens of virtually every home are being released into the environment, yet no government agency is monitoring or regulating them in water supplies or food. About 75% of a potent bacteria-killing chemical that people flush down their drains survives treatment at sewage plants, and most of that ends up in sludge spread on farm fields, according to Johns Hopkins University research.
BUSINESS
September 18, 1993 | MICHAEL PARRISH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The first U.S. climber to conquer Mt. Everest now aspires to be the Fuller Brush man of environmentalism. Jim Whittaker, who climbed the Himalayan peak in 1963, has launched a direct-sales company to market environmentally benign household products. More than 800 part-time environmentalists/entrepreneurs in Oregon and Washington already preach preservation while they sell cleansers, soaps and toilet paper through Greenway, Whittaker's 2-year-old firm. His next target market: California.
NEWS
August 25, 2002 | RENEE TAWA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In these germ-phobic times, you begin to wonder: Just how long do you have before lurking viruses and bacteria take you down? Oh, but this is America, land of the pre-moistened towelettes, where scary-sounding microbes--think flesh-eating bacteria, if you will--purportedly can be warded off with a little know-how. Walk into any Gelson's market, for instance.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 6, 2005 | Diane Haithman
IT seems unlikely that playwright David Mamet, known for his liberal use of profanity, will ever clean up his language. But thanks to cast member and environmental activist Ed Begley Jr., a lot of other cleaning up is going on behind the scenes at the Mark Taper Forum, where Mamet's newest play, "Romance," is currently onstage until Nov. 20.
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