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OPINION
January 25, 2014
Re "Climate change foot-dragging," Editorial, Jan. 21 Yes, the politics around climate change - denying the overwhelming scientific evidence, misinforming about weather's relationship to climate and resisting executive branch action - create a short-term battleground for localized interests and a long-term offense against every living thing. But there is also much simple ignorance and confusion among our lawmakers, who get scared not only by the causes but also by the viable solutions.
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NATIONAL
March 27, 2013 | By Neela Banerjee, Washington Bureau
WASHINGTON — The Obama administration Tuesday announced a nationwide plan to help wildlife adapt to threats from climate change. Developed along with state and tribal authorities, the strategy seeks to preserve species as global warming alters their historical habitats and, in many cases, forces them to migrate across state and tribal borders. Over the next five years, the plan establishes priorities for what will probably be a decades-long effort. One key proposal is to create wildlife "corridors" that would let animals and plants move to new habitats.
OPINION
February 20, 2012
The culture wars have been fought in the classroom for decades, waged over such issues as school prayer, the teaching of evolution and whether the Pledge of Allegiance should include the phrase "under God. " But the conflict usually pits backers of religious instruction against secularists. The latest skirmish, by contrast, is centered on a scientific issue that has nothing to do with religious teaching: climate change. Leaked documents from the Heartland Institute in Chicago, one of many nonprofits that spread disinformation about climate science in hopes of stalling government action to combat global warming, reveal that the organization is working on a curriculum for public schools that casts doubt on the work of climatologists worldwide.
BUSINESS
November 16, 2010 | By Neela Banerjee, Los Angeles Times
A group of international investors responsible for more than $15 trillion in assets called Tuesday for the world's nations, particularly the United States, to move decisively to combat climate change or face economic disruptions worse than the global recession of the last two years. The statement, signed by 259 asset managers and asset owners whose holdings account for one-quarter of global capitalization, was aimed at world leaders who will meet in two weeks in Cancun, Mexico, for a United Nations conference on climate change.
OPINION
January 22, 2012 | By Naomi Oreskes
Recently I had jury duty, and during jury selection something remarkable occurred. Early in the proceedings, the judge posed a hypothetical question to the 60 or so potential jurors in the room: "If I were to send you out now and ask you to render a verdict, what would it be? How many of you would vote not guilty?" A few raised their hands. "How many would vote guilty?" A few more raised their hands. "And how many would say you didn't know enough to decide?" Every remaining hand — about 50 people — went up immediately.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 20, 2010 | By Elaine Woo, Los Angeles Times
Stephen H. Schneider, a Stanford University biologist on the vanguard of climate-change research for four decades, who argued eloquently on human culpability in global warming and willingly threw himself into the political fray to explain and defend the scientific evidence, has died. He was 65. Schneider had a heart attack Monday while flying to London from a science meeting in Stockholm, according to Stanford spokesman Dan Stober. "Steve Schneider helped the world understand that the burning of fossils had altered the chemistry of Earth's atmosphere, and that this change … had led to a discernible human influence on our planet's climate," said Benjamin D. Santer, a leading climate researcher at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, who described his colleague as the Carl Sagan of climate science.
NEWS
March 9, 2012 | By Michael Finnegan
Rick Santorum sought to broaden his pitch to Alabama and Mississippi Republicans beyond his conservative stands on social issues Friday with scathing attacks on President Obama over national security, energy and global warming. At the same time, with the twin Deep South primaries now four days away, the former Pennsylvania senator kept up his religious appeals at a morning rally here at a museum for the Alabama battleship. Santorum described himself as "someone who understands the centrality of the family.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 29, 2012 | By Dean Kuipers, This post has been corrected, as indicated below.
After several years of finding that fewer and fewer Americans believed in climate change, pollsters are now finding that belief is on the uptick. The newest study from the National Survey of American Public Opinion on Climate Change, which is a biannual survey taken since fall 2008 and organized by the Brookings Institute, shows that 62% of Americans now believe that climate change is occurring, and 26% do not. The others are unsure. That is a significant rise in believers since a low in spring 2010, when only about 50% of Americans said they believed in global warming, but still down from when the survey first began, when it was at around 75%. The pollsters talked to 887 people across the country.
OPINION
December 16, 2012
Re "Water demand to exceed supply," Dec. 13, and David Horsey's Dec. 14 editorial cartoon These two pieces offer an ironic juxtaposition: David Horsey's cartoon analyzes conservatives' unthinking rejection of climate change, and a report warns of rapidly dwindling water supplies in the Colorado River Basin. How many climate-change denialists live in those seven states? Our media privilege the discussion of religion, rationalizing that people are entitled to their own beliefs.
OPINION
December 24, 2010
State's new top cop Re: "Time may be right for Harris," Dec. 19 Those of us who worked with incoming state Atty. Gen. Kamala Harris' campaign and turned out to give her those winning votes will be right there with this visionary to make the much-needed changes she advocates for California's criminal justice policies. Perhaps Los Angeles County Dist. Atty. Steve Cooley, who has sent dozens of people to death row and proudly pointed out the difference between his record and Harris', should take note as his own geographic voter base gave Harris the votes needed to win this statewide election.
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