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NEWS
May 10, 1986 | Associated Press
China will open 12 more Tibetan peaks to foreign climbers during the next five years, the New China News Agency said Friday. Five of the new areas will open this year, including Cho Oyu, the world's sixth-highest mountain.
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NEWS
April 25, 2014 | By Karin Klein
Just go home, climbers. The adventure of scaling Mt. Everest is not as important as the concerns of the Sherpa guides who lost 13 of their own - three more are missing and presumed dead - in an avalanche. The guides are saying that they do not want to assist in any more climbs this year. They are mourning those who died, and they are fearful of conditions on the mountain. Many climbers already are showing respect for the Sherpas' situation, packing up for the year. But a few have indicated that they still plan to climb.
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NEWS
June 16, 2012 | By Laura J. Nelson
Four Japanese climbers are believed to be dead days after an avalanche roared down Alaska's Mt. McKinley and swept the group off a steep slope, the U.S. National Park Service said Saturday. As the crew of five inched down the tallest peak in North America early Thursday morning, a wave of snow 80 stories tall crashed over them, snapping the rope that kept the group connected and burying four of the climbers, said John Leonard, Denali National Park's chief mountaineering ranger.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 21, 2014 | By Christine Mai-Duc, This post had been corrected. See note below for details.
Rescuers had to airlift a rock climber out of Yosemite National Park after he suffered major injuries in a 30-foot fall Sunday, authorities said. A 26-year-old man from Palo Alto, Calif. was climbing with a partner Sunday morning and was about halfway up the Higher Cathedral Spire, one of a series of near-vertical granite pinnacles, according to Officer Andrea Brown of the California Highway Patrol's Air Operations Division. He reportedly fell about 30 feet and was unable to move without excruciating pain, Brown said.
WORLD
June 22, 2013 | By Nasir Khan and Mark Magnier
ISLAMABAD, Pakistan -- Attackers at a remote hotel used by adventure tourists in northern Pakistan killed nine foreign climbers and their guide Sunday, according to police and security officials, including five Ukrainians, three Chinese and a Russian. No one has taken immediate responsibility for the attack, which reportedly took place at about 1 a.m. The hotel in Gilgit-Baltistan doubles as a base camp for mountaineers ascending Nanga Parbat, the world's ninth-highest peak. The gunmen fled after the attack, said Deputy Inspector General of Police Ali Sher.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 23, 2010 | By Louis Sahagun, Los Angeles Times
Dicey. That's the word Doug Thompson used to describe the strenuous 11-mile hike to the summit of Mt. Whitney in October, a month of unpredictable weather that can make the first step up the trailhead near Thompson's rustic convenience store the start of a death trap. About 25,000 people ascend the 14,494-foot mountain each year, and "while a lot of them are physically strong, they don't always have much experience or the proper gear," he said. "A year ago this very week, we had a fatal accident up here.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 25, 2012 | Valerie J. Nelson, Los Angeles Times
Left for dead near the summit of Mt. Everest, Australian adventurer Lincoln Hall survived the night alone, without supplies, in temperatures well below zero. And then he got lucky. As dawn broke, one of the last teams of climbers to ascend the mountain in 2006 encountered Hall sitting cross-legged near a ledge with a precipitous drop. His first words were, "I imagine you are surprised to see me here. " The team abandoned its own summit attempt to rescue Hall, whose wife and two sons had already been told he was dead.
NATIONAL
June 17, 2012 | By Matt Pearce, This post has been corrected, as indicated below.
A broken rope is the only clue to the location of four Japanese climbers who vanished in an avalanche on Alaska's Mt. McKinley last week. And that rope - discovered in a pile of compacted ice and snow by a National Park Service mountaineer, almost 100 feet below the surface of a glacial crevasse on America's tallest mountain - may be all that remains of the climbers for a while. After the rope's discovery, it became too dangerous to keep digging, so the search for the lost climbers - Yoshiaki Kato, 64, Masako Suda, 50, Michiko Suzuki, 56, and Tamao Suzuki, 63, of the Miyagi Workers Alpine Federation - has been called off "permanently," officials said Sunday afternoon.
NEWS
May 17, 1996 | Associated Press
Trudging on despite disaster, at least eight teams clambered up the icy face of Mt. Everest on Thursday, past the frozen corpses of mountaineers who succumbed to a sudden blizzard days earlier. An Indian expedition that lost three climbers in the storm expected to reach the summit of the world's highest peak today from the northern face, the Chinese side of the mountain that straddles the border with Nepal.
NATIONAL
January 16, 2008 | From Times Wire Reports
A pair of climbers who misjudged the weather and got caught in whiteout conditions on Mt. Hood were brought to safety after spending a night in a snow cave. The two said they didn't make it to the summit of the 11,239-foot mountain on Monday because the weather closed in.
WORLD
April 20, 2014 | By Shashank Bengali
MUMBAI, India - Bill Burke, a 72-year-old mountaineer from Costa Mesa, was making his latest attempt to scale Mt. Everest's northern face when the news came of the deadliest avalanche ever on the world's highest peak. As many as 16 Nepalese mountain guides, all ethnic Sherpas, were killed Friday on the south side of the mountain, but Everest's fraternity of climbers and their guides is small. The father of Burke's Nepalese guide was among the dead; another Sherpa in his group lost two relatives, including a nephew.
HEALTH
March 21, 2014 | By Charles Fleming
This rocky landmark in Chatsworth is a worldwide draw for climbing enthusiasts. But it's also a great place to take a walk while watching the climbers practice their art on small rocks at the base and sheer cliffs near the peak. Begin a counterclockwise tour of Stoney Point Park by entering the recreation area from Topanga Canyon Boulevard, near the steel gate just uphill from the horse stables. To your immediate left, you'll see climbers and climbing teachers working out on some of the lower-elevation rocks.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 20, 2014 | By Lornet Turnbull
Chad Kellogg, an elite alpinist who climbed some of the world's highest and most challenging peaks - charging up mountains and breaking records for the fastest ascents - was killed Feb. 14 while descending Mt. Fitz Roy, a prominent peak in the Patagonia region of Argentina. He was 42. Kellogg, a Seattle resident, and his climbing partner Jens Holsten, of Leavenworth, Wash., had successfully summited the 11,000-foot mountain and were hanging together from a preestablished anchor when a rock fell, striking Kellogg and killing him instantly.
WORLD
June 22, 2013 | By Nasir Khan and Mark Magnier
ISLAMABAD, Pakistan -- Attackers at a remote hotel used by adventure tourists in northern Pakistan killed nine foreign climbers and their guide Sunday, according to police and security officials, including five Ukrainians, three Chinese and a Russian. No one has taken immediate responsibility for the attack, which reportedly took place at about 1 a.m. The hotel in Gilgit-Baltistan doubles as a base camp for mountaineers ascending Nanga Parbat, the world's ninth-highest peak. The gunmen fled after the attack, said Deputy Inspector General of Police Ali Sher.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 3, 2013 | By Kate Mather
A 28-year-old London man died while climbing El Capitan in Yosemite National Park after he was struck by a falling rock, officials said. Felix Joseph Kiernan and his climbing partner were about 600 feet up the east buttress of the popular climbing route Sunday afternoon when a 1-foot-by-2-foot rock became dislodged, park officials said. The rock fell about 150 feet before it struck Kiernan about 2 p.m. Another climbing party below the pair used a cellphone to call for help, officials said.
TRAVEL
May 13, 2013 | By Jeff Greenwald, Special to the Los Angeles Times
SPRINGDALE, Utah - There comes a moment when you step backward off a cliff, clinging to a rope the width of your pinkie, and ask yourself, "Why am I doing this?" It's inevitable. Fear of heights (and its close cousin, fear of falling) is as deeply ingrained in most of us as fear of sharks or snakes. Sometimes, though, confronting these fears is the first step to discovering a new world - a coral reef, the Amazon rainforest or the convoluted landscape of southern Utah, near Zion National Park, revealed through the fast-growing sport of canyoneering.
NEWS
December 18, 2000 | Associated Press
A layer of ice that formed overnight in northern Italy's Alps sent at least 10 climbers and skiers sliding to their deaths Sunday. Sunday's worst accident occurred near Bergamo, 30 miles east of Milan in Italy's Lombardy province, where four Italian men died, said Giancarlo Stefani, an emergency services medical director in Bergamo. One of the climbers tried to rescue a dog that had gotten in trouble and fell, Stefani said. The climber's companions died in subsequent rescue attempts.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 30, 1995
Your story on the painting of boulders at Stoney Point for a film (April 7) said, "Climbers complain that because of the paint they will be unable to grip the side of boulders. . . . " Not only does this statement portray climbers to be whiny little wimps, it is only part of the reason climbers are aggravated. Gripping boulders under adverse conditions only makes for a better climb, so the paint on the rock will in a way serve to improve bouldering skills. I am in no way advocating the painting of boulders with this statement.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 21, 2013 | Los Angeles Times staff and wire reports
After Sir Edmund Hillary's historic ascent of Mt. Everest, everyone knew Hillary's name. Far fewer knew about his indispensable partner, George Lowe. Hillary and his friend Lowe were the only two New Zealanders on the 1953 expedition to the top of the world's highest peak. If they could have had their way, they would have trekked to the summit together, but a number of circumstances, including the politics of giving two non-Brits on a British-led team the prime roles, conspired to leave Lowe among the unsung.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 2, 2013 | By Bob Pool, Los Angeles Times
Downtown skyscraper manager Peter Anastassiou knew what steps to take when asked to help with an American Lung Assn. charity event: all 1,391 in his building. His 62-story Aon Center at 707 Wilshire Blvd. will host as many as 800 stair climbers in the group's sixth annual "Fight for Air" fundraising event April 6. Access to most high-rises has been restricted for outsiders since the 9/11 terrorist attacks. But Anastassiou opens his stairwells on Tuesdays and Thursdays to people who registered for the event and want to get in shape.
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