Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsCoachella
IN THE NEWS

Coachella

ENTERTAINMENT
April 14, 2014 | By Mikael Wood
Because she was on the West Coast, Lana Del Rey said, she thought it made sense to unveil her new single midway through her performance Sunday night at the Coachella Valley Music and Arts Festival. Titled, um, " West Coast ," it's a characteristically bleary number that sounds like Stevie Nicks' "Edge of Seventeen" slowed down to a narcotized crawl; there's a bit of "Wicked Game" by Chris Isaak in there too, as, indeed, there is in all of Del Rey's music. But Coachella's location wasn't its only appeal to the singer.
Advertisement
ENTERTAINMENT
April 13, 2014 | By August Brown
There was a huge, heaving mass of Coachella fans listening to time-shifting, hard-riffing music with an apocalyptic sci-fi bent last night. But they weren't watching the headliner Muse. While a trickle of committed fans progged out with the English hard rock trio, all the action was deep in the Sahara tent last night, where the 26-year-old Sonny Moore led a beyond-capacity crowd in a reverie of the restless, insistent party music he makes as Skrillex. The producer is one of the kingpins of the American EDM wave, riding a tide of harsh bass music to the headliner slot of almost ever major electronic music fest in the U.S. But after the surprise release of his new album "Recess," which touches on deep reggae, K-pop and a thousand other influences, his Coachella set cemented just how much bigger his project is. PHOTOS: Coachella Day 1 | Day 2 Moore took the stage in an update of his spaceship stage motif, where he appears to be performing in the cockpit of some junked "Star Wars" fighter plane.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 13, 2014 | By Gerrick D. Kennedy
Nas, Jay Z and Diddy hit the stage together at Coachella to celebrate a landmark hip-hop album. Twenty years ago Nas, a hungry 20-year-old emcee from New York's tough Queensbridge projects, issued his debut, “Illmatic.” The album, with its stark coming-of-age narrative on the pits of inner-city life in a drug-fueled, poverty-stricken housing project, set a new benchmark for hip-hop. LIVE UPDATES: The Coachella scene Nas feted the game-changing album - it officially hits the milestone a week later - during his late night set on the Outdoor stage.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 13, 2014 | By Randall Roberts, Los Angeles Times Pop Music Critic
It's a perennial theme, one that manifests itself throughout genre and era: the idea of getting lost in music. Whether it's Pharrell imploring us to "Lose Yourself to Dance," Eric B. and Rakim's "Let the Rhythm Hit 'Em" or the old-time standard "The Tennessee Waltz," the notion of vanishing inside the rhythms, of losing all sense of time and space and letting the proverbial troubles glide away, is something that draws many -- but not all -- festival...
ENTERTAINMENT
April 13, 2014 | By August Brown
Some Coachella sets are about finding an audience. Others are about proving just how substantial a rising band's is. The latter is the best scenario to describe the absolute hordes of fans stacked cheek-to-jowl at Chvrches' afternoon Outdoor Stage set. The Scottish electro-pop trio has made big strides since their album "The Bones of What You Believe" last fall. But the turnout at their Coachella set suggested that much bigger things are in store. The band played great, with a mix of self-effacing charm from singer Lauren Mayberry and perfectly calibrated pop bullets from her bandmates and producers.
HOME & GARDEN
April 13, 2014 | By Jenn Harris
The event: H&M threw its second annual H&M Loves Music party on Saturday during the Coachella Valley Music and Arts Festival. Party co-host Alexander Wang also announced his new collaboration with the Swedish brand. The collection will be revealed Nov. 6.  The party started around 11 p.m., giving festival-goers time to finish seeing the night's performances and make their way over to the Indio Performing Arts Center.   The scene: The space looked like a mini-Coachella stage with pulsing neon lights, more than 700 swaying bodies and a surprise performance by Major Lazer.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 12, 2014 | By Randall Roberts
Juxtapositions abounded on the first day of Coachella, reinforcing the idea of a pop culture splintered but joyously so. Competing narratives ruled the day, the most striking of which early on involved a New York versus Los Angeles battle between the self-described "Trap Lord," ASAP Ferg, and the spirited Los Angeles pop/rock band Grouplove. The former, Ferg, is part of New York's ASAP crew. He appeared masked on the outdoor stage, with half a dozen veiled compadres offering big crawling beats and sibilant high hats.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 12, 2014 | By Gerrick D. Kennedy
Opening day of the Coachella Valley Music and Arts Festival is history, so all of those second-weekend pass holders know what to expect -- and can plan accordingly.   With acts like Muse, Skrillex, MGMT, Lorde and Pharrell Williams among some of Saturday's can't-miss sets, here are five things we learned from Day One. 1. OutKast has a lot of work to do. Massive expectations aside, the long-awaited reunion of hip-hop's most beloved duo fell short Friday. It's understandable that the first show after a several-year hiatus would have some kinks, especially in a festival setting when stage turnaround is lightning speed compared with an arena tour.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 12, 2014 | By Randall Roberts, Los Angeles Times Pop Music Critic
The buildup lasted much of Outkast's oft-riveting Coachella performance on Friday night, rolling toward those set-ending classics and album tracks that defined the early '00s: "So Fresh, So Clean," "Ms. Jackson" and "Hey Ya!"  Triumphantly returning to celebrate 20 years as a team, Antwan "Big Boi" Patton and Andre "3000" Benjamin presented repeated arguments as to why they'd earned such a huge Southern California welcome for their first shows since the Atlanta duo went on hiatus in 2007.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 12, 2014 | By August Brown
Coachella is for earnest young things. But every old misanthrope in Indio this weekend found their way to Mojave Tent on Friday for the Afghan Whigs. Greg Dulli, the singer for the recently re-activated indie combo, led his band in one of the day's more scalding rock sets. They dug into loud and lecherous tunes like "Somethin' Hot" with the hormones of onetime collaborator Usher, but the bile of a 90's rocker jaded to the hilt. While the rave tents were full of flexing bros and tweens dressed as forest sprites, Dulli's crowd was overwhelmingly wizened old cads, and nodded in quiet approval as he played harsh yet resonant bar ballads from his band's comeback album for Sub Pop, "Do To The Beast.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|