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September 9, 2012 | By Adam Tschorn, Los Angeles Times
LAS VEGAS - For 6-feet-tall, 390-pound comedian Louie Anderson, finding stylish clothes that fit is no laughing matter - which is why he's collaborating on a new line of shirts for the big-and-tall man that he hopes to roll out to retail outlets early next year. "The journey for me started as a fat kid going to Robert Hall [Clothes] on 8th Street" in downtown St. Paul, Minn., Anderson said, referring to the warehouse-type chain that flourished in the mid-20th century. "Our family was so poor we'd get these vouchers for school clothes from the welfare department.
November 21, 2010 | By Adam Tschorn, Los Angeles Times
When Google took the wraps off its foray into online fashion retail a few days ago, anyone who hadn't sat through one of the nearly hour-long Web demonstrations couldn't have been faulted for thinking was just another in an increasingly crowded field of "curated retail" sites. (At launch, the site focused on women's clothing and accessories only ? with the goal of eventually expanding into menswear.) It is ? and it isn't. Aiming to serve up clothing and accessories based on personal preferences (the way Pandora suggests new music based on the music you like)
April 5, 2009 | Steffie Nelson
No doubt you've noticed the high-fashion takes on Dr. Martens by designers Yohji Yamamoto and Raf Simons, or the classic eight-hole boots that Cory Kennedy, Tennessee Thomas and other L.A. It girls are sporting in lieu of heels these days. Apparently, the grunge revival is right on schedule. But what most fashion followers don't realize about these working-class staples turned rebel regalia turned teen trend is that without a local company called NaNa, which was the brand's chief U.S.
September 14, 2012 | By Susan Carpenter
It's the rare 8-year-old who's lucky enough to have a closet stuffed with Dolce & Gabbana, but living large while growing up has its drawbacks: What's a mom to do with all the outgrown Armani button-downs? That's the situation CeCe Hendriks found herself in when she decided to launch Spoiled! , an online consignment boutique for designer children's clothes. Opened this week, predominately with castoffs from her son Jordan's closet, Spoiled! will be updated every Thursday with items from Gucci, True Religion, Louis Vuitton and other designers -- most of it priced at less than $200.
May 15, 1987 | BETTY GOODWIN
Cary Grant, in the '30s and '40s, wore his suits with the equivalent of Joan Crawford shoulders. The shoulders were unusually exaggerated, measuring some 6 1/2 inches wide. "It was a particularly good style for him, because he had small, sloping shoulders and a big head," pointed out Edward Sexton, a prominent Savile Row tailor.
June Van Dyke, producer of fashion shows and a wardrobe coordinator who was a longtime assistant to costume designer Edith Head, has died. She was 69. Van Dyke died Friday in her Los Angeles home of respiratory complications. For many years, Van Dyke managed the Cinema Glamour Shop, which sells movie and television stars' donated clothing and costumes to benefit the Motion Picture and Television Fund. She also was a tireless worker with the Screen Smart Set Auxiliary of the fund.
July 28, 1991
Thank you, Harry Shearer. At last, the Empress has clothes! MATTHEW TRULIO Castaic
June 27, 2002 | Louise Roug
The Downtown L.A. Standard rooftop bar--Open only a month, already a tough door with a guest list. The clothes: Optional (there's a pool). Otherwise, a mix of business suits and designer clothes. 550 S. Flower St., downtown L.A., (213) 892-8080. Nacional--Newly opened Cuban-themed club. On Friday nights, you gotta know someone inside. The clothes: Dress continental sophistication. Helmut Lang sleek. A "no silicone" look. 1645 N. Wilcox Ave., Hollywood, (323) 962-7712. Deep--Still a tight door.
August 28, 1994
Let me see if I have this right. La Habra plans to ban clotheslines because the City Council considers clean, sweet-smelling clothes to be a "blight." Yet La Habra is doing nothing to address the blight of traffic and air pollution. Maybe people are supposed to wear dirty clothes so that everything matches--the clothes, the cars, the air. Perhaps there is even a City Council term for this, such as coordinated-aesthetics-of-the-external-environment. I must admit it makes a California kind of sense.
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