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Coachella Valley Water District

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MAGAZINE
October 2, 1988
I greatly enjoyed "Bono of the Desert," by Alice Kahn (Aug. 7)--with one exception. Kahn mentioned that Coachella Valley water is pumped from wells replenished periodically from the Colorado River "courtesy" of the Metropolitan Water District of Southern California. Metropolitan and the Coachella Valley Water District have a unique contractual arrangement whereby Metropolitan is exchanging Colorado River water for water from Northern California that Coachella has entitlements to. The water is exchanged gallon for gallon because it is physically easier for Metropolitan to obtain Northern California water and deliver Colorado River water to Coachella via the Colorado River Aqueduct.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 12, 2013 | By Jean Merl
Facing a possible lawsuit over the way it chooses its directors, the board of the Coachella Valley Water District voted Tuesday to drop its at-large elections system. From now on, directors will be elected by geographic district.  The change comes less than a month after attorneys warned  in a letter that  the jurisdiction's at-large elections were likely in violation of the California Voting Rights Act. "The letter raised some serious issues that warranted a thorough evaluation," board President John Powell Jr. said in a statement issued after Tuesday's vote.  "I don't want any of the district's constituents to feel like they aren't fairly represented, so I wholeheartedly support the change," Powell added.
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TRAVEL
July 30, 1989
There appears to be a misconception on the part of some of your readers regarding water usage in the California desert. Some desert residents are not water wasters. We can't afford to be. You see, we have a drought every year. If Angelinos were to enact the day-in and day-out conservation measures we desert dwellers do, water would never be a problem, even in the leanest years. It's funny. Los Angeles and its residents have been stealing water from all over California for years.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 21, 2013 | By Jean Merl
Opening a new front on efforts to improve minority representation on local elected boards,  attorneys  representing several Latino citizens have accused the Coachella Valley Water District of violating the California Voting Rights Act. In a letter delivered Monday to John Powell, the district's board president, lawyers Robert Rubin and Megan Beaman said the district's  at-large election system "dilutes the ability of Latino constituents to...
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 21, 2013 | By Jean Merl
Opening a new front on efforts to improve minority representation on local elected boards,  attorneys  representing several Latino citizens have accused the Coachella Valley Water District of violating the California Voting Rights Act. In a letter delivered Monday to John Powell, the district's board president, lawyers Robert Rubin and Megan Beaman said the district's  at-large election system "dilutes the ability of Latino constituents to...
NEWS
March 27, 1999 | TONY PERRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Interior Secretary Bruce Babbitt has decided to resume attempts to mediate a bitter dispute between the Metropolitan Water District of Southern California and two agricultural irrigation districts, water officials said Friday. The conflict is seen by many as a threat to the state's water future.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 13, 1989
There is an unexpected and unfortunate hitch in the water-exchange agreement between the Imperial Irrigation District and the Metropolitan Water District of Southern California that could have a major effect on the future of such trades involving Colorado River water.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 13, 1989 | DAVID G. SAVAGE, Times Staff Writer
A legal fight over Colorado River water ended in a 4-4 deadlock at the Supreme Court on Monday, leaving intact a controversial, 11-year-old order from the U.S. Department of the Interior that resulted in increased allocations of water to three Indian reservations along the river. The states of Arizona and California had been joined by the Metropolitan Water District of Southern California and the Coachella Valley Water District in California in opposing the extra allocations to the reservations.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 1, 1988
Congress has an opportunity to ease considerably the potential for future water shortages in Southern California, and at no cost to the federal government. The Metropolitan Water District of Southern California has offered to pay the full cost of lining 68 miles of the All-American and Coachella canals in Imperial and Riverside counties in exchange for the water that would be conserved--an estimated 100,000 acre-feet a year, enough to supply the residential needs of 800,000 people.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 22, 2013 | By Jean Merl
On the heels of a letter accusing it of violating the California Voting Rights Act, the board of the Coachella Valley Water District on Tuesday took a tentative step toward changing its election system, a spokeswoman said. Advised  by its attorney that changes to the way it elects its directors may require voter approval, the board discussed the possibility of putting a measure before voters in the June 2014 California primary, according to district spokeswoman Heather Engle. The board will take up the possible election matter at its Nov. 12 meeting, Engel said.
NEWS
August 5, 1999 | TONY PERRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Setting aside years of acrimony and accusations, negotiators for Southern California's warring water agencies reached an agreement early Wednesday designed to ensure that the state will have enough water to meet soaring future needs. "We have reached closure on all core issues," said David Hayes, acting deputy secretary of the U.S. Department of the Interior. "We're very excited."
NEWS
April 6, 1999 | TONY PERRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As water cascades from sprinklers onto a field of red potatoes, farm manager Bartt Ries explains Imperial Valley's irrigation policy. "We flood, we furrow, we drip, we sprinkle," said Ries, who manages the fields for Vessey & Co. of El Centro, which has 6,000 acres under cultivation. "We do anything we need to. Water is the only advantage we have here." But what Ries sees as an advantage, some see as an outrage.
NEWS
March 27, 1999 | TONY PERRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Interior Secretary Bruce Babbitt has decided to resume attempts to mediate a bitter dispute between the Metropolitan Water District of Southern California and two agricultural irrigation districts, water officials said Friday. The conflict is seen by many as a threat to the state's water future.
NEWS
February 16, 1999 | TONY PERRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The governing board of the Metropolitan Water District of Southern California took time last week to search for the appropriate term to describe the ruckus it has kicked up recently in the water world. "It's fairly obvious to me that we're in battle--full battle," said Jorge G. Castro, who represents the Central Basin Municipal Water District. "I wouldn't characterize it as starting a war," said Bill Luddy, who represents Los Angeles.
NEWS
December 18, 1998 | TONY PERRY and FRANK CLIFFORD, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
It was a day of good news and bad news for California as Interior Secretary Bruce Babbitt on Thursday assessed his attempts to end California's seemingly endless water wars in a speech to 1,000-plus water officials from seven states that depend on the Colorado River for survival.
NEWS
September 30, 1998 | TONY PERRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
John R. Wodraska, general manager of the Metropolitan Water District of Southern California during five years of nearly continuous tumult in the water industry, announced Tuesday that he is leaving to take a job with a new international water company. Wodraska, 50, will become managing director of North American operations at Azurix, a water projects subsidiary of Enron, a worldwide natural gas and electricity company based in Houston.
NEWS
September 30, 1998 | TONY PERRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
John R. Wodraska, general manager of the Metropolitan Water District of Southern California during five years of nearly continuous tumult in the water industry, announced Tuesday that he is leaving to take a job with a new international water company. Wodraska, 50, will become managing director of North American operations at Azurix, a water projects subsidiary of Enron, a worldwide natural gas and electricity company based in Houston.
NEWS
September 12, 1998 | TERRY McDERMOTT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Secretary of the Interior Bruce Babbitt threatened Friday an unprecedented direct federal intervention in Southern California's water wars if the various combatants can't agree on their own. Obviously irked, Babbitt in a telephone interview described California water planning as being "in disarray." He said there would be "a very bleak future for California and the Colorado River" without some regional consensus. Babbitt's office has been trying to mediate discussions in Washington, D.C.
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