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BUSINESS
July 7, 1989 | From Times wire service s
A coal company whose contract with the United Mine Workers includes a no-strike clause has fired 29 wildcat strikers who refused to return to work, the first firings of the four-week wildcat walkout, officials said today. Howard Green, a member of the UMW international executive board, said the 29 were released Thursday and branded the firings "another intimidation tactic by the coal companies." Officials at Toney's Branch Coal Co.
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NEWS
September 19, 2012 | By Neela Banerjee, This post has been corrected, as indicated below.
WASHINGTON -- On Wednesday, the Mitt Romney campaign released an ad spotlighting President Obama's putative "War On Coal," despite a controversy in Ohio about the coal miners' rally featured in the spot. In the ad, Romney appears on a stage before rows of hard-hatted miners, their faces smudged with coal dust, as he says, “We have 250 years of coal. Why wouldn't we use it?” The rally was held last month in Beallsville, Ohio, thick with miners from the Century coal mine, owned by Murray Energy, a major donor to Republican causes.
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BUSINESS
January 31, 1988
W. S. White Jr. and John E. Katlic have been named chairman and president, respectively, of the 11 American Electric Power coal companies. White, who continues as chief executive, previously was president. Katlic, who continues as chief operating officer, had been executive vice president. The AEP coal companies are: Central Ohio Coal, Southern Ohio Coal and Conesville Coal Preparation companies and Simco Inc.
NEWS
August 29, 2012 | By Neela Banerjee, This post has been updated.
WASHINGTON -- Employees of a major coal industry donor to Republican causes have raised complaints about their participation in an event earlier this month organized for GOP presidential candidate Mitt Romney in the crucial swing state of Ohio. Several miners at Murray Energy's Century coal mine in Beallsville, Ohio, contacted a nearby morning talk radio host, David Blomquist, over the last two weeks to say that they were forced to attend an Aug. 14 rally for Romney at the mine. Murray closed the mine the day of the rally, saying it was necessary for security and safety, then docked miners the day's pay. Asked by WWVA radio's Blomquist about the allegations on Monday's show, Murray chief operating officer Robert Moore said: “Attendance was mandatory but no one was forced to attend the event.” The Century mine is owned by Robert Murray, an enthusiastic Romney supporter and major contributor to the Republican Party on his own and through Murray Energy, one of the largest private coal companies in the U.S. Murray and his wife have given Republican candidates a total of $471,185 since the 2008 election, including the maximum of $5,000 each to Romney this year, according to the Center for Responsive Politics.
NEWS
June 22, 1989 | From Associated Press
More than 42,000 coal miners in 10 states took part in wildcat strikes Wednesday that spread in Appalachia and the Midwest. Reports of violence and blockades mounted as coal companies sought relief from the courts. "It looks like the bulk of the industry is shut down," said Taylor Pensoneau, vice president of the Illinois Coal Assn. More than 7,000 miners in Illinois and 700 in Ohio joined the wildcat strike Wednesday in sympathy with about 1,900 United Mine Workers members striking Pittston Coal Group Inc. in West Virginia, Virginia and Kentucky.
NEWS
May 11, 1993 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The United Mine Workers ordered 2,000 miners on strike in Indiana and Illinois. The miners, who have worked without a contract since May 3, struck AMAX Coal Co., Zeigler Coal Co. and Arch Mineral Corp., union President Richard L. Trumka said. Thomas Hoffman, chief negotiator for the Bituminous Coal Operators Assn., which represents the nation's 12 largest coal companies, said he was disappointed by the decision. Talks between the union and the companies were suspended last week.
NEWS
August 29, 2012 | By Neela Banerjee, This post has been updated.
WASHINGTON -- Employees of a major coal industry donor to Republican causes have raised complaints about their participation in an event earlier this month organized for GOP presidential candidate Mitt Romney in the crucial swing state of Ohio. Several miners at Murray Energy's Century coal mine in Beallsville, Ohio, contacted a nearby morning talk radio host, David Blomquist, over the last two weeks to say that they were forced to attend an Aug. 14 rally for Romney at the mine. Murray closed the mine the day of the rally, saying it was necessary for security and safety, then docked miners the day's pay. Asked by WWVA radio's Blomquist about the allegations on Monday's show, Murray chief operating officer Robert Moore said: “Attendance was mandatory but no one was forced to attend the event.” The Century mine is owned by Robert Murray, an enthusiastic Romney supporter and major contributor to the Republican Party on his own and through Murray Energy, one of the largest private coal companies in the U.S. Murray and his wife have given Republican candidates a total of $471,185 since the 2008 election, including the maximum of $5,000 each to Romney this year, according to the Center for Responsive Politics.
NEWS
April 14, 2002 | ELIZABETH SHOGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The cluster of forested peaks that soared skyward behind Donald "Joe" Barnett's house is gone. So are the streams that flowed through them. Miners sheared several hundred feet off the mountaintops to expose rich veins of coal and then piled up the leftover rock and dirt in a nearby valley to make a naked, flat-topped, 400-foot plateau.
NEWS
June 28, 1989 | From Associated Press
A federal judge on Tuesday ordered an end to wildcat strikes by nearly 43,000 coal miners in nine states, saying they are violating U.S. labor law. U.S. District Judge Dennis Knapp said the walkout by United Mine Workers members violated National Labor Relations Act guidelines against secondary boycotts. The walkout began June 12 in support of 1,900 UMW members who went on strike April 5 against the Pittston Coal Group after working for 14 months without a contract. Knapp issued a temporary injunction at the request of the National Labor Relations Board.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 15, 2011 | By Sheri Linden, Special to the Los Angeles Times
"The Last Mountain" is a damning look at Big Coal and its landscape-decimating practices, a litany of disheartening statistics and enraging testimony. But director Bill Haney leavens the lament with a moving portrait of the West Virginia residents who are standing up to the bulldozing — physical and spiritual — to save an Appalachian peak from the fate of its neighbors. Whether the view is aerial or up close and personal, the documentary presents wrenching evidence that mountaintop removal mining is more expedient for the coal companies — key among them the headline-familiar Massey Energy — and disastrous for just about everyone else.
NEWS
August 14, 2012 | By Seema Mehta, This post has been corrected, as indicated below.
BEALLSVILLE, Ohio -- Visiting Appalachian coal country on Tuesday, Mitt Romney accused President Obama of “waging a war on coal,” and pledged to pursue all forms of domestic energy so the nation would no longer be dependent on sources outside of North America. “We have 250 years of coal, why in the heck wouldn't we use it?” Romney said, speaking in front of hard-hat-wearing miners who roared in approval. “We're going to take advantage of our energy resources to save your jobs, to create more jobs.” Romney spoke in the parking lot of the American Energy Corp.
NATIONAL
July 3, 2012 | By Laura J. Nelson
A derailed Spokane-bound train interrupted an interstate railroad thoroughfare for more than 24 hours, but the tracks were to reopen Tuesday night, BNSF Railway Co. officials said. The freight train derailed Monday, spewing 31 cars and tons of coal dust across the arid grasslands of southeast Washington. More than 50 workers from a nearby town bulldozed 30 of the 31 cars into a heap, righted the last one, and cleared the tracks, officials said. The derailment remains under investigation, but it provides fodder for opponents of a proposed increase in coal shipping in the Pacific Northwest.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 15, 2011 | By Sheri Linden, Special to the Los Angeles Times
"The Last Mountain" is a damning look at Big Coal and its landscape-decimating practices, a litany of disheartening statistics and enraging testimony. But director Bill Haney leavens the lament with a moving portrait of the West Virginia residents who are standing up to the bulldozing — physical and spiritual — to save an Appalachian peak from the fate of its neighbors. Whether the view is aerial or up close and personal, the documentary presents wrenching evidence that mountaintop removal mining is more expedient for the coal companies — key among them the headline-familiar Massey Energy — and disastrous for just about everyone else.
NATIONAL
August 9, 2010 | By Peter Slavin, Los Angeles Times
Those who have sought to keep West Virginia's Blair Mountain open for strip mining despite its storied past did not reckon with Kenny King. It was on Blair Mountain in 1921 that an army of coal miners clashed with an armed force representing the authorities in league with coal companies — the largest battle on American soil since the Civil War and a watershed in labor's struggle for recognition. The state kept the Battle of Blair Mountain out of its history books for half a century and for decades has resisted appeals to commemorate the conflict, presumably because the insurrection was a black eye for the state and the coal industry.
NATIONAL
May 1, 2010 | Tom Hamburger, Tribune Washington Bureau
The Justice Department has launched a criminal investigation into the explosion at Massey Energy Co.'s Upper Big Branch mine in West Virginia, law enforcement sources said Friday. The case originated in the U.S. attorney's office in the Southern District of West Virginia, which has prosecuted the coal company for criminal violations of safety standards in the past. A spokesman for that office referred questions to the Justice Department's press office in Washington, which declined to comment.
BUSINESS
August 13, 2009 | Steven Mufson, Mufson writes for the Washington Post.
At a bend in the Ohio River, a bulky new device is being attached to a 30-year-old coal plant near the small town of New Haven, W.Va. The device is being housed in a building four stories tall and bigger than a football field. A 150-foot-tall exhaust stack -- so wide that it would take six adults with their arms fully stretched to reach around it -- will reach into the sky. And pipelines will run out of the building and into saline aquifers two miles underground. The entire contraption will start up as early as September.
NATIONAL
July 3, 2012 | By Laura J. Nelson
A derailed Spokane-bound train interrupted an interstate railroad thoroughfare for more than 24 hours, but the tracks were to reopen Tuesday night, BNSF Railway Co. officials said. The freight train derailed Monday, spewing 31 cars and tons of coal dust across the arid grasslands of southeast Washington. More than 50 workers from a nearby town bulldozed 30 of the 31 cars into a heap, righted the last one, and cleared the tracks, officials said. The derailment remains under investigation, but it provides fodder for opponents of a proposed increase in coal shipping in the Pacific Northwest.
NATIONAL
April 28, 2009 | Times Wire Reports
The Obama administration took steps to reverse a last-minute Bush-era rule that allows mountaintop mining waste to be dumped near streams. Interior Secretary Ken Salazar said he wanted a federal judge to give the Office of Surface Mining another chance to refine the buffer zone rule. Salazar proposed the temporary reinstatement of a 1983 rule that would keep coal companies 100 feet away from streams unless they could prove mining wouldn't harm water quality or quantity.
MAGAZINE
June 6, 2004 | Sean Patrick Reily, Writer Sean Patrick Reily is the director of editorial business and planning for The Times.
"Somewhere far away from us, people have no understanding that their demand for cheap electricity, air conditioning and lights 24 hours a day have contributed to the imbalance of this very delicate place." -- Nicole Horseherder, Navajo, Black Mesa * For years upon years beneath star-heavy skies, the Navajo awakened before the sun rose over northeastern Arizona's Black Mesa to guide their sheep to the natural waters of desert washes and springs to beat the overwhelming heat of day.
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