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Clint Eastwood

ENTERTAINMENT
August 31, 2012 | By Mary McNamara, Los Angeles Times
After six years, Mitt Romney is finally the Republican presidential nominee, but the man everyone's talking about is Clint Eastwood - who has apparently lost his mind. Yes, things got a little surreal down Tampa way in the run-up to Romney's much-anticipated acceptance speech Thursday night. First, "American Idol" winner Taylor Hicks sang "Takin' It to the Streets" with great and occasionally spastic enthusiasm, while CNN crawled the fact that he opened at Bally's in June, making him the first "Idol" to "secure Vegas residency.
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 30, 2012 | By Susan King
The American Cinematheque's Aero Theatre is hoping to make your Labor Day with its “Eastwood Westerns” program. The retrospective of Clint Eastwood's best sagebrush sagas begins Monday evening with his final spaghetti western for director Sergio Leone, 1966's “The Good, the Bad and the Ugly,” which also stars Eli Wallach and Lee Van Cleef. On tap for Wednesday is “The Outlaw Josey Wales,” the 1976 revisionist Western he also directed. Sondra Locke, who would be Eastwood's collaborator both on and off screen for several years, is also featured.
NEWS
August 4, 2012 | By Maeve Reston
Barack Obama may have George Clooney. But Mitt Romney's now got Clint Eastwood in his camp. Eastwood appeared at a Sun Valley fundraiser for Romney on Friday night, telling reporters that he's behind the former Massachusetts governor because “I think the country needs a boost.” Romney invited the actor and director up to the microphone at the sundown event at the Sun Valley Resort Lodge. “There is a guy here from the world of acting, who has pursued his dreams in a very unusual way. He stood up to the industry and did things his own way," Romney said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 25, 2012 | By Daniel Siegal, Los Angeles Times
Motorists on the 2 Freeway for the last couple of months have noticed a shadowy figure or two gazing into the distance from the hills above. Cardboard cutouts of Clint Eastwood, John Wayne and Gene Autry, bearing labels that read "Glendale Public Art Project 2012," have been a mystery — something their creator says is intentional. Justin Stadel, the Glassell Park resident and artist behind the cowboy cutouts, said he created the works so viewers could draw a spiritual feeling, a sense of freedom, from L.A.'s varied landscape.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 26, 2012 | By Yvonne Villarreal, Los Angeles Times
Francesca Eastwood is slouched sideways in a chair, her bare feet hanging over the seat's arm. As the 19-year-old toils on her phone - going through old photos and reading about slavery on Wikipedia - she maintains conversation with half-sister Morgan. Both young women have recently emerged from a press junket at a luxury hotel and are noticeably annoyed. "They asked so many questions about dad," Francesca says, eyes still locked on her phone screen. "I mean, like, really?" "Yeah, it's like, guys, get over it," 15-year-old Morgan dutifully agrees.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 18, 2012 | MARY MCNAMARA, TELEVISION CRITIC
In an odd yet understandable marketing strategy, the folks behind E!'s new reality show "Mrs. Eastwood & Company" have spent a lot of pre-premiere publicity time explaining what the show isn't. Which is to say, Clint Eastwood. The legendary actor and director will appear in but a few episodes and then only briefly. He will not, for instance, be slamming doors or engaging in filmed therapy sessions with his wife, Dina, around whom the show revolves (see title.) That doesn't mean the show is not about Clint Eastwood; it is. If the principal characters -- Dina, her 15-year-old daughter Morgan and 19-year old stepdaughter Francesca -- were not related to him, there would be Absolutely No Reason to watch this, which, by reality show standards, promises to be tame to the point of sedation.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 2, 2012 | By Dennis McLellan, Los Angeles Times
Early in his career as one of Hollywood's top cinematographers, Bruce Surtees became known for his artful use of low-level, moody lighting in films such as Don Siegel's "The Beguiled" and "Dirty Harry" and Bob Fosse's "Lenny. " Surtees, 74, who received an Oscar nomination for his work on "Lenny" and was closely associated with Clint Eastwood on many of his films, died Feb. 23 in Carmel, Calif., of complications of diabetes, said his wife, Carol. FOR THE RECORD: Bruce Surtees: In the March 2 LATExtra section, a photo accompanying the obituary of cinematographer Bruce Surtees was described by the source, Getty Images, as showing him with Clint Eastwood during filming of "High Plains Drifter.
NATIONAL
February 8, 2012 | By James Rainey, Los Angeles Times
Clint Eastwood has never been known as a man who had trouble making his meaning clear. So for many of those who were watching Sunday, the crusty, no-guff actor's Super Bowl ad delivered a plain message: America is staging a comeback, just like one of its big carmakers, Chrysler. It's anyone's guess whether the ad's soaring rhetoric and American-grit imagery will sell more Chrysler 300s or Town & Country minivans. But the two-minute spot immediately accomplished another, unintended goal — again forcing into high relief the nation's sharp political divide.
NATIONAL
February 8, 2012 | By David Horsey
Karl Rove claims Clint Eastwood's Super Bowl ad for Chrysler was a devious pitch to promote the Obama reelection campaign. Apparently the bulb-headed Pillsbury Doughboy of the political right thinks he's man enough to pick a fight with America's most virile octogenarian. Go ahead, Karl, make his day. In the sweepstakes for most memorable advertisement from Sunday's Super Bowl game, the Eastwood halftime ad was the clear winner. Gritty, moody, yet uplifting, the ad interspersed images of beleaguered but resilient Americans with shots of Eastwood walking toward the camera along a shadowy passageway.
NEWS
November 17, 2011 | By Rebecca Keegan, Los Angeles Times
For Leonardo DiCaprio, any story worth telling starts with a question. "Why?" the actor said, banging his fist on a table. "His personal life, his tactics, what drove him, what were his motives? What the hell did he really want?" The man instigating this particular "why" is J. Edgar Hoover, whom DiCaprio plays in the new biopic of the controversial FBI chief directed by Clint Eastwood. But the star of "J. Edgar" could as easily be asking about the other complex characters he has brought to the screen in the last decade — obsessive magnate Howard Hughes in "The Aviator," mysterious U.S. Marshal Teddy Daniels in "Shutter Island," grieving dream hijacker Dom Cobb in "Inception.
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