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Cleveland Indians Baseball Team

SPORTS
December 17, 1999 | MIKE DiGIOVANNA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Visions of pitching in the postseason danced through Chuck Finley's head during Thursday's press conference to announce the Cleveland Indians' signing of the former Angel left-hander to a three-year, $27-million contract. "I dream every night about pitching in the playoffs and getting a chance to go to the World Series," said Finley, whose first return to Edison Field will be Aug. 25-27. "I couldn't have found a better situation than here in Cleveland. It's a perfect fit for me."
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SPORTS
December 16, 1999 | MIKE DiGIOVANNA ROSS NEWHAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Cleveland Indians are on the verge of securing what they believe will be the missing link to that elusive World Series championship. Former Angel pitcher Chuck Finley, a noted New York Yankee killer, has reached an agreement with the Indians on a three-year contract for roughly $26 million, a baseball source said Wednesday, and the Indians are expected to announce the signing of the free-agent left-hander today.
SPORTS
October 11, 1999 | MIKE DiGIOVANNA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
He was the second coming of Bill Buckner on Saturday night, vilified by his own fans for his second crucial error in three games--one that essentially cost his team the game, one that cost his team the lead. But with a few prodigious swings of his bat, Boston Red Sox third baseman John Valentin turned into the new Carlton Fisk, an October hero whose playoff performance will go down in New England baseball lore.
SPORTS
October 9, 1999 | MIKE DiGIOVANNA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As expected, the Boston Red Sox's playoff hopes rest on the right arm of Martinez. Only this appendage comes with a surgical scar and is attached to a guy who is six inches taller, three years older and has a fraction of the Q-rating of the pitcher everyone thought would carry Boston in the postseason.
SPORTS
October 6, 1999 | MIKE DiGIOVANNA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When the television camera zooms in on Roberto Alomar in the Cleveland Indian dugout, it rarely catches the star second baseman laughing, smiling or joking. Alomar is almost always sitting straight up, alert, his head still and eyes wide open, wearing a look that is intense yet serene, like that of a predator about to pounce on easy prey. "He's like an alligator," Indian shortstop Omar Vizquel said. "He's a real quiet guy who doesn't say much. He just sits there and watches everything.
SPORTS
October 5, 1999 | MIKE DiGIOVANNA
CLEVELAND AT A GLANCE Lineup *--* CF Kenny Lofton .301 SS Omar Vizquel .333 2B Roberto Alomar .323 RF Manny Ramirez .333 DH Richie Sexson .255 1B Jim Thome .277 LF David Justice .287 3B Travis Fryman .255 C Sandy Alomar .307 *--* * Analysis: The Indians, with their impressive blend of speed, contact hitters and power hitters from both sides of the plate, may have more weapons than any other team. Lofton, Vizquel and Alomar can beat you with a stolen base, a bunt or aggressive base running.
SPORTS
October 5, 1999 | TIM BROWN
When we predicted with such assurance that the Angels and Dodgers would have competitive seasons, we probably forgot to mention that the season was spring. No matter. Baseball went on without the slightest regard for clubhouse revolts on Gene Autry Way or gross insubordination in Chavez Ravine. Indeed, local entrants aside, the game thrived. Now begin the playoffs, and reporter Tim Brown has more predictions to make. National League Houston Astros vs.
SPORTS
August 1, 1999 | MIKE DiGIOVANNA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Angel General Manager Bill Bavasi left Edison Field Friday night thinking he had a trade in place to send pitcher Chuck Finley to the Cleveland Indians. But when Saturday night's game against the Minnesota Twins began, there was Finley, the 6-foot-6 left-hander, the 14-year veteran who has been an Angel institution, seemingly an Angel for eternity, on the Edison Field mound, receiving a warm ovation from a crowd of 37,011. Finley isn't going anywhere. At least, not this season.
BUSINESS
May 14, 1999
Investors cheered Thursday when the majority owner of Cleveland Indians Baseball Co. put his team up for sale. The stock, which had languished well below June's $15 offering price, soared $6.31 to close at $16.25 on Nasdaq, getting initial investors out of the red--at least on paper.
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