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SPORTS
March 20, 1997 | From Associated Press
Figure skating star Scott Hamilton, a four-time world champion and the 1984 Olympic gold medalist, has been told he has testicular cancer, his public relations firm said Wednesday. The diagnosis was made by Eric Klein, a urologist, and Ronald Bukowski, an oncologist, of the Cleveland Clinic Foundation. Hamilton, 38, performed in Peoria, Ill., on Sunday night despite suffering from severe stomach pain during the last several weeks.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 31, 2000
Rene Favaloro, 77, Argentine surgeon who pioneered coronary bypass surgery. In 1967, Favaloro performed the first bypass operation on a 51-year-old woman at the Cleveland Clinic in Ohio, using a saphenous vein taken from the patient's leg to detour blood around blockages in her heart. The technique is now routinely performed on millions of people each year. Before Favaloro's breakthrough, coronary heart disease had been treated only with medication.
BUSINESS
January 31, 1997 | From Newsday
Ever since last summer, when a medical researcher reported that the zinc lozenge Cold-Eeze effectively reduces the severity and duration of colds, there's been a run on the remedy nationwide. Now it turns out the researcher, Dr. Michael Macknin of the Cleveland Clinic Foundation, knew he was onto a good thing: He purchased stock in the lozenge manufacturer, Quigley Corp. of Doylestown, Pa., before his favorable research was published in July.
NEWS
September 16, 2011 | By Amina Khan, Los Angeles Times / for the Booster Shots blog
Yes, you read that right. A Chinese man had to have an eel surgically removed from his bladder after a mishap while undergoing an unusual spa treatment. Zhang Nan, a 56-year-old resident of Hubei province, was bathing with live eels, in the hopes that the tiny, serpentine critters would nibble away layers of dead skin, revealing more youthful-looking skin below. It's similar to those unusual pedicures that have fish eat dead skin off people's feet -- except that you're fully submerged, and you're probably naked, and there are eels all over you. Anyway, Nan felt a sharp pain, realized a 6-inch eel had entered his penis and was wriggling up through his urethra.
HEALTH
January 31, 2011 | By Chris Woolston, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Humans can out-smile, out-smirk and out-glower every other animal on the planet, all thanks to an array of facial muscles lying just below the skin. The muscles flex and twitch throughout out the day whether we think about them or not. Lately, facial muscles have been getting a lot of attention. Many books, DVDs and websites claim that it's possible to lift sags, smooth out wrinkles and generally turn back the clock simply by giving the face a regular, vigorous workout. Carolyn's Facial Fitness, an exercise kit sold online for about $40, includes a DVD demonstrating 28 exercises that contort the face in ways you probably didn't know were possible, a CD to help pace the exercises and an instruction booklet.
NEWS
January 10, 1998 | From Times Wire Reports
A man who lost his voice in a motorcycle accident 19 years ago rasped "Hello" and "Hi, Mom" just a few days after what is believed to be the first larynx transplant since 1969. Timothy Heidler, 40, could be speaking in a normal voice in five months or less, doctors at the Cleveland Clinic said. In a 12-hour surgery on Sunday, Heidler received the larynx, part of the trachea and 70% of the throat of an unidentified donor.
NATIONAL
November 30, 2006 | From Times Wire Reports
Drug-coated stents raise the risk of potentially lethal blood clots in heart patients as much as fivefold compared with bare-metal devices, a Cleveland Clinic Foundation study has found. The researchers analyzed 14 studies involving 6,675 heart patients who received the two stent models sold in the U.S. Concerns about stent-related clotting first drew attention in September, when European doctors tied drug-coated stents to higher death rates.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 25, 1988 | From Staff and Wire Reports
Oil from cold water fish, shown by several studies to help prevent heart attacks, may work its magic by retarding a growth protein that promotes clogged arteries, a Cleveland researcher says. Paul L. Fox of the Cleveland Clinic Research Institute said that test-tube experiments showed that oil extracted from the flesh of fish that live in cold water decreases levels of a protein called the platelet-derived growth factor.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 30, 1989 | From Times staff and wire reports
Allergic reactions to the natural rubber in condoms and protective gloves raise health concerns and could prevent some people from following the rules of safe sex, a dermatologist said last week. In one documented case, a woman developed hives and suffered respiratory problems within minutes after engaging in intercourse using a latex-based condom, said Dr. James Taylor of the Cleveland Clinic, author of an article published in this month's Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology.
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