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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 19, 2014 | By Larry Gordon
About a quarter of UC students, faculty and staff reported that they had experienced some exclusionary, intimidating or offensive situations on campus and 9% said those incidents had interfered with their ability to study or work, according to a survey released by the university system Wednesday. Those results in the long-awaited Campus Climate survey elicited mixed responses from leaders of the 10-campus UC system. They said they were pleased that 73% of UC undergraduates reported feeling comfortable or very comfortable in their classes and just about 6% said they felt uncomfortable.
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NATIONAL
March 19, 2014 | By Neela Banerjee
WASHINGTON - As part of its campaign to address climate change, the White House on Wednesday unveiled a website to serve as a one-stop location for the enormous amount of climate data housed at different federal agencies. The initiative to make the information easily accessible to communities, researchers and industries trying to adapt to global warming is the White House's latest move to deliver on a pledge President Obama made in June: to use his executive authority to confront climate change in light of congressional inaction.
SCIENCE
March 15, 2014 | By Deborah Netburn
In the rings of ancient and gnarled trees, scientists have found evidence of a period of an unusual stretch of warmth and wetness in Mongolia between the years 1211 and 1225 — the exact time that Genghis Khan was in power. Coincidence? They think not. This unusual period of mild temperatures and unprecedented rain in an area traditionally known for its cold and arid climate would probably have increased the productivity of grasslands of the Mongolian steppe, the researchers say. The abundant grass would in turn increase the number of grazing animals that could live off it. Members of Genghis Khan's army reportedly had five horses apiece, which allowed them to swiftly conquer an enormous area that stretched from East Asia to Eastern Europe, as well as parts of northern India and the Middle East.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 14, 2014 | By Dean Kuipers
We generally think of climate change as a story of sky - of emitted gases, of atmospheric carbon levels, of storms. Author Kristin Ohlson would like to direct our gaze earthward, to take a long, hard look at the dirt beneath our feet. We may have overlooked a solution there. In her sometimes breathless but important new book, "The Soil Will Save Us," Ohlson lays out a thesis that farmers and climate researchers have been talking about for decades: that a change in farming and forestry techniques could sequester enough carbon in the ground to not only mitigate but reverse global warming.
NEWS
March 10, 2014 | By Lalita Clozel
WASHINGTON-- You could look at it as a filibuster without the bill. After the last round of votes concludes Monday night, 28 senators plan to talk the night away in series of speeches delivered on the chamber floor, focused on climate change. Although some call it a political stunt, the senators insist the event -- organized by the Climate Action Task Force -- will raise public awareness about global warming and how to stem it.  “So many senators coming together for an all-night session shows our commitment to wake up Congress to the dangers of climate change,” Sen. Barbara Boxer (D-Calif.)
NEWS
March 5, 2014 | By Amy Hubbard
Chipotle stirred up the media and guacamole lovers with news that it could "suspend" guacamole from its menu due to global warming. But a restaurant spokesman tells the Los Angeles Times: "This is way overblown. "  The annual report from the restaurant chain warned: "Increasing weather volatility or other long-term changes in global weather patterns, including any changes associated with global climate change, could have a significant impact on the price or availability of some of our ingredients.
NATIONAL
March 4, 2014 | By Evan Halper
WASHINGTON - As international efforts to reduce greenhouse gas emissions stall, schemes to slow global warming using fantastical technologies once dismissed as a sideshow are getting serious consideration in Washington. Ships that spew salt into the air to block sunlight. Mirrored satellites designed to bounce solar rays back into space. Massive "reverse" power plants that would suck carbon from the atmosphere. These are among the ideas the National Academy of Sciences has charged a panel of some of the nation's top climate thinkers to investigate.
SCIENCE
February 19, 2014 | By Louis Sahagun
A new study broadens a notion held by the earliest criminologists: Periods of higher temperatures -- on an hour-by-hour or week-to-week basis -- are likely to produce more crime. The study by Matthew Ranson of Abt Associates, a research and consulting firm in Cambridge, Mass., suggests global warming will trigger more crimes including murders and rapes over the next century, with social costs estimated to run as high as $115 billion. Between 2010 and 2099, climate change can be expected to cause an additional 22,000 murders, 180,000 cases of rape, 1.2 million aggravated assaults, 2.3 million simple assaults, 260,000 robberies, 1.3 million burglaries, 2.2 million cases of larceny and 580,000 cases of vehicle theft, the study published this week in the Journal of Environmental Economics and Management says.
NEWS
February 17, 2014 | By Karin Klein
It's been snowing in the Eastern United States like nobody's business. Crazy, wild cold and snowstorms. Predicting the weather might be hard, but predicting that extreme cold weather will produce a lot of hot air from climate deniers is easy. In fact, the number of myths floating around about climate change is pretty extensive, and I thought it might be helpful to address them, one by one, over the course of the year. For today, though, snow and cold are on people's minds. And that means plenty of people saying that this is strong evidence, if not downright proof, that the planet is not heating up. There's an elegant, if not complete, counterargument that comes via MIT's Knight Science Journalism Tracker, one of my favorite daily blog reads.
WORLD
February 16, 2014 | By Paul Richter
JAKARTA, Indonesia - Secretary of State John F. Kerry on Sunday called on Indonesians to mobilize against climate change, part of a broader effort to enlist help from developing nations that have resisted pressure to cut greenhouse gas emissions. Speaking to a young audience at an urban shopping mall, Kerry made an impassioned argument that the archipelago's economy and physical survival is threatened as temperatures and water levels rise. He urged ordinary Indonesians to apply political pressure on leaders who, by overwhelming margins, still doubt the threat will affect their interests.
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