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NEWS
October 13, 1988 | United Press International
The Conservative Party, trying to remain in power through the 1990s, vowed Wednesday to denationalize Britain's coal industry--once virtually ruled by the miners' union. On the second day of their annual convention, the Tories also called for a "national crusade against crime" with many speakers asking for a restoration of the death penalty during a lively debate.
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BUSINESS
March 28, 2014 | By Neela Banerjee
WASHINGTON - In an effort to deliver on President Obama's pledge last summer to tackle emissions that drive climate change, the White House announced a strategy to limit releases of methane, a highly potent greenhouse gas. The methane strategy, disclosed Friday, is the most recent in a string of climate change initiatives that the White House has unveiled at a rapid pace in recent weeks. It lays the groundwork for regulations that could affect agriculture and the oil, gas and coal industries.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 6, 2001 | From the Washington Post
Carl Bagge, the flamboyant president of the National Coal Assn. from 1971 to 1987 who battled the nascent environmental movement and said he was doing holy work because coal was "God's fuel," has died. He was 74. Bagge died April 25 of a heart attack at a hospital in Boynton Beach, Fla.
NEWS
September 20, 2013 | By Neela Banerjee
WASHINGTON -- The Environmental Protection Agency proposed new rules on Friday to reduce future carbon dioxide emissions from new power plants, a major step to address climate change that industry and some environmentalist say could all but end the construction of coal-fired plants in the United States. Under the proposed rules, new coal plants would have to reduce emissions of heat-trapping carbon dioxide to 1,100 pounds per megawatt hour from the industry's current range of 1,800 to 2,200 pounds per megawatt hour.
NEWS
October 14, 1992 | WILLIAM TUOHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Confronting huge stockpiles and dwindling demand, the once-mighty British coal industry announced Tuesday that it will close 31 pits and eliminate a staggering 30,000 jobs--75% of the nation's miners. The sweeping cuts--which will be felt nationwide with full force within months, although officials have promised to assist miners as much as possible during the transition--leave only 19 working mines in a previously powerful industry.
NEWS
June 21, 1987 | TAD BARTIMUS, Associated Press
Wally McRae grew up beside Rosebud Creek, a few miles east of where Indian fighter George Armstrong Custer died in the battle of Little Bighorn in 1876. The heritage of his grandfathers, who arrived less than a decade after Custer's death, instilled in McRae a fierce love for his land. "My dad's philosophy was that the ranch was more important than anything, more important than love, more important than life," the 51-year-old cattleman said.
BUSINESS
December 5, 1997 | ERIKA CHAVEZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Creating a critical link between America's Western coal mines and the Pacific Rim, the new Los Angeles Export Terminal is expected to help boost exports for the nation's $17.9-billion coal industry, city officials and business leaders said Thursday as they inaugurated the state-of-the art, $200-million facility at Terminal Island.
NEWS
March 26, 2001 | From the Washington Post
In the last election, few businesses placed as big a bet on Republicans as the coal industry, which gave 88 cents out of every dollar in campaign contributions to GOP candidates or organizations. Two months into the Bush administration, that wager has begun to pay off. President Bush has jettisoned a campaign promise to require coal-burning power plants to reduce emissions of carbon dioxide, after heeding industry warnings that such action could "kill coal."
NATIONAL
August 15, 2012 | By Christi Parsons and Seema Mehta, Los Angeles Times
OSKALOOSA, Iowa - President Obama visited an Iowa farm Tuesday where a family grows corn and soybeans while also generating wind energy with several turbines on their 1,000 acres. Republican Mitt Romney spent time at an Ohio coal mine, speaking in front of hard-hat-wearing workers whose livelihood depends on continued demand for their often-maligned product. In grand terms, the fight between Obama and Romney over energy policy centers on the role of federal regulators in protecting public health and promoting particular industries for the good of the country.
NEWS
October 20, 1992 | WILLIAM TUOHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a politically embarrassing about-face, the British government declared Monday that last week's announced closing of more than half of the nation's coal mines will be partially rescinded. The original decision to close 31 out of 50 mines, at the cost of 30,000 miners' jobs, had provoked a firestorm of public and political outrage nationwide.
NATIONAL
September 20, 2013 | By Neela Banerjee
WASHINGTON - The tough restrictions on new power plant emissions proposed by the Obama administration Friday set the stage for the far thornier and significant decision due next year: What will the Environmental Protection Agency do to rein in greenhouse gases from existing power plants? The nation's power plants are the single largest source of heat-trapping emissions. Supporters and critics of the EPA's proposed rule are parsing it, in particular, for clues to how the administration would reduce carbon dioxide from existing plants that burn coal, the biggest source of fuel for electricity.
NATIONAL
March 2, 2013 | By Neela Banerjee, Washington Bureau
BELLAIRE, Ohio - The four miners who gathered one blustery morning at the United Mine Workers of America hall know that, so far, they are lucky. Their coal mines along the West Virginia state line are still working, having survived a painful 30-year decline in the industry. But a new threat has pushed into Ohio, imperiling the primacy of coal here and all over the country.   "I feel worried about the future, that natural gas is a threat to us," said Tim Merryman, 54. "Some of those coal plants will convert [to natural gas]
NEWS
November 9, 2012 | By Kim Geiger
Citing what he perceives as an Obama administration “war on coal,” an Ohio coal mining executive and prominent Republican donor responded to the results of the presidential election by laying off more than 150 workers. Robert Murray, chief executive of Murray Energy Co., the largest privately held coal company in America, blamed the layoffs on President Obama --  and, by extension, the voters who elected him -- in a memo to employees. “The American people have made their choice,” Murray said in what he called a prayer that he delivered at a staff meeting at which he discussed the layoffs.
NATIONAL
August 15, 2012 | By Christi Parsons and Seema Mehta, Los Angeles Times
OSKALOOSA, Iowa - President Obama visited an Iowa farm Tuesday where a family grows corn and soybeans while also generating wind energy with several turbines on their 1,000 acres. Republican Mitt Romney spent time at an Ohio coal mine, speaking in front of hard-hat-wearing workers whose livelihood depends on continued demand for their often-maligned product. In grand terms, the fight between Obama and Romney over energy policy centers on the role of federal regulators in protecting public health and promoting particular industries for the good of the country.
NEWS
August 14, 2012 | By Christi Parsons
OSAKALOOSA, Iowa - The presidential candidates turn to the topic of energy Tuesday as they travel to different battleground states with different interests in future U.S. energy policy. In Iowa, President Obama plans to talk about wind energy as he pushes Congress to extend the production tax credit for companies investing in this growing alternative source. In Ohio coal country, meanwhile, Republican Mitt Romney is expected to talk about Obama's “war on coal” and the strain he says it puts on an industry that helps to power the state's economy.
NEWS
August 14, 2012 | By Seema Mehta, This post has been corrected, as indicated below.
BEALLSVILLE, Ohio -- Visiting Appalachian coal country on Tuesday, Mitt Romney accused President Obama of “waging a war on coal,” and pledged to pursue all forms of domestic energy so the nation would no longer be dependent on sources outside of North America. “We have 250 years of coal, why in the heck wouldn't we use it?” Romney said, speaking in front of hard-hat-wearing miners who roared in approval. “We're going to take advantage of our energy resources to save your jobs, to create more jobs.” Romney spoke in the parking lot of the American Energy Corp.
OPINION
October 10, 2008
Re "Mining for votes," editorial, Oct. 7 Your editorial was dead-on. "Clean coal" has been feeding at the federal R&D trough for decades, and coal is still dirty. So is coal mining and coal transit. Neither presidential candidate has felt it necessary to define what they mean by the term, and neither has mentioned carbon sequestration, coal's only hope. The public's only hope is to urge that the next president's transition team contains no coal industry representatives, e.g., lobbyists and campaign donors, and that it takes no high-level personnel recommendations from the coal industry.
NEWS
April 5, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The Labor Department said it has found widespread fraud in the coal industry by mine operators who repeatedly tampered with the coal dust samples used to gauge miners' risk of black lung disease. A 20-month investigation uncovered about 4,700 alleged instances of tampering at about 850 underground coal mines, Labor Secretary Lynn Martin said. The department proposes that a record $5 million in fines be levied against 500 companies for alleged tampering at mines in 16 states.
NEWS
June 26, 2012 | By Paul West
SALEM, Va. - Previewing his response to this week's expected decision on the nation's healthcare law, Mitt Romney told supporters in southwestern Virginia on Tuesday that healthcare is a matter of “states' rights” and “personal responsibility” and that he'd block the federal plan if the Supreme Court doesn't. Romney, whose individual health insurance mandate in Massachusetts was a model for the provision at the heart of  the current debate, said that if the court strikes down the federal law later this week, “then the first three-and-a-half years of this president's term will have been wasted on something that has not helped the American people.” Alternately, if the justices uphold the law, “we're going to need a president--and I'm that one--that's going to get rid of Obamacare.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 20, 2012 | By Dean Kuipers
The Sierra Club's Beyond Coal campaign, working in concert with a number of environmental and energy activists and researchers in Washington and Montana, announced Thursday a new push to get Puget Sound Energy to stop buying power from coal-fired Colstrip Generating Station in Montana. According to EPA rankings, the facility is the eighth most egregious emitter of greenhouse gases among power plants in the U.S. The campaign announced this as a "bold move" in their nationwide push to negotiate closure dates for coal-fired plants, or to get them switched to cleaner-burning natural gas, since PSE is also a leader among utilities in developing wind farms and pushing for greener forms of electrical generation.
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