Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsCleveland Clinic
IN THE NEWS

Cleveland Clinic

SPORTS
March 20, 1997 | From Associated Press
Figure skating star Scott Hamilton, a four-time world champion and the 1984 Olympic gold medalist, has been told he has testicular cancer, his public relations firm said Wednesday. The diagnosis was made by Eric Klein, a urologist, and Ronald Bukowski, an oncologist, of the Cleveland Clinic Foundation. Hamilton, 38, performed in Peoria, Ill., on Sunday night despite suffering from severe stomach pain during the last several weeks.
Advertisement
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 31, 2000
Rene Favaloro, 77, Argentine surgeon who pioneered coronary bypass surgery. In 1967, Favaloro performed the first bypass operation on a 51-year-old woman at the Cleveland Clinic in Ohio, using a saphenous vein taken from the patient's leg to detour blood around blockages in her heart. The technique is now routinely performed on millions of people each year. Before Favaloro's breakthrough, coronary heart disease had been treated only with medication.
BUSINESS
January 31, 1997 | From Newsday
Ever since last summer, when a medical researcher reported that the zinc lozenge Cold-Eeze effectively reduces the severity and duration of colds, there's been a run on the remedy nationwide. Now it turns out the researcher, Dr. Michael Macknin of the Cleveland Clinic Foundation, knew he was onto a good thing: He purchased stock in the lozenge manufacturer, Quigley Corp. of Doylestown, Pa., before his favorable research was published in July.
SCIENCE
January 15, 2008 | Thomas H. Maugh II, Times Staff Writer
The heavily advertised drug Vytorin is no better than an inexpensive generic drug at blocking the damaging effects of high cholesterol levels, according to new data released by the drug's manufacturers Monday. In a study of 720 patients funded by the manufacturers, Vytorin -- a combination of the drugs simvastatin and ezetemibe -- reduced levels of LDLs, the so-called bad cholesterol, by about 29% more than simvastatin alone.
HEALTH
November 21, 2011 | By Karen Ravn, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Americans tend to like their fats saturated, their grains processed, their protein grown on legs and their sugar added anywhere their sweet tooth decides it would like some. As for fiber, they're all for it - in, say, their French fries or the pickles on their burger. In a related development, nutrition experts tend to be bummed out by the typical American diet. In fact, many wish we'd trade it in for a diet that's pretty much the opposite, namely, the Mediterranean diet, which favors monounsaturated fat, whole (unprocessed)
ENTERTAINMENT
April 1, 2014 | By Ryan Faughnder
Maria Bartiromo's new Sunday morning show on Fox News Channel opened with strong ratings, according to data from Nielsen.  "Sunday Morning Futures with Maria Bartiromo," which airs each week at 7 a.m. PT (10 a.m. ET), averaged 1.078 million viewers, more than the combined total audience for "Fareed Zakaria GPS" on CNN and the first hour of "Melissa Harris-Perry" on MSNBC.  Among 25-to-54-year-olds, the most coveted demographic for news programming, "Sunday Morning Futures" delivered 312,000 viewers, up 19% compared with Fox News' average in the time slot so far this year.  ON LOCATION: Where the cameras roll Bartiromo's coverage focused largely on the sign-up deadline for the Affordable Care Act, and guests included Cleveland Clinic Chief Executive Toby Cosgrove, former Treasury Secretary Lawrence Summers and drug company Merek's chief executive, Kenneth Frazier.
SPORTS
April 19, 2012 | By Lance Pugmire
A yearlong study of boxers' and mixed martial-arts fighters' brain activity has found those who fight for more than six years begin to experience damage and those who fight longer than 12 years expose themselves to an even greater decline each time they return to the ring. "What we've found suggests changes and damage in the brain happens years before symptoms emerge," said Dr. Charles Bernick, author of the study. "It's what we see in Alzheimer's and Parkinson's patients. " Bernick has supervised MRIs and computerized and cognitive tests of an estimated 170 fighters at the Cleveland Clinic's Las Vegas center in the past year.
NEWS
January 10, 1998 | From Times Wire Reports
A man who lost his voice in a motorcycle accident 19 years ago rasped "Hello" and "Hi, Mom" just a few days after what is believed to be the first larynx transplant since 1969. Timothy Heidler, 40, could be speaking in a normal voice in five months or less, doctors at the Cleveland Clinic said. In a 12-hour surgery on Sunday, Heidler received the larynx, part of the trachea and 70% of the throat of an unidentified donor.
NATIONAL
November 30, 2006 | From Times Wire Reports
Drug-coated stents raise the risk of potentially lethal blood clots in heart patients as much as fivefold compared with bare-metal devices, a Cleveland Clinic Foundation study has found. The researchers analyzed 14 studies involving 6,675 heart patients who received the two stent models sold in the U.S. Concerns about stent-related clotting first drew attention in September, when European doctors tied drug-coated stents to higher death rates.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 25, 1988 | From Staff and Wire Reports
Oil from cold water fish, shown by several studies to help prevent heart attacks, may work its magic by retarding a growth protein that promotes clogged arteries, a Cleveland researcher says. Paul L. Fox of the Cleveland Clinic Research Institute said that test-tube experiments showed that oil extracted from the flesh of fish that live in cold water decreases levels of a protein called the platelet-derived growth factor.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|