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Climate Treaty

NEWS
May 2, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
Sen. John McCain (R-Ariz.) criticized the Bush administration for scrapping rather than trying to fix the 1997 Kyoto climate treaty and its mandatory pollution reductions to curb heat-trapping greenhouse gases. "I wouldn't have done that," the former presidential contender said in an interview. "I don't agree with everything in the Kyoto Protocol, but I think it is a framework we could have continued to work with. We could have fixed it."
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NEWS
March 28, 2001 | Associated Press
The Bush administration has no plans to implement the 1997 climate treaty negotiated in Kyoto, Japan, because it's clear that Congress won't ratify it anyway, the chief of the Environmental Protection Agency said Tuesday. "We have no interest in implementing that treaty," EPA Administrator Christie Whitman told reporters, although she said President Bush continues to believe that global warming is an issue of concern.
OPINION
April 10, 2011 | Mark Lynas, Mark Lynas is the author of "Six Degrees: Our Future on a Hotter Planet" and "High Tide: The Truth About Our Climate Crisis." He lives in Oxford, England. He blogs at www.marklynas.org
What a strange turn of events. Instead of uniting the environmental movement in renewed opposition to nuclear power, the Fukushima disaster in Japan has divided it still further. An increasing number of green advocates, including some very prominent voices, have declared their support for nuclear power as a clean energy option, even as radioactive water accumulates and the timeline for cleaning up the contaminated areas extends by decades. Can they be serious? They can. The irony of Fukushima is that in forcing us all to confront our deepest fears about the dangers of nuclear power, we find many of them to be wildly irrational -- based on scare stories propagated through years of unchallenged mythology and the repeated exaggerations of self-proclaimed "experts" in the anti-nuclear movement.
BUSINESS
February 21, 2010 | By Margot Roosevelt
An hour outside Manaus, the Amazon's biggest city, the blackened remains of a virgin forest smolder. Chain saws whine. And Jonas Mendes tosses logs, one after another, into his kiln. "I know it's wrong to cut down the trees," said Mendes, 48, sweat streaming down his neck and torso. "But I have no other way to make a living." Under a lean-to, his teenage son hacks charcoal into pieces with a machete. His wife fills 110-pound plastic bags that sell for $4 each. If the Obama administration succeeds in its pledge to curb climate change, billions could flow from the U.S. to help forest dwellers such as Mendes change their ways.
NEWS
April 1, 2001 | From Associated Press
European environment ministers said Saturday that the Kyoto global warming treaty is still "alive" and that they will go forward with ratification plans--with or without the United States. The ministers, who gathered in this city 90 miles above the Arctic Circle, condemned President Bush's rejection of mandatory reductions of carbon dioxide emissions called for under the 1997 climate treaty. Bush said Thursday that the compulsory reductions were too harmful to the U.S. economy.
NEWS
November 11, 2001 | From Associated Press
Heat-trapping carbon dioxide emissions jumped 3.1% in the United States last year, the biggest one-year increase since the mid-1990s, the Energy Department reported Friday. Carbon dioxide emissions in 2000 were nearly 14% higher than in 1990, the department's Energy Information Administration said. The global-warming pact that President Bush rejected this year commits industrialized countries to roll back "greenhouse" gas emissions to 1990 levels. The unusually large increase in U.S.
OPINION
August 4, 2012
Responding to Robert Bryce's July 27 Op-Ed article on coal-generated electricity, "Dirty but essential," Irvin Dawid wrote in a letter published Wednesday: "Bryce begins his Op-Ed article on coal at Peabody Energy's huge North Antelope Rochelle Mine near Gillette, Wyo. Is that really the best place to get an idea as to how 'essential' coal is to our future? "I would point Bryce to a Georgia Power Co.plant featured in a July 14 NPR report. The plant manager explained all the reasons why his plant converted from coal to natural gas - part of a wave of conversions that accounts for the two fuels each being responsible for about one-third of the nation's electricity production.
OPINION
January 23, 2007
Re "Feinstein, Boxer differ on global warming," Jan. 18 Sen. Dianne Feinstein's (D-Calif.) plan is too timid; Sen. Barbara Boxer's (D-Calif.) is better because it supports California's right to lead by example in a very crucial area. That said, neither plan is sufficient. Right now, the people of California need a joint effort by our environmentally aware senators to set in motion a series of events that will in two years have the United States ready to ratify the Kyoto treaty -- and to end China and India's exemption very soon thereafter.
OPINION
August 1, 2012
Re "Dirty but essential," Opinion, July 27 Robert Bryce begins his Op-Ed article on coal at Peabody Energy's huge North Antelope Rochelle Mine near Gillette, Wyo. Is that really the best place to get an idea as to how "essential" coal is to our future? I would point Bryce to a Georgia Power Co.plant featured in a July 14 National Public Radio report. The plant manager explained all the reasons why his plant converted from coal to natural gas - part of a wave of conversions that accounts for the two fuels each being responsible for about one-third of the nation's electricity production.
NEWS
April 21, 2001 | From Associated Press
The Bush administration rejects the Kyoto, Japan, global warming treaty "under any circumstances" and sees little chance that talks this summer will produce a suitable substitute, a State Department memo says. Despite comments by a top U.N. official that the administration might be shifting its position, the cable to diplomatic and consular posts also said negotiations to ratify the 1997 Kyoto Protocol do not appear to be leading to agreement.
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