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Closed Captioning

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ENTERTAINMENT
February 19, 2014 | By Joe Flint
"Five wins and a very light power reese know" sounds more like gibberish than a weather forecast. But that was the closed captioning on a WeatherNation report last month. What the captioning was supposed to say was, "high winds and a very light, powdery snow. " Closed captioning is designed to help the deaf and hearing-impaired enjoy television. But the captions are often riddled with typos or incomplete sentences that leave viewers struggling to make sense of what's being said.
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 21, 2014 | By Joe Flint
After the coffee. Before rethinking my priorities in life. The Skinny: Don't you hate it when when what you are watching on TV seeps into your dreams? My dreams last night were definitely influenced by "House of Cards. " And no, there were no plastic bags in my dreams. Today's roundup includes the weekend box-office preview and a look at the legal fight over "Trouble with the Curve. " Also, a new version of "Anchorman 2" is coming and the TV academy is shaking up the Emmy Awards again.
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 21, 2014 | By Joe Flint
"Five wins and a very light power reese know" sounds more like gibberish than a weather forecast. But that was the closed caption that hearing-impaired people got during a report from the WeatherNation channel last month. What the caption was supposed to say was, "high winds and a very light, powdery snow. " Closed captioning is designed to help the deaf and hearing-impaired enjoy television and receive important news and weather reports. Unfortunately, captions are often riddled with typos and incomplete sentences that leave viewers struggling to make sense of what is being said.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 21, 2014 | By Joe Flint
"Five wins and a very light power reese know" sounds more like gibberish than a weather forecast. But that was the closed caption that hearing-impaired people got during a report from the WeatherNation channel last month. What the caption was supposed to say was, "high winds and a very light, powdery snow. " Closed captioning is designed to help the deaf and hearing-impaired enjoy television and receive important news and weather reports. Unfortunately, captions are often riddled with typos and incomplete sentences that leave viewers struggling to make sense of what is being said.
BUSINESS
June 1, 2006 | From Bloomberg News
Time Warner Inc., Walt Disney Co. and other movie distributors settled a lawsuit brought on behalf of hearing-impaired customers who bought DVDs containing bonus material that wasn't enhanced for people with hearing problems. The studios, which also include Sony Pictures Entertainment Inc. and Universal Studios Home Entertainment, deny liability and are settling to avoid further litigation, according to a statement.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 15, 1986 | DENNIS HUNT, Times Staff Writer
The rumors that have been circulating in home-video circles about the holiday-season release of "Indiana Jones and the Temple of Doom" turned out to be true. Paramount announced Thursday that the 1984 adventure film would be available Oct. 29. It was also rumored that Paramount, the pioneer of reduced-price cassettes, would offer "Indiana Jones" at $24.95--a record for a major movie. The company, however, decided on $29.95--still considerably less than the standard price for new movies, $79.95.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 20, 1998 | BILL KEVENEY, THE HARTFORD COURANT
Your television is transmitting hidden messages, but you don't need to be a crackpot to see them. You just need a remote control. The messages are closed captions, usually invisible lines of text that correspond to dialogue, music and sounds on the TV screen. Designed in the 1970s to make TV accessible to millions of viewers who are deaf or hard of hearing, closed captions until a few years ago could be seen only with the help of an expensive decoding machine. Now, they are commonplace.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 2, 1997 | MILES CORWIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Hotel Bel-Air has agreed to provide televisions with closed captioning and other devices for the hearing-impaired in a settlement reached Tuesday with the father of two deaf girls who could not watch a hotel television because it was not properly equipped, the U.S. Justice Department said. The settlement resolves a complaint filed under the Americans With Disabilities Act, said the Justice Department, which represented the family.
BUSINESS
June 28, 1993 | From Associated Press
Most televisions manufactured after Wednesday for sale in the United States will have to have built-in circuitry for decoding closed captions for hearing-impaired viewers. But the federally mandated change may have a far wider effect than originally intended. It may prove useful to patrons of noisy sports bars, those whose spouses are annoyed by the voice of "Tonight Show" host Jay Leno and children who are learning to read.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 9, 1992 | DANIEL CERONE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Jack Jason's deaf parents were visiting him in Los Angeles last week, as racial warfare was breaking out on the streets of the city, he noticed that they were staring blankly at the maelstrom of fires and assaults on the TV screen without a full sense of what was happening.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 19, 2014 | By Joe Flint
"Five wins and a very light power reese know" sounds more like gibberish than a weather forecast. But that was the closed captioning on a WeatherNation report last month. What the captioning was supposed to say was, "high winds and a very light, powdery snow. " Closed captioning is designed to help the deaf and hearing-impaired enjoy television. But the captions are often riddled with typos or incomplete sentences that leave viewers struggling to make sense of what's being said.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 7, 2013 | By Joe Flint
After the coffee. Before packing for almost two weeks in New York. The Skinny: I'm catching up on "Rectify," the new drama on Sundance. It is slow going but I'm told it is worth the effort. I just want to know how long Daniel is a cross between Karl Childers and Forrest Gump? Tuesday's news includes a story about some new glasses that will make it easier for the deaf to enjoy movies and a look at NBC's challenges heading into upfront week. Also, today I tested out emailing an alert with a link when the Morning Fix went live.
BUSINESS
May 7, 2013 | By Richard Verrier, Los Angeles Times
Raymond Smith Jr. has been trying for nearly two decades to make the movie industry listen to the needs of the deaf and hard of hearing. This month, the senior executive at Regal Entertainment Group will come closer to his goal. His company, the nation's largest theater chain, will have nearly 6,000 theater screens equipped with closed-captioning glasses that could transform the theatrical experience for millions of deaf and hard-of-hearing patrons who have shunned going to the cinema because previous aids were too clunky or embarrassing to use. PHOTOS: Hollywood Backlot moments The Knoxville, Tenn., chain has invested more than $10 million in the glasses, which were developed by Sony Electronics Inc. Resembling thick sunglasses, the device uses holographic technology to project closed-caption text that appears inside the lenses, synchronized with the dialogue on the screen . The system also includes headphones connected to a wireless receiver, with separate audio channels, which play dialogue or allow visually impaired users to listen to a narration track of the film.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 16, 2009 | Valerie J. Nelson
Marcella M. Meyer, a prominent advocate for the deaf who fought to expand civil rights and establish social services through the Greater Los Angeles Agency on Deafness, an advocacy group she helped found in 1969 and ran for almost three decades, has died. She was 84. Meyer died May 26 at Kaiser Permanente Anaheim Medical Center of an abdominal aortic aneurysm, said her daughter Coleen Ashly.
BUSINESS
June 1, 2006 | From Bloomberg News
Time Warner Inc., Walt Disney Co. and other movie distributors settled a lawsuit brought on behalf of hearing-impaired customers who bought DVDs containing bonus material that wasn't enhanced for people with hearing problems. The studios, which also include Sony Pictures Entertainment Inc. and Universal Studios Home Entertainment, deny liability and are settling to avoid further litigation, according to a statement.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 23, 2004 | From Associated Press
The U.S. Education Department has cut the money for captioning nearly 200 TV programs, citing a 1997 mandate from Congress only to pay for captioning of "educational, news and informational" programming. Advocates for the deaf say they haven't been able to find out why the department has decided to finance some programs and not others, or who's making these decisions.
BUSINESS
May 7, 2013 | By Richard Verrier, Los Angeles Times
Raymond Smith Jr. has been trying for nearly two decades to make the movie industry listen to the needs of the deaf and hard of hearing. This month, the senior executive at Regal Entertainment Group will come closer to his goal. His company, the nation's largest theater chain, will have nearly 6,000 theater screens equipped with closed-captioning glasses that could transform the theatrical experience for millions of deaf and hard-of-hearing patrons who have shunned going to the cinema because previous aids were too clunky or embarrassing to use. PHOTOS: Hollywood Backlot moments The Knoxville, Tenn., chain has invested more than $10 million in the glasses, which were developed by Sony Electronics Inc. Resembling thick sunglasses, the device uses holographic technology to project closed-caption text that appears inside the lenses, synchronized with the dialogue on the screen . The system also includes headphones connected to a wireless receiver, with separate audio channels, which play dialogue or allow visually impaired users to listen to a narration track of the film.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 17, 1997 | NICK ANDERSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Your kids watch too much TV. You can't get them to read. Actually, you can get them to do both at the same time. The answer is captioned television. New research is demonstrating that captions help many children learn to read. The program subtitles, often done with white lettering on black background at the lower part of a TV screen, link written words with images and sound. Experts say they can work for people of any age learning to read or learning English as a second language.
OPINION
March 5, 2000
Re "A World Muffled and More Distant" and "How's That?: The Aural Mechanics" (Feb. 28) and the over 26 million Americans who are hearing-impaired: I hope that these articles serve to highlight the need to continue focusing attention on closed captioning on television and movies. Nearly 10 years ago, I appeared before Congress to lobby on behalf of efforts to make closed-captioning technology mandatory in television sets 13 inches or larger. Thankfully, that bill passed. However, just a few years later, I and millions of other hearing-impaired individuals were still unable to turn on our televisions for captioned breaking news on such stories as the Los Angeles riots or the Northridge earthquake.
BUSINESS
March 4, 1998 | JANE HALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Your tax dollars at work: "Stripper Wars," wife swapping, fistfights and other staples of the popular "Jerry Springer" talk show are being captioned for hearing-impaired viewers under a grant from the U.S. Department of Education. The funding is part of a $7-million-a-year program to fund captioning on TV programs that are deemed to provide enriched educational and cultural experiences for hearing-impaired viewers.
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