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September 14, 2012 | By Susan Carpenter
It's the rare 8-year-old who's lucky enough to have a closet stuffed with Dolce & Gabbana, but living large while growing up has its drawbacks: What's a mom to do with all the outgrown Armani button-downs? That's the situation CeCe Hendriks found herself in when she decided to launch Spoiled! , an online consignment boutique for designer children's clothes. Opened this week, predominately with castoffs from her son Jordan's closet, Spoiled! will be updated every Thursday with items from Gucci, True Religion, Louis Vuitton and other designers -- most of it priced at less than $200.
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September 11, 2011 | By Heather John, Special to the Los Angeles Times
The city of Los Angeles estimates that cloth makes up about 10% of local landfills, either from discarded clothes or remnants from garment manufacturing. In addition, it takes a lot of chemicals to produce fabric. At the rate kids grow into and out of their clothes, parents might want to consider shopping at resale stores. Here is a guide to some local offerings. Blue Bird 652 Larchmont Blvd., Los Angeles, (323) 466-0408 This is one of the city's best upscale consignment shops for kids, with a large assortment of gently used and never-worn designer labels, including Burberry, Charlie Rocket, Deux Par Deux, Mini Boden, Ralph Lauren and Tea Collection.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 28, 1994
Let me see if I have this right. La Habra plans to ban clotheslines because the City Council considers clean, sweet-smelling clothes to be a "blight." Yet La Habra is doing nothing to address the blight of traffic and air pollution. Maybe people are supposed to wear dirty clothes so that everything matches--the clothes, the cars, the air. Perhaps there is even a City Council term for this, such as coordinated-aesthetics-of-the-external-environment. I must admit it makes a California kind of sense.
NEWS
December 20, 1992
"Clothes and the Aging Body" really hit the mark. Kudos to the Arizona women doing the research. Their statistics certainly describe me and my problems. I still lead an active life at 72 and have great difficulty finding well-fitting clothes that are appropriate regardless of price--especially tennis items. Thanks for printing this, and hopefully more manufacturers will respond. JOYE TATZ Rancho Mirage
NEWS
April 15, 1993
In high school, awareness grows quickly of the lifetime benefits--and drawbacks--of one's sex. Rare is the student who has not at least considered switching sexes, if only for a day. High Life asks: "Have you ever wished you were the opposite sex? Why or why not?" "Yes, because it only takes boys two minutes to get ready for wherever they want to go." Stacey Clements, 16, junior, Santa Margarita "Yes.
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June 19, 2011 | By Susan Carpenter, Los Angeles Times
COTTON Prized for: Soft feel and easy maintenance; wide availability Percentage of clothes sold in the U.S. that incorporate cotton: Almost 75% Primary sources: China, India, U.S. FLAX Prized for: Color and performance traits similar to cotton; plants require no irrigation and fewer chemical fertilizers and pesticides than cotton Percentage of clothes sold in the U.S. that incorporate flax: 1.1% Primary sources:...
NEWS
September 19, 1986 | MANDY BEHBEHANI
Four years ago, 28-year-old New York designer Rebecca Moses was bankrupt. This year, she estimates her sportswear collection will do $16 million in retail sales. In the intervening time, she found herself a financial backer--partner Victor Coopersmith--and cut her prices in half. Painful Experience "When I started my own ready-to-wear business in 1981, I didn't have backing," says Moses, at Neiman-Marcus in Beverly Hills recently to show her fall collection.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 27, 1987
Our readers wrote letters throughout 198 7 expressing their viewpoints on a variety of issues. Here are condensed versions of some of those letters. We appreciate their taking the time to share their viewpoints and look forward to hearing from you in 1988. If I should go to the Performing Arts Center and see Robert Peters and others wearing "paint-smeared coveralls, ravaged blue jeans and soiled shirts" I will know that I am not looking at people who are "showing off."
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