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Cloves

NEWS
March 21, 1998 | MAGGIE FARLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
From his sprawling stone house atop a hill near Java's southern coast, Parmin, a farmer, can see the neglected green brambles of his clove trees half a mile away. The groves are untended and wild, the boughs of his spice trees laden with unharvested cloves. Since the president's son took control of the industry eight years ago, Parmin's clove harvest has brought him less than what he paid his workers to pick the buds. Finally, he gave up.
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NEWS
December 26, 1985 | DENNIS McLELLAN
View has revisited some of the people and places it reported on in the last several months. Among them: --Hollywood's Masquers Club, which because of declining funds sold its building and moved. --Jimmy and Ricky Sperry, blinded in an accident 11 years ago, who received cornea transplants in August. --Balu Natarajan, who triumphed over 167 other youngsters to win the National Spelling Bee in June.
WORLD
November 24, 2005 | Edmund Sanders, Times Staff Writer
It's springtime on this green, hilly island, and the pungent, sweet smell of cloves spices the air. Zaharan Salim's father, who crossed the turquoise water from Oman to settle here nearly 100 years ago, taught him as a boy that the annual bouquet signaled harvest time. His father planted a small grove of clove trees to support the family, and Salim expanded the plantation into one of Pemba's largest, with more than 2,000 of the tall evergreens sprouting from the fertile soil.
BUSINESS
July 3, 2000 | RODRIQUE NGOWI, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Intensely fragrant and flavored, cloves were the riches that drew the dhows and clippers of the colonial era to Zanzibar, giving the tiny Indian Ocean archipelago economic influence and resonance far beyond its size. Once upon a time, the wizened, never-opened buds of the stunted evergreens were worth more than their weight in gold. European powers went to war over them in the 17th century; Zanzibari rulers made smuggling them punishable by death.
FOOD
December 15, 2004 | Regina Schrambling, Special to The Times
My Christmas fantasy always involves dispensing with gifts, stopping the music and replanting all those doomed trees. But there's no way I would pass up baking cookies with ginger, doctoring eggnog with brandy or indulging in any of the other tasteful aspects of the holiday. Beyond its more obvious meanings, after all, Christmas is really so much about flavor. At least a dozen fruits, spices and liquors are indelibly associated with it.
FOOD
May 22, 1986 | ISAAC CRONIN and PAUL JOHNSON, Cronin and Johnson are co-authors of "The California Seafood Cookbook."
Crayfish or crawfish, regardless of how you spell this lobster-like crustacean, is enjoyed throughout the United States and the world. There are 300 different species of crayfish found on all the continents except Africa. The smallest is the one-inch dwarf crayfish of America, and the largest is the Tasmanian or Maori crayfish, which may grow to eight pounds. Most of the crayfish sold in the United States is the red swamp crawfish, which is extensively aquacultured in Louisiana.
FOOD
April 14, 2010
Green cilantro sauce (mojo verde) Total time: 10 minutes Servings: Makes a generous half cup of sauce 2 cloves garlic 1 jalapeƱo pepper, or to taste 1/2 teaspoon ground cumin 1 teaspoon oregano 2 tablespoons chopped parsley 1/2 cup loosely packed cilantro leaves 3 tablespoons olive oil 3 tablespoons wine vinegar 1/2 teaspoon salt 1/4 cup water Place all ingredients in a blender container...
FOOD
September 14, 2005 | Charles Perry, Times Staff Writer
ONCE upon a time, I entered a couple of small-time chili contests. Then, because I am a good-natured patsy, I agreed to judge a couple of contests. I learned to regret this. Take it from me, the heartbreak of losing a chili contest is nothing compared with the heartburn of being a chili judge. (Well, not literal heartburn, though there's enough of that.
FOOD
December 20, 1990 | BARBARA HANSEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In this island nation, hot curries are what most Sri Lankans eat throughout the year. But Christmas is different. That's when roast turkey with stuffing and fruit-laden steamed puddings hit the table. These dishes, accompanied by a salad, vegetables and dinner rolls, appear in upper-middle-class homes, whether Christian or not (Sri Lanka is 70% Buddhist). Turkeys are shipped in from the United States, but the pudding is English in origin.
FOOD
January 26, 2012 | By Noelle Carter, Los Angeles Times
Dear SOS: Milk has the best molasses cookies I've ever had. My entire family adores them, and I would love to be able to make them for my dad on his 66th birthday. Please help? These cookies are out of this world. I need the recipe, before I spend my last dime on them! Thank you! Selby Blum Los Angeles Dear Selby: Milk was happy to share its recipe for molasses cookies with us. These are thin and rich, so have a big glass of milk at the ready - it's all but impossible to eat just one. Milk's molasses cookies Total time: 1 hour Servings: 2 dozen cookies Note: Adapted from Milk on Beverly Boulevard.
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