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NEWS
June 18, 1985 | DENNIS McLELLAN, Times Staff Writer
Preliminary results of an ongoing study of the possible toxic effects of smoking clove cigarettes show that eugenol--the major component of cloves--can be lethal to animals when administered directly into the lung, The Times has learned. The independent study by the American Health Foundation in Valhalla, N.Y., provides the first scientific report that links eugenol with observations by physicians on the toxicity of the faddish, pungent-smelling imported cigarettes from Indonesia.
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NEWS
March 21, 1998 | MAGGIE FARLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
From his sprawling stone house atop a hill near Java's southern coast, Parmin, a farmer, can see the neglected green brambles of his clove trees half a mile away. The groves are untended and wild, the boughs of his spice trees laden with unharvested cloves. Since the president's son took control of the industry eight years ago, Parmin's clove harvest has brought him less than what he paid his workers to pick the buds. Finally, he gave up.
NEWS
December 26, 1985 | DENNIS McLELLAN
View has revisited some of the people and places it reported on in the last several months. Among them: --Hollywood's Masquers Club, which because of declining funds sold its building and moved. --Jimmy and Ricky Sperry, blinded in an accident 11 years ago, who received cornea transplants in August. --Balu Natarajan, who triumphed over 167 other youngsters to win the National Spelling Bee in June.
WORLD
November 24, 2005 | Edmund Sanders, Times Staff Writer
It's springtime on this green, hilly island, and the pungent, sweet smell of cloves spices the air. Zaharan Salim's father, who crossed the turquoise water from Oman to settle here nearly 100 years ago, taught him as a boy that the annual bouquet signaled harvest time. His father planted a small grove of clove trees to support the family, and Salim expanded the plantation into one of Pemba's largest, with more than 2,000 of the tall evergreens sprouting from the fertile soil.
BUSINESS
July 3, 2000 | RODRIQUE NGOWI, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Intensely fragrant and flavored, cloves were the riches that drew the dhows and clippers of the colonial era to Zanzibar, giving the tiny Indian Ocean archipelago economic influence and resonance far beyond its size. Once upon a time, the wizened, never-opened buds of the stunted evergreens were worth more than their weight in gold. European powers went to war over them in the 17th century; Zanzibari rulers made smuggling them punishable by death.
FOOD
April 14, 2010
Green cilantro sauce (mojo verde) Total time: 10 minutes Servings: Makes a generous half cup of sauce 2 cloves garlic 1 jalapeƱo pepper, or to taste 1/2 teaspoon ground cumin 1 teaspoon oregano 2 tablespoons chopped parsley 1/2 cup loosely packed cilantro leaves 3 tablespoons olive oil 3 tablespoons wine vinegar 1/2 teaspoon salt 1/4 cup water Place all ingredients in a blender container...
FOOD
January 9, 1986 | ROSE DOSTI, Times Staff Writer
Dear SOS: I'm crazy about the fajitas served at the El Torito restaurant chain. Is there a chance for the recipe? READER Dear Reader: El Torito complied with two recipes--one using beef and the other chicken, and good recipes they are, too. Chicken fajitas are basted with achiote sauce, made with achiote powder, which can be found at any Mexican grocery store or Mexican products counter of supermarkets.
FOOD
September 14, 2005 | Charles Perry, Times Staff Writer
ONCE upon a time, I entered a couple of small-time chili contests. Then, because I am a good-natured patsy, I agreed to judge a couple of contests. I learned to regret this. Take it from me, the heartbreak of losing a chili contest is nothing compared with the heartburn of being a chili judge. (Well, not literal heartburn, though there's enough of that.
FOOD
February 21, 1991 | ABBY MANDEL
Stir-frying, which originated in China, is one of the best techniques for producing dinner in a matter of minutes. The following stir-fry dishes are nutritious, colorful, appealing and often less pricey than a conventional meal of meat, vegetables and potatoes. The trick for really quick cooking is to have the ingredients--vegetables and meat--all cut to size and ready to go so that when you come home at the end of a day, you can go right to the stove.
FOOD
February 24, 1994 | RUSS PARSONS, TIMES FOOD MANAGING EDITOR
Almost every recipe in every cookbook you've ever read says you must soak dried beans before you cook them. In almost every case that advice is wrong. Letting dried beans sit overnight in a bowl of cold water does nothing to improve their flavor or their texture. In fact, it does quite the opposite. While soaking shortens the unattended cooking time of beans somewhat, the time saved is marginal and there are no other labor-saving benefits.
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