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NEWS
March 8, 1993
Peter C. Nolan, 52, thoracic and cardiovascular surgeon who performed more than 14,000 open-heart surgeries. Nolan, a native of Philadelphia, was educated at Miami University in Ohio and Temple University Medical School. He began his surgical practice at the Cleveland Clinic. In 1977, he joined the Scripps Memorial Hospital in La Jolla, where he specialized in heart bypass surgery. On Feb. 26 in Solana Beach of colon cancer.
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NATIONAL
December 4, 2005 | From Times Wire Reports
A cardiologist testifying in Merck & Co.'s federal trial in Houston over Vioxx accused the drug maker of engaging in scientific misconduct, suppressing clinical evidence and stifling medical discourse as it promoted the painkiller. Eric Topol, chairman of the cardiovascular medicine department of the Cleveland Clinic, said Vioxx could cause heart attacks anytime after a patient began taking it, and that its risks were apparent as early as 1999, when the drug was approved.
NEWS
September 20, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
A judge in Cleveland has scheduled a hearing on evidence from defense attorneys who say DNA clears a man who has served 13 years in prison on a rape conviction. Michael Green, 35, was convicted of raping a cancer patient at the Cleveland Clinic. The woman died after testifying that Green attacked her. Green was sentenced to 20 to 50 years in prison. Cuyahoga County officials are reviewing the evidence and say they are likely to seek their own DNA testing.
NEWS
September 16, 2011 | By Amina Khan, Los Angeles Times / for the Booster Shots blog
Yes, you read that right. A Chinese man had to have an eel surgically removed from his bladder after a mishap while undergoing an unusual spa treatment. Zhang Nan, a 56-year-old resident of Hubei province, was bathing with live eels, in the hopes that the tiny, serpentine critters would nibble away layers of dead skin, revealing more youthful-looking skin below. It's similar to those unusual pedicures that have fish eat dead skin off people's feet -- except that you're fully submerged, and you're probably naked, and there are eels all over you. Anyway, Nan felt a sharp pain, realized a 6-inch eel had entered his penis and was wriggling up through his urethra.
SPORTS
March 20, 1997 | From Associated Press
Figure skating star Scott Hamilton, a four-time world champion and the 1984 Olympic gold medalist, has been told he has testicular cancer, his public relations firm said Wednesday. The diagnosis was made by Eric Klein, a urologist, and Ronald Bukowski, an oncologist, of the Cleveland Clinic Foundation. Hamilton, 38, performed in Peoria, Ill., on Sunday night despite suffering from severe stomach pain during the last several weeks.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 31, 2000
Rene Favaloro, 77, Argentine surgeon who pioneered coronary bypass surgery. In 1967, Favaloro performed the first bypass operation on a 51-year-old woman at the Cleveland Clinic in Ohio, using a saphenous vein taken from the patient's leg to detour blood around blockages in her heart. The technique is now routinely performed on millions of people each year. Before Favaloro's breakthrough, coronary heart disease had been treated only with medication.
BUSINESS
January 31, 1997 | From Newsday
Ever since last summer, when a medical researcher reported that the zinc lozenge Cold-Eeze effectively reduces the severity and duration of colds, there's been a run on the remedy nationwide. Now it turns out the researcher, Dr. Michael Macknin of the Cleveland Clinic Foundation, knew he was onto a good thing: He purchased stock in the lozenge manufacturer, Quigley Corp. of Doylestown, Pa., before his favorable research was published in July.
SCIENCE
March 14, 2006 | Denise Gellene, Times Staff Writer
Intensive doses of a cholesterol-lowering statin drug have for the first time cleared sticky plaque lodged in arteries, opening the possibility of a nonsurgical method of treating the major cause of heart attacks, researchers reported Monday. The results were seen in a study of 500 patients taking the highest recommended dosage of Crestor -- 40 milligrams -- quadruple the typical starting dose of 10 milligrams.
SPORTS
April 19, 2012 | By Lance Pugmire
A yearlong study of boxers' and mixed martial-arts fighters' brain activity has found those who fight for more than six years begin to experience damage and those who fight longer than 12 years expose themselves to an even greater decline each time they return to the ring. "What we've found suggests changes and damage in the brain happens years before symptoms emerge," said Dr. Charles Bernick, author of the study. "It's what we see in Alzheimer's and Parkinson's patients. " Bernick has supervised MRIs and computerized and cognitive tests of an estimated 170 fighters at the Cleveland Clinic's Las Vegas center in the past year.
HEALTH
August 24, 2011 | By Melissa Healy, Los Angeles Times
For patients with high levels of so-called bad cholesterol, doctors routinely reach for two remedies: cholesterol-lowering statin drugs and a diet that cuts out foods high in saturated fat, such as ice cream, red meat and butter. But new research has found that when it comes to lowering artery-clogging cholesterol, what you eat may be more important than what you don't eat. Released online Tuesday in the Journal of the American Medical Assn., the study found that incorporating several cholesterol-lowering foods — such as soy protein and nuts — into a diet can reduce bad cholesterol far more effectively than a diet low in saturated fat. In fact, the authors assert, levels of LDL, the "bad" cholesterol, can drop to half that seen by many patients who take statins, sold under such names as Lipitor, Crestor or Zocor.
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