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Coal Canyon

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 5, 2000
Re "Good Investment in Open Space" (Orange County Perspective, Oct. 19): Coal Canyon is a success story that demonstrates a cooperative spirit between public and private interests, between the many government agencies and focused-interest organizations involved in resource protection and enhancement, and between the environmental community and the development industry. I was very pleased to offer my support and help to acquire Coal Canyon as the county's newest open space. My office was fortunate enough to have funds available from the sale of county property in my district to offer $1 million to help in this effort.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 15, 2001
The Mountain Lion Information Center handed out misinformation concerning the Coal Canyon wildlife corridor in its July 9 letter. First of all, no one "created" a wildlife corridor at Coal Canyon. The corridor has been in place for thousands of years. Saving the Coal Canyon property preserves the corridor. When the Riverside Freeway was constructed 40 years ago, deer were blocked from crossing at Coal Canyon. Deer and small creatures do not use the box culverts, although most predators have used them.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 20, 1998
Acre upon acre of orange groves and bean fields has been transformed into tract housing in Orange County in past decades. Efforts to preserve open space and havens for wildlife were spotty. That thankfully is changing. The latest encouraging development was this month's approval by a state panel of spending $6 million toward the purchase of much or all of Coal Canyon, in northern Orange County next to the Riverside Freeway.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 5, 2000
Re "Good Investment in Open Space" (Orange County Perspective, Oct. 19): Coal Canyon is a success story that demonstrates a cooperative spirit between public and private interests, between the many government agencies and focused-interest organizations involved in resource protection and enhancement, and between the environmental community and the development industry. I was very pleased to offer my support and help to acquire Coal Canyon as the county's newest open space. My office was fortunate enough to have funds available from the sale of county property in my district to offer $1 million to help in this effort.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 10, 1994 | DAVID HALDANE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The state Court of Appeal has cleared the way for a housing development on 663 acres next to the Riverside Freeway, despite environmentalists' objections that the project will harm mountain lions and other wildlife. "We're not very happy about it," said Amy Greyson, a lawyer representing the Mountain Lion Foundation and four other environmental groups that filed a lawsuit in 1992 attempting to block the development.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 12, 2000 | DEBORAH SCHOCH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Preservation of the Coal Canyon wilderness, sought for years by environmentalists, appears a certainty with the Friday approval of $4.67 million in state funds to complete the public purchase of the land. Supporters have labeled the canyon "a river of life" because it helps link two large pieces of remaining wilderness amid one of the fastest-growing areas of California.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 8, 1992 | KEVIN JOHNSON
The City Council on Tuesday voted to accept the zoning and specific plans for the 1,500-home Coal Canyon development now opposed by state officials. The council's 4-1 vote, which came without discussion, comes after a recent charge by the state Department of Fish and Game that the city ignored recommendations of the California Environmental Quality Act to protect the canyon's natural resources.
NEWS
December 3, 1998 | FRANK CLIFFORD, TIMES ENVIRONMENTAL WRITER
The Wilson administration announced plans Wednesday to purchase and preserve land that officials and activists alike have long regarded as the most environmentally valuable stretch of unprotected open space in Southern California--Coal Canyon, along the border between Orange and Riverside counties. Buying the canyon, or even a significant part of it, will allow the state to connect the Chino Hills State Park and the Cleveland National Forest.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 8, 2000
Orange County supervisors on Tuesday agreed to spend $1 million to help preserve a portion of Coal Canyon that officials and activists alike have long regarded as the most environmentally valuable stretch of unprotected open space in Southern California. The canyon, near the border between Orange and Riverside counties, links Chino Hills State Park and the Cleveland National Forest.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 5, 1994 | NANCY HSU, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The state Fish and Game Commission on Friday unanimously designated Coal Canyon in Anaheim an ecological reserve, but defied environmentalists by also deciding to allow hunting there. The commission, meeting in Monterey, Calif., also extended the ecological reserve status to the 76-acre Laguna Laurel in Laguna Canyon, as well as to eight other sites throughout the state. No hunting will be allowed in Laguna Laurel, however.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 4, 2000 | DAVID HALDANE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Environmentalists' longtime goal of preserving Coal Canyon as a wilderness area was assured Tuesday when the state closed escrow on the 649-acre parcel near the Riverside Freeway in north Orange County. "We're thrilled," said Warren Westrup, a spokesman for the California Department of Parks and Recreation, which bought the land for $40 million from St. Clair Co. of Newport Beach. "It's been an ongoing project, and it's a significant biological linkage."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 12, 2000 | DEBORAH SCHOCH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Preservation of the Coal Canyon wilderness, sought for years by environmentalists, appears a certainty with the Friday approval of $4.67 million in state funds to complete the public purchase of the land. Supporters have labeled the canyon "a river of life" because it helps link two large pieces of remaining wilderness amid one of the fastest-growing areas of California.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 12, 2000
The preservation of the Coal Canyon wilderness, sought for years by environmentalists, appears a certainty after $4.67 million in state funds was set aside Friday to complete the purchase. Scientists say the 649-acre parcel is a vital link to ensure that wildlife can continue to roam between Chino Hills State Park and the Cleveland National Forest. "This is arguably the most critical biological corridor in California," said state Parks Director Rusty Areias.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 8, 2000
Orange County supervisors on Tuesday agreed to spend $1 million to help preserve a portion of Coal Canyon that officials and activists alike have long regarded as the most environmentally valuable stretch of unprotected open space in Southern California. The canyon, near the border between Orange and Riverside counties, links Chino Hills State Park and the Cleveland National Forest.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 20, 1998
Acre upon acre of orange groves and bean fields has been transformed into tract housing in Orange County in past decades. Efforts to preserve open space and havens for wildlife were spotty. That thankfully is changing. The latest encouraging development was this month's approval by a state panel of spending $6 million toward the purchase of much or all of Coal Canyon, in northern Orange County next to the Riverside Freeway.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 4, 1998 | DEBORAH SCHOCH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Even as a state panel on Thursday approved $6 million toward the purchase of Orange County's Coal Canyon, officials warned that several major hurdles remain before the fragile lifeline of wilderness will be shielded from home construction. Those hoping to preserve the environmentally important canyon must still forge a deal allowing public purchase of the privately held corridor near the border of Orange and Riverside counties. The $6 million in state money, coupled with a possible $6.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 4, 1994 | NANCY HSU, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Appearances can be deceiving. There are no hiking trails or designated camping areas in Coal Canyon. The main entrance right off the Riverside Freeway is gated and locked. But if you're quiet, the residents of this bastion of wildlife can be heard scuttling through the brush. Lizards, snakes and rabbits cross paths while a lone hawk circling the sky emits a cry. Occasionally, a mountain lion can be seen meandering through the canyon on its way to Chino Hills. Then there's the flora.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 20, 1994
The state Fish and Game Commission made an unfortunate choice in keeping the 952 acres it owns in Coal Canyon open to hunters, a decision in stark contrast to its praiseworthy designation of the same property as an ecological reserve. The property is right off the Riverside Freeway, ignored by most people and accessible only through two gates, which are usually locked.
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