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Clement Haynsworth

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NEWS
October 8, 1987 | GARY LIBMAN, Times Staff Writer
If Supreme Court nominee Robert H. Bork is beginning to feel that nobody likes him in Washington, he might take some comfort from the experiences of Judge Clement Haynsworth and former Judge John Parker. Despite the trauma of an embarrassing negative Senate vote, Parker, whose Supreme Court nomination was blocked in 1930, and Haynsworth, passed over in 1969, went on to prove that there is life after rejection.
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NEWS
November 23, 1989 | From Staff and Wire Reports
Clement F. Haynsworth Jr., whose 1969 nomination to the Supreme Court by President Richard M. Nixon was rejected by the Senate because of questions about his judicial ethics and views on minorities, died of a heart attack Wednesday. He was 77. The semi-retired federal judge died at home. His wife, Dorothy, said her husband had suffered from a heart ailment in the last year but had continued to hear cases part-time.
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NEWS
November 23, 1989 | From Staff and Wire Reports
Clement F. Haynsworth Jr., whose 1969 nomination to the Supreme Court by President Richard M. Nixon was rejected by the Senate because of questions about his judicial ethics and views on minorities, died of a heart attack Wednesday. He was 77. The semi-retired federal judge died at home. His wife, Dorothy, said her husband had suffered from a heart ailment in the last year but had continued to hear cases part-time.
NEWS
October 8, 1987 | GARY LIBMAN, Times Staff Writer
If Supreme Court nominee Robert H. Bork is beginning to feel that nobody likes him in Washington, he might take some comfort from the experiences of Judge Clement Haynsworth and former Judge John Parker. Despite the trauma of an embarrassing negative Senate vote, Parker, whose Supreme Court nomination was blocked in 1930, and Haynsworth, passed over in 1969, went on to prove that there is life after rejection.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 3, 1988 | Associated Press
Federal Judge Clement F. Haynsworth Jr. was listed in stable condition Thursday after being hospitalized two days earlier for heart problems, a Greenville Memorial Hospital spokesman said. Haynsworth, 75, had an irregular heartbeat but did not have a heart attack, the spokesman said. Haynsworth was nominated to the U.S. Supreme Court by President Richard M. Nixon in 1969, but the Senate rejected the nomination.
NEWS
July 10, 1987 | United Press International
William Wilkins Jr., a federal circuit court judge in Greenville, S.C., who had been considered a leading candidate to become head of the FBI, today withdrew his name from consideration for the post. In announcing Wilkins' action, presidential spokesman Marlin Fitzwater said, "He was not offered the position but he was interviewed and was a candidate that we were considering." A source said Wilkins took his name out of consideration because he wanted to remain on the bench.
NEWS
November 22, 1989 | From Times staff and wire service reports
Clement F. Haynsworth Jr., whose nomination by President Richard M. Nixon to the Supreme Court was rejected by the Senate because of his business practices and views on minorities, died of a heart attack today at his home. He was 77. President Dwight D. Eisenhower named Haynsworth in 1957 to the U.S. 4th Circuit Court of Appeals in Richmond, Va. He spent 17 years as chief justice on the court before retiring in 1981.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 12, 2002 | MYRNA OLIVER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
You have the right to remain silent. Anything you say can and will be used against you in a court of law. You have the right to speak to an attorney, and to have an attorney present during any questioning. If you cannot afford a lawyer, one will be provided for you at government expense. --Miranda rights * John P. Frank, the constitutional scholar, professor and lawyer whose defense of Ernesto Miranda before the U.S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 1, 1988
Early in 1988, members of the Senate Judiciary Committee and leaders of the American Bar Assn. will meet to review the role played by the ABA in rating nominations for the federal judiciary. The meeting will be useful if it serves to clarify and improve the role played by the Bar. A 15-member committee of the Bar association has for about 40 years reviewed and rated nominees.
NEWS
August 1, 1992 | From Associated Press
Former federal appeals court Judge G. Harrold Carswell, who was nominated to the U.S. Supreme Court by President Richard M. Nixon then rejected by the Senate in a bitter political battle, died Friday. Carswell, who was 72, died of lung cancer, said his son Scott Carswell of Tallahassee. The former U.S. 5th Circuit Court of Appeals judge died at Tallahassee Memorial Regional Medical Center, his son said. The elder Carswell had retired in the mid-1970s and lived in nearby Monticello.
OPINION
July 13, 2005 | Erwin Chemerinsky, Erwin Chemerinsky is a professor at Duke Law School.
Only 12 days have passed since Justice Sandra Day O'Connor announced that she was stepping down from the Supreme Court, but already a great deal of misinformation about the judicial selection and confirmation process has been spread. Let's try to separate the myths from the reality. Myth: Selecting federal judges, including Supreme Court justices, is the prerogative of the president, and the Senate owes deference to his choice.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 12, 1993 | JAMES P. PINKERTON, James P. Pinkerton, based in Washington, is a senior fellow at the Manhattan Institute
Just about everybody came out a winner in Tuesday's Gore-Perot North American Free Trade Agreement debate. The vice president's televised star turn pushed him up a notch in the White House hierarchy. Gore is still behind Hillary Rodham Clinton, but he definitely has Dave Gergen, the spin czar, eating his dust.
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