Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsClinical Oncology
IN THE NEWS

Clinical Oncology

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
December 29, 2011 | By Karen Kaplan, Los Angeles Times/For the Booster Shots blog
Doctors and patients eager for better ways to treat advanced ovarian cancer were encouraged by two new studies showing that adding Avastin to traditional chemotherapy drugs allowed women with the disease to live a few months before their cancer returned or worsened. The two large , international studies credited Avastin with providing an additional 3.8 months and 3.6 months of “progression-free survival.” (The reports in Thursday's edition of the New England Journal of Medicine weren't able to say whether the women who took Avastin lived longer overall.)
ARTICLES BY DATE
SCIENCE
January 28, 2014 | By Mary MacVean
Practicing yoga for at least three hours a week for three months reduced the fatigue and inflammation in breast cancer survivors, compared with survivors who did no yoga, researchers reported. And the more yoga, the greater the change, the researchers, from the Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center, said. At six months - three months after the formal yoga had ended - fatigue was 57% lower in the women who had done yoga, compared with those who had not. Inflammation, measured  by blood tests, was reduced by up to 20%, the researchers said.
Advertisement
NATIONAL
March 11, 2008
Taking the breast cancer pill Femara can significantly reduce the chances that a woman's cancer will return, even long after she has stopped taking the estrogen blocker tamoxifen, researchers said in Chicago. They said post-menopausal women who took Femara from one to seven years after finishing a five-year regimen of tamoxifen reduced by 63% the risk the cancer would come back. The study results were published in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.
SCIENCE
September 24, 2013 | By Karen Kaplan
Married people who are diagnosed with the most common types of cancer are 20% less likely to die than patients who are single - and depending on the type of cancer they have, their odds of dying may be reduced by as much as 33%, new research shows. That finding raises an intriguing question: Is it possible to identify the specific benefits of marriage and put them into a hypothetical “pill” that could give the same benefits to patients who are single? It may sound far-fetched, but that's at least part of the motivation behind the new study , published online this week by the Journal of Clinical Oncology.
HEALTH
June 2, 2008
Childhood cancer: In a May 26 article on survivors of childhood cancer, Dr. Jacqueline Casillas was referred to as director of the UCLA-Livestrong Survivorship Center of Excellence. She is associate director; the director is Dr. Patricia Ganz. The article said the UCLA-Livestrong center was in the Mattel Children's Hospital. It is part of UCLA's Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center. The same article said that a study of childhood cancer survivors that found a five to 10 times greater risk of heart disease in early adulthood (compared with healthy siblings)
NATIONAL
June 2, 2008 | From Times Wire Reports
A simple blood test may be able to detect lung cancer in its early stages, which would represent a promising strategy to improve survival rates, researchers said. The two-year survival rate averages only about 15%, mainly because the disease, which kills 1.3 million people globally a year, is often diagnosed in advanced stages. Preliminary findings of a study presented in Chicago at the annual meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology suggest that a specific genetic profile for lung cancer is present in the blood and can be detected with 88% accuracy.
SCIENCE
May 17, 2008 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A growing number of women with early-stage breast cancer seem to be choosing to have the whole breast removed instead of just the cancerous lump, a Mayo Clinic study of about 5,500 women found. Mastectomies were standard treatment until 1990, when studies showed that women whose cancers were small and confined to the breast did just as well if they had less radical surgery followed by radiation. Researchers are not sure what is responsible for the new trend, but speculate that newer tests like MRI scans are finding more cancers, or flagging so many suspicious spots that women want the breast removed for peace of mind.
NEWS
January 11, 2011 | By Mary Forgione, Tribune Health
Ryan Lamantia and Walter Wetzel were two very ill young boys -- one with brain cancer, the other with leukemia. One made it, one didn't. And that's where this story starts. The boys met in a hospital during their respective treatments. This Chicago Tribune story tells what happened: "He inspired me to survive my cancer," Walter, now 17, in remission and quite the football player and snowboarder, says in the story. "Seeing him happy all the time made me happy. How could I be upset if he had it so much worse than me?"
NEWS
February 7, 2011 | By Shari Roan, Los Angeles Times
Breast cancer survival rates have improved in recent years, and women have more treatment choices, including -- in cases of early-stage cancer -- the opportunity to forgo chemotherapy. A new study shows, however, that women who undergo chemotherapy experience more symptoms in the year after surgery. Researchers led by Dr. Patricia A. Ganz of UCLA, found that women who have chemotherapy can have symptoms that persist for even a year. These include vaginal symptoms, musculoskeletal pain and weight problems.
NEWS
July 6, 2010 | By Shari Roan, Los Angeles Times
Anyone who has undergone a biopsy or other test to detect cancer knows the agony of waiting for the test results. Doctors face the dilemma of how to divulge the bad news to their patients. Call the minute you receive the results and let the patient know? Schedule a face-to-face office visit and explain the findings there? A new study suggests that doctors should usually disclose a cancer diagnosis in a personal setting, taking plenty of time to discuss what the diagnosis means and explain treatment options.
NEWS
November 13, 2012 | By Jon Bardin
Terminal cancer patients who receive information early about end-of-life care receive less medical care during their last days and are more likely to enter hospice, according to a study in the Journal of Clinical Oncology . The findings suggest that early discussion about the likely outcome of a terminal illness can dramatically change a patient's end-of-life decision-making. According to the study, which was carried out by a team led by Dr. Jennifer Mack of the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute in Boston, national guidelines suggest that doctors begin discussions about end-of-life care shortly after diagnosing a terminal illness.
NEWS
December 29, 2011 | By Karen Kaplan, Los Angeles Times/For the Booster Shots blog
Doctors and patients eager for better ways to treat advanced ovarian cancer were encouraged by two new studies showing that adding Avastin to traditional chemotherapy drugs allowed women with the disease to live a few months before their cancer returned or worsened. The two large , international studies credited Avastin with providing an additional 3.8 months and 3.6 months of “progression-free survival.” (The reports in Thursday's edition of the New England Journal of Medicine weren't able to say whether the women who took Avastin lived longer overall.)
NEWS
June 6, 2011 | By Thomas H. Maugh II, Los Angeles Times/For the Booster Shots blog
A supplement promoted for improving sexual dysfunction in women does not do so in cancer patients, but it does improve their quality of life, researchers said Monday. ArginMax for Women is marketed as a sexual enhancement aid, but its benefits for that purpose are not apparent, a team from Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center in Winston-Salem, N.C., reported at a Chicago meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology. ArginMax is made from a patented formula containing a proprietary blend of the amino acid L-arginine, ginseng, gingko and 14 vitamins and minerals noted for boosting energy and circulation and optimizing hormonal balance.
HEALTH
June 5, 2011 | By Thomas H. Maugh II, Los Angeles Times
A drug already used to treat breast cancer can reduce the risk of tumors in high- and moderate-risk post-menopausal women by 65% over a three-year period, researchers reported Saturday. Two other drugs are already approved for reducing the risk of breast tumors in healthy women: Generic tamoxifen reduces the risk by 50% over a five-year period and raloxifene (Evista) reduces the risk by 38% over a similar period. But both drugs are associated with an increased risk of potentially fatal uterine cancer and blood clots.
NEWS
June 4, 2011 | By Thomas H. Maugh II, Los Angeles Times/For the Booster Shots blog
The widely used cancer drug Avastin may benefit women with ovarian cancer, both those who are newly diagnosed and those in whom the disease has recurred after initial treatment, researchers reported Saturday at a Chicago meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology. For ovarian cancers treated early in the course of the disease, the drug reduced the risk of death. For recurrent cancers, the drug delayed progression but the improvement in survival did not quite reach statistical significance, researchers said.
NEWS
February 7, 2011 | By Shari Roan, Los Angeles Times
Breast cancer survival rates have improved in recent years, and women have more treatment choices, including -- in cases of early-stage cancer -- the opportunity to forgo chemotherapy. A new study shows, however, that women who undergo chemotherapy experience more symptoms in the year after surgery. Researchers led by Dr. Patricia A. Ganz of UCLA, found that women who have chemotherapy can have symptoms that persist for even a year. These include vaginal symptoms, musculoskeletal pain and weight problems.
SCIENCE
January 28, 2014 | By Mary MacVean
Practicing yoga for at least three hours a week for three months reduced the fatigue and inflammation in breast cancer survivors, compared with survivors who did no yoga, researchers reported. And the more yoga, the greater the change, the researchers, from the Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center, said. At six months - three months after the formal yoga had ended - fatigue was 57% lower in the women who had done yoga, compared with those who had not. Inflammation, measured  by blood tests, was reduced by up to 20%, the researchers said.
NEWS
January 11, 2011 | By Mary Forgione, Tribune Health
Ryan Lamantia and Walter Wetzel were two very ill young boys -- one with brain cancer, the other with leukemia. One made it, one didn't. And that's where this story starts. The boys met in a hospital during their respective treatments. This Chicago Tribune story tells what happened: "He inspired me to survive my cancer," Walter, now 17, in remission and quite the football player and snowboarder, says in the story. "Seeing him happy all the time made me happy. How could I be upset if he had it so much worse than me?"
NEWS
July 6, 2010 | By Shari Roan, Los Angeles Times
Anyone who has undergone a biopsy or other test to detect cancer knows the agony of waiting for the test results. Doctors face the dilemma of how to divulge the bad news to their patients. Call the minute you receive the results and let the patient know? Schedule a face-to-face office visit and explain the findings there? A new study suggests that doctors should usually disclose a cancer diagnosis in a personal setting, taking plenty of time to discuss what the diagnosis means and explain treatment options.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|