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NEWS
May 31, 2012 | By Neela Banerjee
WASHINGTON -- Some major U.S. corporations that support climate science in their public relations materials actively work to derail regulations and laws addressing global warming through lobbying, campaign donations and support of various advocacy groups, according to a new report by the Union of Concerned Scientists, an environmental and scientific integrity group. The multinational oil giant, ConocoPhillips, for instance, said on its website in 2011 that it “recognizes” that human activity is leading to climate change, the view supported by the overwhelming majority of scientific research.
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NEWS
March 9, 2012 | By Michael Finnegan
Rick Santorum sought to broaden his pitch to Alabama and Mississippi Republicans beyond his conservative stands on social issues Friday with scathing attacks on President Obama over national security, energy and global warming. At the same time, with the twin Deep South primaries now four days away, the former Pennsylvania senator kept up his religious appeals at a morning rally here at a museum for the Alabama battleship. Santorum described himself as "someone who understands the centrality of the family.
OPINION
February 27, 2012 | By Larry B. Stammer
It has long been a maxim that mixing religion and politics can spell trouble. So when Rick Santorum told a partisan crowd in Columbus, Ohio, recently that President Obama's worldview was based on a "phony theology" that drives "radical environmentalists," he must have known his comments would reverberate far beyond his conservative political base. Santorum was speaking of efforts to forestall the worst effects of climate change through controls on greenhouse gas emissions from fossil fuels, and policies aimed at encouraging the development of renewable sources of energy.
BUSINESS
November 16, 2010 | By Neela Banerjee, Los Angeles Times
A group of international investors responsible for more than $15 trillion in assets called Tuesday for the world's nations, particularly the United States, to move decisively to combat climate change or face economic disruptions worse than the global recession of the last two years. The statement, signed by 259 asset managers and asset owners whose holdings account for one-quarter of global capitalization, was aimed at world leaders who will meet in two weeks in Cancun, Mexico, for a United Nations conference on climate change.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 20, 2010 | By Elaine Woo, Los Angeles Times
Stephen H. Schneider, a Stanford University biologist on the vanguard of climate-change research for four decades, who argued eloquently on human culpability in global warming and willingly threw himself into the political fray to explain and defend the scientific evidence, has died. He was 65. Schneider had a heart attack Monday while flying to London from a science meeting in Stockholm, according to Stanford spokesman Dan Stober. "Steve Schneider helped the world understand that the burning of fossils had altered the chemistry of Earth's atmosphere, and that this change … had led to a discernible human influence on our planet's climate," said Benjamin D. Santer, a leading climate researcher at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, who described his colleague as the Carl Sagan of climate science.
OPINION
December 16, 2012
Re "Water demand to exceed supply," Dec. 13, and David Horsey's Dec. 14 editorial cartoon These two pieces offer an ironic juxtaposition: David Horsey's cartoon analyzes conservatives' unthinking rejection of climate change, and a report warns of rapidly dwindling water supplies in the Colorado River Basin. How many climate-change denialists live in those seven states? Our media privilege the discussion of religion, rationalizing that people are entitled to their own beliefs.
OPINION
January 25, 2014
Re "Climate change foot-dragging," Editorial, Jan. 21 Yes, the politics around climate change - denying the overwhelming scientific evidence, misinforming about weather's relationship to climate and resisting executive branch action - create a short-term battleground for localized interests and a long-term offense against every living thing. But there is also much simple ignorance and confusion among our lawmakers, who get scared not only by the causes but also by the viable solutions.
OPINION
February 20, 2012
The culture wars have been fought in the classroom for decades, waged over such issues as school prayer, the teaching of evolution and whether the Pledge of Allegiance should include the phrase "under God. " But the conflict usually pits backers of religious instruction against secularists. The latest skirmish, by contrast, is centered on a scientific issue that has nothing to do with religious teaching: climate change. Leaked documents from the Heartland Institute in Chicago, one of many nonprofits that spread disinformation about climate science in hopes of stalling government action to combat global warming, reveal that the organization is working on a curriculum for public schools that casts doubt on the work of climatologists worldwide.
OPINION
November 2, 2013
Re "Governor signs emissions pact with neighbors," Oct. 29 Gov. Jerry Brown is right to seek new ways to address climate change, but he's sabotaging his own efforts by greenlighting fracking for dirty oil in our state. The governor's support for fracking is out of step with both climate science and the electorate here, where a poll this summer found that 58% of Californians want a moratorium on the practice. To have a decent chance of avoiding the worst impacts of climate change, we have to leave most fossil fuels buried safely in the ground, as noted by the recently released report from the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change.
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