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September 9, 2012 | By Adam Tschorn, Los Angeles Times
LAS VEGAS - For 6-feet-tall, 390-pound comedian Louie Anderson, finding stylish clothes that fit is no laughing matter - which is why he's collaborating on a new line of shirts for the big-and-tall man that he hopes to roll out to retail outlets early next year. "The journey for me started as a fat kid going to Robert Hall [Clothes] on 8th Street" in downtown St. Paul, Minn., Anderson said, referring to the warehouse-type chain that flourished in the mid-20th century. "Our family was so poor we'd get these vouchers for school clothes from the welfare department.
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April 5, 2009 | Steffie Nelson
No doubt you've noticed the high-fashion takes on Dr. Martens by designers Yohji Yamamoto and Raf Simons, or the classic eight-hole boots that Cory Kennedy, Tennessee Thomas and other L.A. It girls are sporting in lieu of heels these days. Apparently, the grunge revival is right on schedule. But what most fashion followers don't realize about these working-class staples turned rebel regalia turned teen trend is that without a local company called NaNa, which was the brand's chief U.S.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 6, 2011 | By Amy Kaufman, Los Angeles Times
Throughout his career, costume designer Mark Bridges has styled looks from diverse decades. For the 1970s-era "Boogie Nights," he outfitted Mark Wahlberg in denim bell bottoms. In "Blow," he found Johnny Depp '60s-inspired pocketed suits and turtlenecks to wear. And in last year's "Greenberg," he put Ben Stiller in a puffy vest and cable-knit sweater typical of a modern-day, middle-age slacker. But approaching the late 1920s was especially daunting for Bridges. For one, he knew it would prove difficult to track down actual materials from the period.
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November 21, 2010 | By Adam Tschorn, Los Angeles Times
When Google took the wraps off its foray into online fashion retail a few days ago, anyone who hadn't sat through one of the nearly hour-long Web demonstrations couldn't have been faulted for thinking Boutiques.com was just another in an increasingly crowded field of "curated retail" sites. (At launch, the site focused on women's clothing and accessories only ? with the goal of eventually expanding into menswear.) It is ? and it isn't. Aiming to serve up clothing and accessories based on personal preferences (the way Pandora suggests new music based on the music you like)
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September 14, 2012 | By Susan Carpenter
It's the rare 8-year-old who's lucky enough to have a closet stuffed with Dolce & Gabbana, but living large while growing up has its drawbacks: What's a mom to do with all the outgrown Armani button-downs? That's the situation CeCe Hendriks found herself in when she decided to launch Spoiled! , an online consignment boutique for designer children's clothes. Opened this week, predominately with castoffs from her son Jordan's closet, Spoiled! will be updated every Thursday with items from Gucci, True Religion, Louis Vuitton and other designers -- most of it priced at less than $200.
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September 11, 2011 | By Heather John, Special to the Los Angeles Times
The city of Los Angeles estimates that cloth makes up about 10% of local landfills, either from discarded clothes or remnants from garment manufacturing. In addition, it takes a lot of chemicals to produce fabric. At the rate kids grow into and out of their clothes, parents might want to consider shopping at resale stores. Here is a guide to some local offerings. Blue Bird 652 Larchmont Blvd., Los Angeles, (323) 466-0408 This is one of the city's best upscale consignment shops for kids, with a large assortment of gently used and never-worn designer labels, including Burberry, Charlie Rocket, Deux Par Deux, Mini Boden, Ralph Lauren and Tea Collection.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 23, 2013 | By Steven Zeitchik
For those who've seen the buzziest of buzzy holiday movies, Spike Jonze's “Her,” you probably left the theater with much to think about. One of the biggest questions, at least from a filmmaking standpoint: How did Jonze and his team arrive at the future we see on the screen? Infinitely relatable though gently different, the Los Angeles of Jonze's unspecified future occupies a new and exciting place in cinematic history--and the history, as it where, of futurism itself. “Her's” L.A.” is a million miles from “Blade Runner,” but it also not entirely a utopia.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 7, 1997 | MYRNA OLIVER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
June Van Dyke, producer of fashion shows and a wardrobe coordinator who was a longtime assistant to costume designer Edith Head, has died. She was 69. Van Dyke died Friday in her Los Angeles home of respiratory complications. For many years, Van Dyke managed the Cinema Glamour Shop, which sells movie and television stars' donated clothing and costumes to benefit the Motion Picture and Television Fund. She also was a tireless worker with the Screen Smart Set Auxiliary of the fund.
MAGAZINE
July 28, 1991
Thank you, Harry Shearer. At last, the Empress has clothes! MATTHEW TRULIO Castaic
NEWS
December 20, 2012 | By Randee Dawn
Actors and costume designers have a rare relationship on set: They're both involved in building a person, using the actor's body as the raw materials. It's a relationship built on trust and talent, and when everything goes well, clothes really do make the man (or woman). Here's a peek behind the scenes of four such recent partnerships. 'Hitchcock' Toni Collette (as Peggy Robertson) Julie Weiss (costume designer) The character: As Alfred Hitchcock'sreal-life assistant, Collette's outfits had to establish her as a mid-century working woman but never be too flashy, since Peggy always stood in the reflected glow of the master of suspense.
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