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Coachella Valley Music And Arts Festival

ENTERTAINMENT
December 12, 2005 | Geoff Boucher
In early 1999, the Coachella Valley Music & Arts Festival was just a dream set in the desert -- a dream that was doubted by many in the music industry. Promoter Paul Tollett's task then was to persuade others to share his belief in creating a massive, annual music festival that would be set in oven-baked Indio and geared to satisfy discerning music fans. The first year he lost money; the second year, he almost lost his house.
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 3, 2005 | Steve Appleford, Special to The Times
"Did everyone see a show today you're going to remember the rest of your lives?" That wasn't an unfair question from indie-rapper Aesop Rock, addressing a Sunday night crowd at the Coachella Valley Music and Arts Festival. He wasn't performing on the main stage, but the New Yorker clearly understood it's not headliners alone that make the annual festival in the desert a worthwhile destination for connoisseurs of rock, hip-hop and dance music.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 2, 2005 | Robert Hilburn, Times Staff Writer
Think of the Coachella Valley Music and Arts Festival as the rock 'n' roll equivalent of TiVo. It's a way of seeing your favorite acts and exerting control over the clock.
NEWS
April 28, 2005 | Geoff Boucher, Times Staff Writer
There is hot. Then there is hot. And then there was the Coachella Valley Music and Arts Festival in 2001. It was 105 degrees in Indio, but, according to our instruments, it felt about 1,005. This year the desert festival looks mighty cool, with 90-plus acts -- veterans like Coldplay and Nine Inch Nails, newcomers like Bright Eyes and the Arcade Fire -- and temperatures in the 80s. There are other winds of change: People looking for their cars may actually find them.
NEWS
April 28, 2005 | Geoff Boucher, Times Staff Writer
The Coachella Valley Music and Arts Festival is held on the lush expanse of the Empire Polo Field, but it's no walk in the park. Some tips for surviving: The jam Indio is not a big town. Coachella draws a lot of people, and they usually arrive in cars. No matter how you add up those factors, the result is traffic snarls. This year the promoters and venue worked with local officials to find some relief.
NEWS
April 29, 2004 | Richard Cromelin
The thing to remember about Coachella is that during the course of the two days, some folks you've never heard of might suddenly become your favorite band. But before the first notes are struck, let's propose an honor roll of the weekend's key acts, a select gang of five: Radiohead's only scheduled U.S. appearance this year is the obvious pinnacle, a meeting of band-of-the-moment with rock's prestige event.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 9, 2004 | Geoff Boucher
After weeks of Internet postings of fan predictions, wish lists and more than a few bizarre rumors (our favorite: Lynyrd Skynyrd will be playing there), the organizers of the Coachella Valley Music and Arts Festival have finally announced their 2004 lineup and the tickets will go on sale Saturday. Yes, it includes a Pixies reunion on the first night of the May 1-2 show, and, yes, the much-revered Radiohead and Wilco will both play the same night.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 14, 2004 | Richard Cromelin
English rock band Radiohead, German electronic pioneers Kraftwerk and the reunited post-punk heroes the Pixies will be the key attractions on the first night of the fifth Coachella Valley Music and Arts Festival, which will be held at the Empire Polo Field in Indio on May 1 and 2. The remaining lineup will be announced before tickets go on sale in early February.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 29, 2002 | GEOFF BOUCHER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was just one among dozens of singular musical moments at the third Coachella Valley Music and Arts Festival, but the frenzied Saturday night set by a turntable wizard named Z-Trip seemed to encapsulate the defining ambitions of this massive music gathering in the desert. Weaving, grafting and scratching, Z-Trip created a vinyl collage of disparate music (Who would expect Michael Jackson's "Billie Jean" and Rage Against the Machine's "Testify" to lend themselves to merger?
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