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OPINION
May 1, 2013
Re "Ranchers drawing a line in the coal," April 27 With ranchers in southern Montana possibly having their land divided by rail lines to deliver coal to Asia - disrupting their cattle operations and polluting their water - it does seem that the 1% may win again. Mining and shipping coal to Asia to make cheap products to sell back to U.S. residents seems problematic, with all that carbon dioxide spewing from unregulated plants that seek only bigger profits. Traditions and property that go back more than 100 years for ranching families may literally be thrown under the wheels.
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BUSINESS
March 28, 2014 | By Neela Banerjee
WASHINGTON - In an effort to deliver on President Obama's pledge last summer to tackle emissions that drive climate change, the White House announced a strategy to limit releases of methane, a highly potent greenhouse gas. The methane strategy, disclosed Friday, is the most recent in a string of climate change initiatives that the White House has unveiled at a rapid pace in recent weeks. It lays the groundwork for regulations that could affect agriculture and the oil, gas and coal industries.
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NATIONAL
March 16, 2014 | By David Zucchino
MONCURE, N.C. - While poring over regulatory documents for Duke Energy coal ash ponds, environmentalists at the Waterkeeper Alliance grew suspicious of the way the giant utility was handling the toxic ash waste left over from burning coal. They decided to send up a team in an aircraft to photograph Duke's shuttered Cape Fear coal-burning power plant and ash ponds, tucked into piney woods in this tiny community in central North Carolina. The photos revealed what the Waterkeeper Alliance says is evidence that Duke, the nation's largest electric utility, is deliberately pumping toxic coal ash wastewater from the containment ponds into a canal that eventually feeds into the Cape Fear River, a source of drinking water for downstream cities.
NATIONAL
March 16, 2014 | By David Zucchino
MONCURE, N.C. - While poring over regulatory documents for Duke Energy coal ash ponds, environmentalists at the Waterkeeper Alliance grew suspicious of the way the giant utility was handling the toxic ash waste left over from burning coal. They decided to send up a team in an aircraft to photograph Duke's shuttered Cape Fear coal-burning power plant and ash ponds, tucked into piney woods in this tiny community in central North Carolina. The photos revealed what the Waterkeeper Alliance says is evidence that Duke, the nation's largest electric utility, is deliberately pumping toxic coal ash wastewater from the containment ponds into a canal that eventually feeds into the Cape Fear River, a source of drinking water for downstream cities.
NATIONAL
May 1, 2010 | Tom Hamburger, Tribune Washington Bureau
The Justice Department has launched a criminal investigation into the explosion at Massey Energy Co.'s Upper Big Branch mine in West Virginia, law enforcement sources said Friday. The case originated in the U.S. attorney's office in the Southern District of West Virginia, which has prosecuted the coal company for criminal violations of safety standards in the past. A spokesman for that office referred questions to the Justice Department's press office in Washington, which declined to comment.
OPINION
April 20, 2010 | Scott Martelle
Watching the events unfold around Massey Energy Co.'s Upper Big Branch coal mine the last few weeks created an uneasy sense of deja vu. And it had less to do with 29 miners' bodies below ground than with power plays and corporate hubris above it. The deadly West Virginia mine explosion came four days after the 100th anniversary of the start of a lengthy Colorado coal strike that eventually led to open guerrilla warfare between miners and the...
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 11, 2011 | David Zahniser
Los Angeles Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa drew cheers from environmentalists just over two months ago when he issued a new political promise: eliminating coal from the Department of Water and Power's fuel mix by 2020. Instead of waiting a decade to see if that promise comes true, a Sacramento-based advocacy group decided to stage a publicity campaign thanking the mayor. It bought advertising space on city bus kiosks showing a smiling picture of Villaraigosa and the word "Successful."
BUSINESS
February 27, 2009 | Marla Dickerson
Academy Award winners Joel and Ethan Coen, known for their grimly comic portrayals of human nature, are poking fun at a new target: the coal industry. The filmmaking brothers have directed a TV spot for an environmental coalition that's trying to demolish the notion that there's anything clean about so-called clean coal.
SCIENCE
August 28, 2013 | By Geoffrey Mohan
Mercury found in high levels in deep Pacific Ocean fish such as swordfish has a chemical fingerprint, and it implicates coal-burning power plants in Asia, according to a new study. A research team from the universities of Hawaii and Michigan looked at mercury in the flesh of nine species common to the massive North Pacific Subtropical Gyre, the largest ecosystem on the planet, at 7 million square miles. Four years ago, the team found that mercury levels in such fish as tuna increased with the depth of the fish's habitat.
HEALTH
December 26, 2013 | By Melissa Rohlin
Mike D'Antoni is still reeling from his foot-in-the-mouth moment the other day. After the Lakers' 117-90 loss to the Phoenix Suns on Monday, D'Antoni made a comment that he immediately regretted. "Find another team to root for," he said of Lakers fans who are becoming discouraged with the team this season.  Oops. He apologized Tuesday. "I was an idiot last night," he said. "I was out of my mind. I was ticked off. We didn't play well and I said some stuff I shouldn't have.
NATIONAL
March 16, 2014 | By Neela Banerjee
DE KALB, Miss. - Looming like a spaceship over pine and sweet-gum forest, the high-tech power plant under construction in rural Kemper County is a $5-billion wager on an energy future that includes coal. The Kemper plant is scheduled to open this year as the first in the United States to ramp up technology to remove carbon dioxide emissions on a large scale. If it works as planned, up to 65% of the plant's potential carbon dioxide emissions would be removed. But if its progress is any indication, building a coal plant that can sharply reduce greenhouse gas pollution is a white-knuckle ride.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 4, 2014 | By Steven Zeitchik
Golden Bear winner “Black Coal, Thin Ice,” a Sam Rockwell-Marisa Tomei dramedy  and a documentary about the legacy of Christian Dior will debut at the Tribeca Film Festival when it kicks off next month, organizers announced Tuesday. “Black Coal,” Diao Yinan's Mandarin-language film, is a China-set noir about a mysterious set of murders and the defrocked cop who sets out to solve them. The movie, which has just been announced for a  China release slot, won the top prize -- the Golden Bear -- at the Berlin International Film Festival and the Silver Bear for actor Liao Fan. Meanwhile, Tribeca will see the world premiere of “Loitering With intent,” theater-world crossover Adam Rapp's film about screenwriting and family that stars Tomei and Rockwell.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 4, 2014 | By Julie Makinen
BEIJING -- The Chinese Film “Black Coal, Thin Ice,” which took home the Golden Bear at the Berlin Film Festival last month, has cleared censorship and will arrive in mainland theaters March 21. But the question now hanging over director Diao Yinan's noirish tale is: Will anyone go see it? At a press conference last week unveiling new posters for the film, Diao was peppered with questions from Chinese reporters, asking him whether the festival win would brand the movie as “too artistic” and scare off prospective viewers.
NATIONAL
March 3, 2014 | By David Zucchino
FAYETTEVILLE, N.C. - After weeks of downplaying a massive coal ash spill, North Carolina regulators issued violation notices Monday to five more Duke Energy power plants, in addition to two citations late last week at the site that polluted the Dan River a month ago. Also Monday, the state Department of Environment and Natural Resources described the Feb. 2 spill as an “environmental disaster.” The latest five citations focused on Duke...
NATIONAL
February 28, 2014 | By David Zucchino
DURHAM, N.C. -- Nearly a month after a massive coal ash spill at a Duke Energy plant contaminated the Dan River, state regulators in North Carolina announced late Friday that they have cited Duke for violations of environmental laws. The North Carolina Department of Environment and Natural Resources has been accused by environmental groups for failing to take action against Duke Energy and cooperating too closely with the giant utility in dealing with the Feb. 2 spill. In a news release issued at 6 p.m. Friday, the agency said it had issued notices of violation against Duke Energy earlier in the day for its handling of a 27-acre coal ash basin at a retired Duke coal-fired plant on the Dan River near North Carolina's border with Virginia.
NATIONAL
February 25, 2014 | By David Zucchino
DURHAM, N.C. -  North Carolina regulators who have been accused of lax oversight abruptly announced Tuesday that they may force Duke Energy to move its riverfront ash basin to a lined landfill away from waterways after one of its plants leaked tons of toxic coal ash into a major river. That action is precisely what environmentalists have demanded for years while accusing state regulators of allowing coal ash to seep into waterways from Duke's 14 coal-fired plants in the state. Utilities and state regulators have long resisted those demands.
BUSINESS
December 22, 1989 | From Associated Press
The Energy Department said Thursday that it planned to award $540 million to 13 companies to help finance "showcase" ventures in 10 states to develop ways of burning coal with fewer emissions of harmful gases. The proposed awards, which include three California firms, are part of the department's "clean coal technology" program, a $5-billion, five-year effort to make coal-burning power plants less polluting and more efficient.
BUSINESS
March 31, 2006 | From Times Wire Services
Sempra Energy said it abandoned plans to build coal-fired power plants in Nevada and Idaho in the face of strong opposition. Sempra Generation, a subsidiary of the San Diego-based energy company, said it would instead concentrate on storage facilities for liquefied natural gas and pipelines in Mexico, Louisiana and Texas. Sempra Energy also is the parent of Southern California Gas Co. and San Diego Gas & Electric Co.
NATIONAL
February 21, 2014 | By David Zucchino
RALEIGH, N.C. -- A second ruptured stormwater pipe that has been spilling toxic coal ash into the Dan River in North Carolina and Virginia has been sealed,  North Carolina officials announced late Friday. The state's Department of Environment and Natural Resources said Duke Energy, whose coal ash containment basin in Eden, N.C., is the source of the ash, managed to block the discharge with a concrete plug. The 36-inch pipe has been leaking coal ash since since approximately Feb. 14, spilling arsenic and other heavy metals into the river.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 17, 2014 | By Mark Swed, Los Angeles Times Music Critic
Derived from found footage, Bill Morrison's films are odes to snubbed celluloid. Whether he slices the surviving moldy fragments of a lost silent film, as in "Decasia," or crafts a dirge to the 1927 flooding of the Mississippi River with old documentary material, as in the recent "The Great Flood," Morrison savors decayed film stock for its ghostly beauty. Lost worlds are not created or evoked; they are discovered and recovered. What makes Morrison a great filmmaker, though, is not merely his application of restoration hardware but his brilliant exercise of symphonic software.
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