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Cloves

NEWS
March 21, 1998 | MAGGIE FARLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
From his sprawling stone house atop a hill near Java's southern coast, Parmin, a farmer, can see the neglected green brambles of his clove trees half a mile away. The groves are untended and wild, the boughs of his spice trees laden with unharvested cloves. Since the president's son took control of the industry eight years ago, Parmin's clove harvest has brought him less than what he paid his workers to pick the buds. Finally, he gave up.
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NEWS
December 26, 1985 | DENNIS McLELLAN
View has revisited some of the people and places it reported on in the last several months. Among them: --Hollywood's Masquers Club, which because of declining funds sold its building and moved. --Jimmy and Ricky Sperry, blinded in an accident 11 years ago, who received cornea transplants in August. --Balu Natarajan, who triumphed over 167 other youngsters to win the National Spelling Bee in June.
WORLD
November 24, 2005 | Edmund Sanders, Times Staff Writer
It's springtime on this green, hilly island, and the pungent, sweet smell of cloves spices the air. Zaharan Salim's father, who crossed the turquoise water from Oman to settle here nearly 100 years ago, taught him as a boy that the annual bouquet signaled harvest time. His father planted a small grove of clove trees to support the family, and Salim expanded the plantation into one of Pemba's largest, with more than 2,000 of the tall evergreens sprouting from the fertile soil.
BUSINESS
July 3, 2000 | RODRIQUE NGOWI, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Intensely fragrant and flavored, cloves were the riches that drew the dhows and clippers of the colonial era to Zanzibar, giving the tiny Indian Ocean archipelago economic influence and resonance far beyond its size. Once upon a time, the wizened, never-opened buds of the stunted evergreens were worth more than their weight in gold. European powers went to war over them in the 17th century; Zanzibari rulers made smuggling them punishable by death.
FOOD
July 25, 1996 | ROSE DOSTI
DEAR SOS: I would love to have the recipe from Pizza Place in San Gabriel for their chicken tequila fettuccine. Can you help? --DARIA DEAR DARIA: What a nice dish to try, using shrimp, lobster, scallops or leftover turkey, as well as chicken.
FOOD
March 3, 2011 | By Noelle Carter, Los Angeles Times
  Dear Culinary SOS: On our trip to the Russian River earlier this month, we had a lot of amazing food. The dish we can't get out of our heads is the Brussels sprouts at boon eat + drink in Guerneville. Everyone in town sent us in to the restaurant to try these out, and now we know why. We still can't get over the incredible flavor and texture; they were outrageous. Please help us get the recipe for this. It would be perfect for holiday meals. Rebecca Sommer Pasadena Dear Rebecca: Delicately crisp on the outside and tender on the inside, boon's Brussels sprouts are served warm, tossed in a simple dressing with bright notes of lemon and just a touch of heat from red chile flakes.
FOOD
April 14, 2010
Green cilantro sauce (mojo verde) Total time: 10 minutes Servings: Makes a generous half cup of sauce 2 cloves garlic 1 jalapeño pepper, or to taste 1/2 teaspoon ground cumin 1 teaspoon oregano 2 tablespoons chopped parsley 1/2 cup loosely packed cilantro leaves 3 tablespoons olive oil 3 tablespoons wine vinegar 1/2 teaspoon salt 1/4 cup water Place all ingredients in a blender container...
FOOD
March 16, 2005 | Regina Schrambling, Special to The Times
Lately you can't pick up a food magazine without coming across another ode to bacon, which really is one of the most seductive ingredients ever cured. But there's more to the story than the American way of frying. Now that detente has been declared with Old Europe, it's safe to say one thing for the French: They do bacon right. Rather than restricting themselves to crisp strips or crumbled bits in sandwiches or salads, the cheese-eating freedom fryers know the best bites are actually chunks.
FOOD
November 30, 2005 | Barbara Hansen, Times Staff Writer
A great tortilla soup can be a revelation -- rich with an intriguing roasted-corn flavor, vibrant with color and toasty, tantalizing aromas. Classic tortilla soup, the way you'd find it in Mexico City, is simply good chicken broth combined with roasted tomatoes, onion, garlic, chiles and tortillas, cut into strips and fried. It's wonderfully satisfying, "a sort of soul food soup," as Mexican cooking authority Diana Kennedy puts it.
FOOD
May 1, 2002 | BARBARA HANSEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
This is a tale of two Oaxacas--one deep in southern Mexico, the other in Los Angeles. The relationship between the two is so close that the Spanish-language newspaper El Oaxaqueno, which is published from offices on Wilshire Boulevard, is distributed in Mexico too. You can buy it for three pesos at the newsstand in the town square in Oaxaca city. The bond works both ways. An April issue devoted a page to photographs of the zocalo, the cathedral and other sites in Oaxaca city.
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